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BRITISH GAZETTEER, 

P-OLITICAL, COMMERCIAL, ECCLESIASTICAL, 
AND HISTORICAL; 



THK DISTANCES OF EACH PLACE EKOM LONDON AND DEBET— GENTLEMEN'S SEATS— 
POPULATIONS— nraS AND HOTELS— POSTAL ARBANGKMENT8— 
BAKKEB&-HAEEETS, FAIBS, &c 

Hj.i!jmiisafS!i ET a ratt sit ©f ®®ytsTV Maps, 

PZ t^e llailiuags atcnraldg Iai!ir )iebr, 

FOEMma AT OBCB AN lEON EOAD-BOO! ASD COIHTY ATUS. 



BY B. CLARKE, ESQ., 




VOLUME III. 
L — Z. 

LONDON; 

pnBl.I8HEI> (FOR THE PROPEIBTORS) BY H. G. COLLINS, 
1852. 





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THE BRITISH GAZETTEER 



XSD 



TRAVELLING ROAD BOOK. 



LIV 



LIV 



LIVERPOOL, Lahcasbibe, a boroagh, parieb, 
seaport, and market town, situated in the hun**- of 
West Derby, on the eastern side of the estuary of 
the Mersey : 201 miles from London (coach road 
205), 36 from Ma&chester.^3«e^Nor. West. Kail, 
through Crewe to Liverpool : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 69 miles. ^«k>. Money orders issued 
here : London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. : 
poet closes 5 a.m. and 6} p.m.^o«»»LiyerpooI de- 
TiTes Its name, according to some authorities, from 
the Welsh words Ue W pwU^ * place on the pool,' 
on account of its having formerly been situated on 
the borders of a pool, which occupied the site of 
the present Custom-house. Others, however, de- 
rive the first syllable from a kind of wa1%r-fow1, 
anciently known as the liver or lever; but the real 
derivation is very uncertain, and the origin of the 
town cannot be authentically ascertained. Baxter 
erroneonsly supposes it to have been the harbour 
of the Tentanii, s{>oken of by Ptolemy ; but there 
is nothing to be found in corroboration of this 
assertion, and no Roman remains of any kind have 
ever been discovered here. It is not even men- 
tioned in the Doomsday survey, although that 
book contains a grant of all the ports of Lanca- 
shire, between the Kibble and the Mersey, to 
Roger of Poictiers, who, we are told by Camden, 
buih a castle here. To the erection of this castle, 
the origin of the town may most probably be 
ascribed. The castle subsequently passed into 
various hands; and in 1715, its remains having 
been pulled down, St. George's church was erected 
on its site. The conquest of Ireland, in 1172, 
first raised Liverpool to some importance, in con- 
sequence of its being a convenient spot for embark- 
ing for that country : a circumstance which indi- 
cates the root of its present importance. Henry 
II., and his successors, granted it several charters, 
and in 1227 it was constituted a free borough. In 
1338, Liverpool furnished King Edward III. with 
a small vessel, manned with six mariners, for his 
expedition against France. The plague ravaged 
the town in the years 1361 and 15^8. A procla- 



mation was made here in 1566 for the first lottery 
spoken of in the annals of this country. In 1630 
Liverpool was rated at £25 for ship-money by 
Charles I. During the, civil war. Prince Rupert 
besieged it, and t66k it by storm on the 26th June, 
1644, after it had held out for twenty-four days, 
when all the inhabitants were put to the sword till 
the besiegers reached the High Cross, at the front 
of the present town-hall, the survivors being made 
prisoners. In the following year, however, the 
town again fell into the hands of the parliament. 
In 1690, King William III. embarked here with 
his army on his way to Ireland. From that period 
Liverpool has gradually increased in opulence and 
in commerce, and now carries on an immense 
trdffic with all quarters of the globe. Its trade 
with America, with the north of Europe, and with 
the East Indies, is every day increasing, and it is 
now one of the most prosperous and flourishing sea- 
ports in the kingdom. The town has been much 
enlarged of late years, and contains a great num- 
ber of noble and convenient public buildings, and 
several religious edifices. Liverpool was originally, 
quoad spirUtMliaf a chapelry to Walton. At the 
dissolution there were four chantries in this cha- 
pel : the king's rent was £10. Is. 4d. It was not 
till the 10th year of William III. that an act was 
passed, declaring, that from 24th June, 1699, the 
town and liberties of Liverpool should constitute a 
distinct parish, separate from Walton ; the living 
to be a rectory, in two medieties, in the aichd^* 
and diocese of Chester, and the patronage to be 
vested in the mayor and corporation. The old 
parochial chapel was now called the church of St 
Nicholas, and a new church, dedicated to St. Peter, 
was erected. St. Peter's church was founded in 
1699, and consecrated in 1704. It is a plain but 
well built structure, with a tower 108 feet high, 
and a peal of ten well toned bells. It contains 
some curious carvings in oak. The gross income 
of this mediety, in 1835, was £615. St. Nicho- 
las' church was erected in 1 774, on the base of the 
ancient structure. It is a neat GU)thic edifice. 



VOL. ni. 



LIV 



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The tower and spire were erected in 1810, the old 
one having fallen on 11th February, same year, 
daring the ringing of the bells. Twenty-eight 
persons were killed; bat it was fortnnate the acci- 
dent took place then, for had it been bat a few 
minates later, many more lives mast have been 
lost. Almost the whole pews in the centre of the 
church were either entirely demolished or much 
injured, and the west gallery and organ were com- 
pletely destroyed. A new and extremely light 
and elegant ornamental Gothic tower, about 40 
yards in height, surmounted by an open lantern 
20 yards in height, was afterwards erected. A 
peal of twelve bells has also been added. The gross 
income of this mediety, in 1835, was also £615. 
Amongst the churches and chapels in Liverpool, 
besides those of St. Peter and St. Nicholas, 
there are many elegant and highly-finished edi- 
fices, some of which are held to be superior both 
in style and size to most other fabrics of a simi- 
lar rank in England. The style and order of 
architecture is very various, from the noblest 
Corinthian, Doric, and Gothic, down to the plain 
and humble barn-yard style of the Quakers' 
meeting'house. St. Peter's, St. John's, St. George's, 
imd Bt. Thomas's, are handsome and well-built 
chim^bes. St. Paul's is a miniature imitation of 
the great Cathedral of London. There are a great 
numb^ of other churche8,gall of them elegant and 
commodious, and some of them, especially St.Luke'8, 
St. Michael's, and the church of the Blind School, 
displaying considerable taste in their designs. 
Of the perpetual curacies in the parish, the follow- 
ing were in the patronage of the corporation, pre- 
vious to 1835; — St. Gteorge's, gross income £130; 
St. Thomas', gross income £138 : St. Paul's, gross 
income £1 95 ; St. Anne's, gross income £99 : St. 
John's, gross income £270; St. Michael's, gross 
income £290; St. Luke's, gross income £508; 
St. Martin's, gross income £530; Trinity, g^oss 
income £250. The others are: — St. Andrew; 
gross income £295. Patron, in 1 635, J. Gladstone, 
Esq. — St. Bridget's ; gross income, £305. Patrons, 
in 1835, trustees. — St. Catherine; gross income 
£250. Patrons, in 1835, trustees.— Christ church ; 
gross income £105. Patron, in 1835, J. Hough- 
ton, Esq. — St. David's ; gross income £120. Pat- 
rons, in 1835, trustees. — St. Mark's; gross income 
£370; Patrons, in 1835, trustees.— St. Matthew's; 
gross income £107. Patrons, the rectors of Liver- 
pool. — St. Philip's: gross income £400. Patron, 
in 1835, J. Cragg, Esq. — St Stephen's; gross in- 
come £120. Patrons, the rectoi-s of Liverpool. 
There are two floating chapels for seamen ; 9 Inde- 
pendent and 9 Baptist places of worship ; 4 Welsh 
Cblvinist ; 1 Society of Friends ; 12 Methodist, — 
including I Primitive, 2 New Connexion, 7 Wes- 
leyan, 1 Independent, and 1 Associate; — 1 Sande- 
manian; 1 Swedenborgian; 1 Universalist; and 2 
Unitarian chapels. There are also 2 Scottish kirks, 
2 Secession, and 5 Roman CoilJiolic chapels; a 
Jews' synagogue, and a Hebrew church. The 
Roman Catholic population of Liverpool is now 
rated at 80,000, and is yearly on tlie increase. 
Six- elevenths of the whole population are said to 
be Roman Catholics and dissenters. In so af- 
fluent a place as Liverpool, the religious and 
educational societies and institutions are, as 



might be expected, numerous and important, 
having every possible object in view that can 
promote moral and intellectual advancement. 
The elegant Town-hall, commenced in 1749, stands 
in an elevated and convenient situation ; it is in the 
Corinthian style of architecture, and contains a 
spacious saloon with some splendid portraits of 
different members of the Royal Family ; a most 
magnificent ball-room, 89 feet long, by 41 feet 6 
inches wide, and 40 feet high, sumptuously fitted 
up ; a smaller ball-room, two drawing rooms, and a 
bauquetting-room. The ground story contains a 
council-room, committee-rooms, rooms for the may- 
or, and other offices, &c., and the basement contains 
a spacious kitchen, with appropriate offices. The 
building is surmounted by an elegant dome, which 
presents a most imposing appearance when viewed 
fVom the inside, the entire height being 1 06 feet. 
On the first stairckse there is a colossal statue of 
I the illustrious Canning, from the hand of the cele- 
; brated Chan trey. The New Exchange, buildings, 
commenced in 1803, and erected from designs by 
John Foster, Esq., consist of four inside fa^ea, 
three of which adjoin each other, the northern ele- 
vation of the Town-hall completing the quadrangle. 
The area enclosed by the two fronts is 197 feet 
from north to south, and 178 feet from east to west. 
The inside fronts have each a grand piazza, 15 feet 
in width. In the east wing there is a news and 
coffee room, 94 feet by 52, and above it a spacious 
apartment for the underwriters. The front and west 
and part of the east wings contain several commo- 
dious counting-houses, and there are extensive 
warehouses at the back of the building. The new 
assize-court and sessions-house is a commodious 
and spacious building, containing apartments fitted 
up in a manner well adapted to the purposes for 
which they were erected; the principal room, which 
is used for the nisiprius or civil causes, is 61 feet 
6 inch A long, by 23 feet wide. The magnificent 
new custom-house was erected on the site of the 
old dock, in 1828, from designs by Mr. Foster, the 
corporation's architect. The east and west fronts, 
and also the centre, have splendid porticoes orna- 
mented with the royal arms. The entire basement 
is appropriated for the reception of bonded and 
other goods, the west wing is used for the fiscal 
offices, and in the centre are the approaches, and 
the " Long- Room," which is 146 feet in leng^, by 
70 feet in width, and 45 feet in height; the seg- 
ment ceiling is supported by 16 columns, and the 
whole is surmounted by a beautiful dome about 50 
feet high. The building is of freestone, and is 
466 feet 8 inches in length, measuring from east 
to west ; the length of the wings is 224 feet 7 in- 
ches, and their width is 94 feet 4 inches ; the length 
of the centre is 252 feet 6 inches, and its width 
through the portico is 95 feet. The entire build- 
ing presents an appearance of the greatest sim- 
plicity and grandeur. The building erected for 
the purposes of the Liverpool Royal Institution in 
Colquitt Street, opened in 1817, and incorporated 
by Royal Charter in 1822, is a large and uniform 
structure, with a neat stone portico, containing a 
public or reading room, a lecture-room, committee- 
rooms, a museum, with interesting specimens of 
natural history and mineralogy, some paintings 
and statuary, &c. The institution was formed in 




the year 1814 for the pnvnotion of literature, 
ficieucef and the arts, and the corporation oontrihate 
£100 annually, £50 of which is awarded for the 
best oil painting. LiTerpool also contains a Me- 
chanics' Institution, founded in 1835 ; the stmcture 
was erected at an expense of £11,000, and after- 
wards partly rebuilt at an expense of £3,000. It 
is in the Ionic style, and contains an excellent 
theatre for lectures, capable of accommodating 
1,500 auditors, a sculptaie gallery, in which there 
are several fine statues, a museum, a reading-room, 
and a library of several thousand volumes. The 
Athencum, opened in 1799, was the first of the 
kind instituted in this country. The structure is 
a neat building, erected at an expense of £4,000, 
in Church Street It has a library of more than 
14,000 volumes, among which are some very rare 
and curious works. The Lyceum, in Bold Street, 
named after an edifice in Athens in which Aris- 
totle taught his dogmas of philosophy, was erected 
in 1802, at an expense of £11,000, which was de- 
rived from public subscriptions. The coffee-room 
IS very spacious and commodious, and furnished, 
like that of the AthensBum, with a large collection 
of London and proTincial newspapers, magazines, 
reviews, maps, and every other species of Uterary 
work; the library eontains upwards of 30,000 
volumes. Several newspapers are published in 
Liverpool weekly, one twice a week, and one three 
times a week. There are some splendid new baths 
on the west side of St (Seorge's Dock, extending 
239 feet in front of the river, and 87 feet ia breadth 
backwards : they are built of stone and are fitted 
up with every requisite accommodation. The 
Theatre is an ornamental and commodious brick. 
Btmctore, with a stone front; the stage is spacious. 
It was opened in 1772; and it was at this theatre 
that Mr. John Palmer died on the 2d August, 1798, 
whilst performing the play of the ^ Stranger," and 
immediately after uttering the sentence, " There is 
ainoiher and a beUer woM.*^ The Rojral Amphi- 
theatre is a large, elegant building, chiefly appro- 
priated to the performance of equestrian exercises, 
pantomimic exhibitions, kc. The Liver Theatre 
is tastefully fitted up. The Wellington Rooms 
contain spacious ball, card, and supper rooms; the 
front is of stone, and in the Corinthian style. In 
the Museum there is an interesting collection of 
natural objects, and of pieces of ancient armour. 
The Zoological Gardens are tastefully laid out, and 
conducted on the same principle as those of the 
Begent*s Park, London, Botanic Gardens. The 
Mount, or St James's Walk, affords an agreeable 
promenade, commanding an extensive prospect 
The charitable institutions in Liverpool are nume- 
rous and well supported. The Infirmary, situated 
in Brownlow Street, and one of the most consider- 
able edifices in the town, is a spacious and elegant 
three storied edifice, consisting of a centre and two 
wings, having a portico of the Ionic order, with 
massive pillars ; it was opened in 1824, having been 
erected at an expense of £27,800, whieh was col- 
lected by public subscription. There are 20 wards, 
5 of which, containing 104 beds, are appropriated 
to surgical cases ; 4, containing 47 beds, to medical 
cases for males, and the remainder are divided for 
females into 3 surgical wards, containing 58 beds, 
and 2 medical oontainittg 25 beds. The medical 



attendance is gratuitous, and the annual expendi- 
ture exceeds £5,000. The Northern Hospital in 
Leeds Street, for the accommodation of 60 in-pa- 
tients, is an infirmary on a small scale, in aid of 
the principal one, and for behoof of the poor in the 
northern district of the town. The Lunatic Asy' 
lum, on the north Ride of Brownlow Hill, was 
erected in 1830. It is a neat and appropriate 
structure, rusticated beneath, and faced with stone- 
ashler above. The centre of the buildings retreats 
from the sides, thus forming them into wings. 
The expense of erection amounted to £11,000. 
Accommodation is afforded for 60 patients. There 
are extensive airing-gprounds attached, which are 
enclosed by high walls. The old lunatic asylum, 
near St. John's church, was latterly occupied as 
barracks. Amongst otlier remedial institutions 
are the south and north dispensaries, the Lock-hos- 
pital, the Ophthalmic infirmary, the Apothecaries' 
hall, the House of Recovery for fever and other 
contagious diseases, the Humane Society's institu- 
tion for the restonation of the drowned, and the 
ladies' charity for medical and other aid to poor mar- 
ried females in childbed, in which £1,000 per annum 
havebeen expended. The Liverpo(d Merchant Sea- 
men's Hospital is a charity intended for the support 
of decayed eeamen of this port, and of their widows 
and children. It is supported partly by die monthly 
contribution of sixpence, which every seaman, sail- 
ing from the port, is obliged by act of parliament 
to pay out of his wages. It has likewise a capital 
stock of about £37,000 unclaimed prize-money. 
About 700 persons receive aid fix>m tins excellent 
institution. A building was erected in 1752 on> 
ground belonging to the infirmary, at the expense 
of £1,500. The Lancaster County Refuge was 
opened in 1823. It is well-supported by voluntary.' 
subscription for the reformation of females-liberated 
from the county-jail. The Female Penitentiary, 
in Falkner Street, is a benevolent and well-sup- 
ported institution for reclaiming porostitutes. The 
House of Industry was erected at an expense of 
£8,000, and can accommodate 400 persons, who 
are employed in various works according to their 
ability. The almshouses are situated near the 
house of industry. The committee for "the relief of 
debtors confined in the borough jail, was instituted 
in 1810, and is able to carry its object into effect by 
liberal subscriptions. The Female School of In- 
dustry was begpin in 1809. One hundred young 
females are educated here. Their expenses are 
paid out of their earnings, a part of which also goes 
into a general fund, from which small annuities are 
paid to each on attaining the age of 55. The Dis- 
trict Provident Society was instituted in 1830. 
Large sums are collected by the weekly visitors of 
this society, for charitable purposes, — such as pay- 
ment of rent and supply of winter stores, clothing, 
and fnci, to the poor. In 1831, a sum of £1,460 
was thus collected; and in 1833 the amount 
was £7,620: during these three years £11,512 
were expended on the objects of this society. 
The Marine Society was instituted for the relief of 
reduced or aged masters of vessels, their widows 
and children. There are various others, — as the 
Marine Humane Society, and the Welsh and Liver- 
pool Charitable Societies. The Strangers' Friend 
. Society was founded, and is chiefly supported, by 



LIV 

Methodists, but its benefits are extended eqnally 
tc strangers of all denominations, to the average 
number of 10,000 or 12,000 per annum. The 
hospital or school for the indigent blind was estab- 
lished in 1791 : it is situate in London road, comer 
of Duncan Street. The principal occupations of 
the pupils are spinning ; hamper and basket-mak- 
ing ; plaiting of sash line ; weaving of floor-cloth 
and sacking ; the manufacture of worsted, hearth- 
rugs, and of foot-bears, points and gaskets, from 
old ropes ; and the learning of music. In this last 
department the attention of the committee is prin- 
cipally directed to qualify the pupils as organists, 
and several have obtained situations of this kind, 
while others find employment in teaching music. 
About 120 pupils are now in the school, and the 
produce of their labour brings about £1,500, or 
£2,000 per annum. An institution for the deaf 
and dumb was founded in 1825. It is situated in 
Wood Street, near Slater Street, and is calculated 
to aqpommodate from sixty to eighty occupants. 
It is a seminary rather than an asylum. Liver- 
pool is supplied with water by two companies — 
the Liverpool and Harrington Company, and the 
Liverpool (Bootle) Company. There are three 
kinds of docks, the principal of which are the wet 
docks, which receive those ships in the foreign 
trade having large cargoes to discharge; the ships 
in these are afloat at all times of the tide. The 
dry docks, or basins, are left dry when the tide is 
out, and receive the vessels tiiat are employed 
coastwise. The graving docks can be kept dry, 
or filled with water at pleasure, and are used for 
repairing ships. All of them have been hollowed 
from the shore by long continued labour and at 
vast expense. At the sides of the docks there are 
spacious warehouses, to the fl(x>rs of which the 
goods are craned up, while the space around the 
docks is used for the loading and unloading of 
ships, &c. The Canning Dock, formerly called 
the Dry dock, but now a wot one, has a quay of 
500 yards in extent, and is connected with the 
three graving docks. The Salthouse Dock has a 
quay 759 yards long, with commodious ware- 
houses. George's Dock is 246 yards in length, 
and 100 yards in breadth, with a quay of 1000 
yards, commodious warehouses and spacious gates. 
At the south-west comer there is a floating church 
for seamen, where divine service is performed 
every Sunday; handsome iron bridges span the 
north and south passages to this dock. King's 
Dock, 270 yards long, by 95 broad, has also a 
floating chapel. Queen's Dock, 470 yards long, 
and 270} broad, has a spacious quay, and com- 
municates with an extenpive basin, called the 
Branswick Half-tide Dock. Brunswick Dock, 
the largest one in the port, was opened in 1832, 
and contains an area, including the passage and 
half-tide dock, of 70,069 square yards; it was 
originally designed for vessels in the timber trade, 
and the quays are generally covered with log^ of 
that commodity ; the dock itself is a remarkably 
fine specimen of masonry. Prince's Dock is 500 
yards long, and 106 broad, and is buUt with un- 
common strength ; it is surrounded by a brick 
wall, and has a dwelling-house at the north end, 
for the master ; along the western side, next to 
the river, there is a delightful promenade, called 



LIV 

the Marine Parade, 750 yards long, and 11 yards 
broad, with a stone wall about a yard high along 
its margin, and three sets of steps to the river. 
Waterloo Dock and Clarence Dock are spacious 
and highly commodious. To the north of the 
latter are the new graving docks, which are hand- 
some and extremely well built ; one of them is 
entirely of granite : there are also two new docks 
similarly constructed, to the south of Brunswick 
Dock. The Duke of Bridgewater also possesses a 
small dock here, and there are commodious basins 
along the margin of the river for the caiTiers by 
water. Double sets of stairs lead to the west of 
George's and Prince's Docks, for the convenience 
of passengers by the steam vessels. The dock 
gates are well constructed, and by them the depth 
of water in the docks can be reg^ated. The 
whole length of the outer river wall is about 2} 
miles. Each dock is managed by a harbour-mas- 
ter, while the general superintendence of the dock 
quays, the loading and unloading of vessels in the 
docks and the prevention of plunder and disorder, 
are in^usted to the control of the dock police, who 
have a certain uniform. There are stations in the 
various docks containing apparatus for the resto- 
ration of drowned persons, &c. The dock- masters, 
dock-gatemen, and the general superintendence of 
the port, are under the direction of the harbour- 
master. The government of the docks, by an act 
of parliament of 1825, is vested in a committee 
of twenty-one persons, including a chairman and 
deputy-chairman, called " The Committee for the 
afiairs of the Estate of the Trustees of the Liver- 
pool Docks," which meets not less than once in 
each week. The common council can ratify or 
reject the proceedings, and appoint the thirteen 
trustees who are on the committee ; the chairman 
is also elected by the council, and continues in 
ofiice six years; eight of the committee are nomir 
ated from the body of the merchants or ship-owners 
of the port. The boundary of the port of Liver- 
pool, as fixed by the commissioners in their certi- 
ficate to the Exchequer in 1723, is as follows : — 
JFVom the Bed stones, in HoyUjke, on ths point of 
Wirral southerly, to the foot of the river called Hib- 
Ue-toater in a direct line northerly, and so upon the 
south side of (he said river to JSeskethrbank easterly, 
and to the river Astland and Douglas there, and so 
ali along the sea coasts of Meots and Formiby, into 
the river Mersey, and all over the rivers Mersey, 
Irwell, and Weaver. To state the amount of busi- 
ness done in this the second port, not only in 
Britain, but in the world, would be a futility, for 
every year adds to its amount and importance ; it 
may therefore suffice to say, that it reaches the 
value of many millions per annum, and the vessels 
frequenting tiie Mersey represent in a manifold de- 
gree the commerce of every nation upon the earth. 
Liverpool is peculiarly compiercial in its charac- 
ter, and is not in itself a manufacturing town, bat 
it has several houses for the refining of sugar, an 
extensive pottery, iron and brass foundi-ies, brew- 
eries, soap manufactories, wind-mills and steam- 
engines for grinding com, colours, &c., manufac- 
tories of iron-chain cables, anchors, &c. ; the 
making of files and watches is also carried on to a 
g^reat extent. There are also several large esta- 
blishments for the manufacture of steam-engines, 



iMiIers, &C., and for glass staining. To the west 
and to the south of the town there are numeroiis 
slips for the erection of vessels, from which some 
few ships of war have been hiunched. The markets 
of Liverpool are supplied with everything neces- 
sary for the convenience, or which can administer 
to Uie luxuries, of life. Ireland and Scotland fur- 
nish them with grain, horned cattle, sheep, hogs, 
bacon, and butter ; and the Isle of Man, Anglesea, 
and North Wales, with poultry, eggs, and butter ; 
Cheshire also furnishes large quantities of various 
articles of enjoyment. Vegetables and fruit are 
met with in perfection and abundance. The Com 
Exchange, a handsome structure, situated in 
Brunswick Street, is 114 feet long, by 60 feet 
wide, was erected by subscription. St. John's 
Market, finished in 1822, is a stupendous building, 
chiefly of brick, ornamented with stone, and situ- 
ated in the centre of the town. It is 183 yards 
long, and 45 broad, forming a covered space of 
I 6,235 yards, and it has eight spacious entrances. 
The interior is a large, lofty, airy hall, which has 
four rows of handsome cast-iron pillars, 25 feet 
high, 116 in number. It contains 58 shops, 6 
offices, and an immense number of stalls and 
stands of various kinds. It is lighted at night by 
144 gas-lights; there are four pumps, communicat- 
ing with excellent wells. A new fish market has 
recently been erected. St. James's Market, a fine 
brick building, covered in, contains about 3,000 
square yards. St Martin's Market, which is 213 
feet long, by 135 wide, though not so large as St. 
John's, is a handsomer building ; it is also covered 
in. It has two principal fironts, consisting of porticos 
of Grecian Doric, of four columns, and two side 
entrances, approached by flights of steps. The in- 
terior is well ventilated, and contains five avenues. 
This building, like others of ^ similar description in 
the town, wos erec^ by the corporation, at a cost 
of about £13,000. Besides these, there are other 
smaller markets in different parts of the town. 
Liverpool sends two members to parliament, 
chosen by householders of £10 and upwards, and 
free burgesses. The first charter that was g^ranted 
to the town of Liverpool appears to have been 
given in the 9th year of King John, and that was 
renewed aud enlarged in its powers by numerous 
others, till the time of William III., whose grant 
fully incorporated that of Charles I., and was the 
governing charter of the town till the passing of 
the municipal reform act; the chief body in the 
corporation being 41 common oouncilmen, bur- 
gesses, from among whom the mayor, two bailiffs, 
a recorder, and a town-clerk were chosen — every 
one who had filled the office of mayor, became, 
ex officio^ an alderman. Under the new act the 
town is divided into sixteen wards, governed by 
sixteen aldermen, and forty-eight common coun- 
cillors. The revenue of the corporation, like the 
town itself, is the most opulent and splendid in 
the empire, and it has been expended in a most 
munificent and judicious manner, a sum amount- 
ing to more than £2,000,000 sterling having been 
spent during the present time in fine improve- 
ments of every part of the port. According to the 
inquiry of the municipal commissioners, the rental 
derived from other sources than the dock estate 
was £96,308. 4s. 9d., and that from the dock 



estate was £201,376. lOs. lid. Liverpool has its 
peculiar jurisdiction in some civil cases of damage, 
the chief of its especial privileges existing in the 
constitution of the Court of Record, called the 
*^ Court of Passage," which was established by 
prescription, until its proceeding^ and practice 
were materially altered and amended since the in- 
quiry at Liverpool — at first by an act passed 30th 
July, 1834 — the mayor and bailiff were the pre- 
siding officers, and the court was held once a week 
by adjournment, but only four times a year — 
namely, at the quarter-sessions for trial of causes. 
The constitution of this court, however, is now 
regulated by acts 4th and 5th Will. IV., c. 92— 
6th and 7th Will. IV., c. 153— 1st Vict, c. 98— 
1st and 2d Vict., c. 99, as well as by the municipal 
act, 5th and 6th Will. IV., c. 76, and by a public 
act, 2d Vict, (session 1839), for the regrulaticn of 
borough courts. The officers are now the assistant 
barrister, a chairman, and a registrar, with assist- 
ants, besides a serg^ant-at-mace with a clerk, a 
crier of the court, a water-bailiff who is also har- 
bour-master of the port, a deputy water-bailiff, 
and two sub-bi^iliffs. The assistant-barrister acts 
as assessor. The mayor for the time being is the 
judge, but under the local act, 6th and 7th Will. 
IV., c. 135, the assessor may hold courts for trial 
of issues, and hearing of motions for new trials 
and special arguments; and under the local act, 
1st Vict., c. 98, the town-clerk, as registrar, may 
transact all other business. The assistant-barris- 
ter WHS appointed assessor by the Crown ; but it ap- 
pears to be a question, whether by the municipal 
act the office is not in the council, by whom also 
the registrar, &c. are appointed. The assistant- 
barrister's salary is £500 per annumr payable out 
of the borough fund. The registrar is guaranteed 
£2,000 per annum as town-clerk, registrar, clerk 
of the peace, and parliamentary solicitor and attor- 
ney. The serg^eant-at-mace receives £350 per an- 
num, and the inferior officers £20 to £25. The 
water-bailiff receives no salary. The jurisdiction 
of this court is in all personal actions, and in certain 
actions of ejectment between landlord and tenant, 
and it extends over the whole of the municipal 
borough, the new boundaries of which coinddo 
with those of the parliamentary borough, and over 
the whole of the Mersey from Warrington and 
Frodsham bridges to the mouth of the estuary, and 
beyond it at sea within certain limits. The pro- 
ceeding^ are similar to those of the superior coarts 
at Westminster. The courts for the ordinary re- 
covery of debts have all been influenced by the 
general county court act. The police force for so 
large a community is placed under admirable re- 
gpilations, being managed much on the plan of the 
metropolitan force, and for its efficient support the 
large sum of £40,000 a year is not considered too 
great an outlay. The climate of Liverpool is re- 
markably healthy. The soil is dry and sandy, and 
is peculiarly favourable to the g^wth of potatoes. 
Among the celebrated natives of this town may be 
mentioned : Deare, the sculptor, who was bom Oct. 
18, 1760, and at the age of twenty obtained tlie 
gold medal of the Royal Academy for his ** Struggle 
in the air of Satan with the Angel ;" he died at an 
early age. Qeorge Stubbs, the celebrated animal 
painter, and author of a work on the anatomy of 



LIV 



i> 



LLA 



the horse, who died in 1806, at upwards of eighty 
years of age. Jei'emiah Horrox, who was bom in 
1619, and if he had lived would probably have be- 
come famous as an astronomer; he discovered the 
transit of Yenus over the sun's disk, and also a new 
theory of lunar motions, and died at the age of 
twenty-two. Mrs. Hemans, Mr. Koscoe, Dr. Cur- 
xie, and his son Mr. W. W. Currie, Rev. W. Shep^ 
herd, and a host of others, who if they did not attain 
the same reputation, strengthened and enriched 
their country by noble contributions from every 
faulty of the human mind, and left a munificent 
legacy to posterity in the works of their genius. 
^>^Pop»- in 1841, 286,487.-«-c-Market days, 
Wednesday and Saturday. Fairs: July 25, Nov. 
ll.^^MvBankers: Israel, Bamed, & Co. — draw on 
Price, Marryat, &Co., and James fiult. Sen. & Go. ; 
Arthur Heywood, Sons, & Co. — draw on Denison, 
Heywood, & Co.; Leyland & Bullins — draw on 
Masterman, Peters, & Co. ; Moss & Co. — draw on 
Barclay, Bevan, & Co. ; Bank of Liverpool — draw 
on Glyn, Halifax^ & Co. ; Branch Bank of England 
— draw on Bank of England ; Liverpool Banking 
Co. — draw on Curries, & Co. ; Liverpool Borough 
Bank — draw on (xlyiij Halifax, & Co.; Liverpool 
Commercial Banking Co. — draw on Williams, 
Deacon, & Co. ; Branch of Manchester and Liver- 
pool District Banking Co. — draw on Smith, Payne, 
& Co. ; North and South Wales Bank — draw on 
London and Westminster; Royal Bank of Liver- 
pool—draw on London Joint Stock Bank ; Liver- 
pool Union Bank— draw on Cunliffes, Brooks, and 
Co. 

LIYERMERE (Little), Suffolk, a parish in 
the hun^- of Blackboum, union of Thingoe : 77 
miles from London, 4 from Ixworth.-«Me- ( For access 
and postal arrangements, see above.) -eMe^Contains 
1500 acres: 12 houses: pop*- in 1841, 172: ass'- 
props'- £1,368 ; poor rates in 1838, £201. Us. 

LIVERSEDGE, West Riding York, a chapelry 
in the parish of Birstall. — (which see for access, 
&c.): 188 miles from London, 7 from Huddersfield, 
6 from Halifax. -(Mo^Money orders issued at Hud- 
dersfield: London letters deliv^' 11 a.m. : post doses 
4 p.m. «a » c. The churoh is a beautiful edifice with a 
tower, nave, side aisles, and choir, in the style of 
the 15th century. One of the schools here is en- 
dowed with £14 a year. An Independent church 
was formed hero in 1789. During the great Lud- 
dite disturbances in 1816, one of the mills at Raw- 
fold, in this chapelry, belonging to Mr. W. Cart- 
wright, was attacked by the mob, but he, assisted 
by his dependents, stoutly repelled them, and two 
of the assailants were killed, and several wounded. 
This circumstance was of great public benefit in 
cheeking the violence of the rioters, and the inhabi- 
tants of the district presented Mr. Cartwright with 
£3,000 for his conduct and bravery .-eM*>The living, 
a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon : pros, 
net income, £150: patron. Vicar of Bristol: pres^ 
incumbent, T. Atkinson, 1842: contains 1,940 
acres: 1,047 houses: pop"- in 1841, 5,988: probable 
pop"- in 1849, 6,886: ass*- propi^- £7,841: poor 
rates in 1838, £1,157. 12s. 

LIVERTONi North Riding York, a parish in 
the east division of Langbaurgh liberty, union of 
Guisborough : 289 miles from London (coach road 
249), 6 from Guisborough, 13 from Whitby.^»«c.- 



Nor. West. Rail, through Rugby, Derby, and York 
to Whitby, thence 13 miles : from Derby, through 
York, &c., 157 miles.-o«o-Money orders issued at 
Guisborough: London letters deliv^l} p.m.: post 
closes, 10) a.m. -ofo. Contains 2,360 acres: 50 
houses: pop"* in 1841,203: ass** prop^- £1,543: 
poor rates in 1838, £93. Is. 

LIYESEY, Lahcaster, a township in the pa- 
rish of Blackburn — (which see for access, &c.) : 
209 miles from London, 2 ft-om Blackburn, 9 from 
Preston. -owa^ Money orders issued at Blackburn: 
London lettera issued 8 a.m. : post closes 6 p.m. 
-<»«o-Contain8 1,890 acres; 308 houses? pop"* in 
1841, 1,996: probable pot>»- in 1849, 2,296: ass*- 
propy- £3,979 : poor rates m 1838, £599. 16s. 

LLACHARN. See Laugharxe. 

LLAFERNOC or LAVERNOCK, Glamoroah, 
a parish in the hnn*- of Dinas Powys, union of 
Cardiff, on the coast of the Bristol Channel: 174 
miles from London (coach road 166), 6 from Car- 
diff, 13 from Cowbridge.-o«e^Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Cardiff, 
thence 5 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &c., 165 miles. Money orders is- 
sued at Cardiff: London letters deliv*- 10^ a.m. : 
post closes H p.m.^oM>Oontain8 13 houses: popl- 
in 1841, 85: ass*- prop^- £502: poor rates in 1838, 
£27. lis. 

LLAMPETER-FELPRET See Llarbedk- 
Felfret. 

LLAMPHEY, Pbmbrokb, a parish iu the hun*- 
of Castle-Martin, union of Pembroke, South Wales: 
269 miles from London (coach road 265) , 4 from 
Pembroke, 8 from Tenby. -o«s- Gt. West. Rail 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 55 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 260 miles. o >a 
Money orders issued at Pembroke : London letters 
deliv** 8ajn.: post doses 9 p.m.-o«c^The living 
(St. Faith), a disch*- Ticarage, in the arehd^- of 
Pembroke, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£5. 8s. 11 (d.: pres. net income, £102: patron, 
Bishop of St. David's : contains 61 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 407: ass*' prop^* £1,969: poor rates in 
1838, £186. 14s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLAMPHEY (or Lampha), Glamorgan, a ham- 
let in the parish eif St. Bride's Major — (which see 
for access, &c.) — South Wales: 173 miles from 
London, 2 from Cowbridge, 7 from Bridgend.*e9«o- 
Money orders issued at Cowbridge : London letters 
deliv* 11 a.m. : post closes 12^ p.m.-«>*o-Contain8 
31 houses: pop'- in 1841, 149. — (Other returns 
with the parish.) 

LLAN-ABER, Mkriometh, a parish in the han*- 
of Ardudwy, union of Dolgelly, North Wales: It 
includes the township of Gwem-y-Hywel : 232 
miles from London (coach road 225), 2 from Bar- 
mouth, S from Harlech. -e«>- Nor. West. Rail. 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to New- 
town, thence 45 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 137 miles. -«•«»► Money 
orders issued at Corwen : London letters deliv^ 3 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-o«^The living (St. Bod- 
van), a rectory, with the curacy of Biu'mouth, in 
the arehd'^' and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£11. 18s. 9d. : pres. net income, £213* patron, 
the CrowiQ : pres. incumbent, John Jones, 1831 : 
contains 228 houses : pop'^* in 1841, 1,709 : prob- 



alle pop^ in 1849, 1,965: ass*- prop^- £2,954: 
poor mtefl in 1838, £553. 14s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLAN-AFAN, Cardioak, a parisli in llie apper 
dmsion of the hon'* of Ilar, union of Aberystwitb, 
Sooth Wales: 210 mfles from London (coach road 
205), 10 from Aberystwith, 8 from Tregaron.-o*>- 
Gt West. Sail, through Stonehonse and Olonoes- 
ter to Ross, thence 80 miles: from Derhy, through 
Biimingham and Shre-vrsbnry to Newtown, 185, 
tiienoe 40 mnles.-<Me>.Money orders issued at Aher- 
yatwith: London letters deKv^ 6} p.m.: post 
doses 9 p.m.-«>«e^The living (St. Avan), a perpe- 
tual caracy in the archd^* of Cardigan, and diocese 
•f St. DaTid's, is valned at £3. 6s. 8d. : pres. net 
income, £88 : patron, T. P. B. Chichester, Esq[., 
M.P.ff pres. incumbent, D. £. Jones, 1835: con- 
tains 71 houses: pop"* in 1841, 411 : ass^ prop^- 
£695: poor rates in 1838, £52. ISs. 

LLAK- AFAN-FAWR, i^RScosr, a parish in the 
hun^ and union of BijOfh, South Wales: 182 
miles from London (coadh roa^ 181), 8 from 
Boihh, 10 from Bhayudor.-e^^-Gt. West. RmI. 
&Toagh Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, thence 
50 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gfloucester, &c., 173 m3es.^eM9>Money orders is- 
sued at Builth: London letters deUv^- 4 p.m.: 
post doses 5| p.m. * » ^ A Presbyterian church was 
formed here in 1670.-«**c^The living (St. Avan), 
a vicarage, with the Curacies of LUnafkn-fechan, 
Lhinvihangel, Abergwissnn, Llanvihangel-biyn- 
pabwan, in the archd^* of Bi^oon, and diocese of 
St David's, is valued at £9. 8s. 9d.: pres. net 
mcome, £273: patron, Bishop of St. David's: 
pres. incumbent, Daniel Evans, 1826: contains 
181 houses: pop^ in 1841, 975: ass** prop^* 
£3,706: poor rates in 1838, £362. 

LLAN-AFAN-FECHAN, Buscoir, a parish in 
the hun** and union of Builth, South Wales, on a 
branch of the Wye : 179 miles from London, 6 
ftom BuilCh, 16 from Llandovery.-c9»o-(For access 
and postal arrangements, see a(bove.) -omo- The 
living (St Avan) is a curacy, annexed to the vi- 
earage of Llan-Afan-Fawr: contains 31 houses: 
pop^- m 1841, 172 : ass*- prop^- £815 : poor rates 
m 1838, £44. 3s. 

LLANALL60LF, Avai^ESET, a chapelry in the 
parish of Llaneugrad — (which see for access, &c.) 
—North Wales, on the coast of St. George's Chan- 
nel: 261 miles firom London, 6 from Llanerchy- 
ncdd, 10 from Beaumaris.-oM^Money orders issued 
at Bangor : London ktters deliv^ 10 a.m. . post 
doses 2 p.m.-<3*o>There is an Independent chapel 
hcre.-o«>-The living (St. Gallgov) is a curacy, an- 
nexed to the rectory of Llaneugrad : contains 
77 bouses: pop"- in 1841, 384: ass*- prop^- £578: 
poor rates in 1838, £117. 12s. 

LLAN-AML-LLECH (or LLAimAtiT.Acn), Brb- 
OOT, a parish in the bun'*- of Pen-Kelly, union of 
Brecon, t^outh Wales, on the eastern iKink of the 
Usk, and crossed by the Newport and Brecknock 
Canal: it includes the hamlet of Llecfaen: 175 
miles from London (coach road 163), 4 from Brecon, 
10 from Crickhowel.-o«>Gt West Kail, through 
Stoneliouse and Gloucester to Chepstow, thence 35 
mUcs: from Derby, through Bnrminghara, Glouces- 
ter, &C., 166 miles .-o«o- Money orders issued at 
Brooon: London letters deliv^ 9} a.m. : post closes 



2} p.m.-«Me»There is a curious monument here, 
called Htut's Hermitage. The petty sessions for 
the hundred are generally held in the parish, •■p' 
The living (St Peter), a rectory in the archd'* of 
Brecon, and diocese of St. David's: patron, Rev. 
T. Powell: pres. incumbent, T. J. Powell, 1824: 
contains 59 houses: pop^ in 1841, 324: ass^ 
ptopy- £3,711 : poor rates in 1838, £19^ 7s. 

LLAN-ANDROS. See Pssstbion. 

LLAN-ANNO, Radkor, a parish in the hun^ 
and union of Knighton, South Wales : 218 miles 
from London (coach road 177), 11 from Newtown, 
12 from New Radnor.-««»-Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Newton, thence 
11 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Wol- 
verhampton, &c., 116 miles.-<3«c*.Money orders is- 
sued at Newtown: London letters deliv^ 3 p.m.: 
post closes 9} a.m.-«M>-The living (St Wonno, or 
Anno), a perpetual curacy, with that of Llanbadam 
Yynidd, m the aroh^- of Brecon, and diocese of St, 
David's, is valued at £10 : pres. net income, £150: 
patron, Chancellor of College Church, Brecon: 
pres. incumbent, J. R. Lewis, 1844: contains 50 
houses: pop^- in 1841, 329: ass^ prop^* £906: 
poor rates in 1838, £139. 19s. 

LLAN-ARMON, Carnakvov, a parish in the 
hun<^ of Evionydd, union of Pwllheli: 263 miles 
from London (coach road 239), 4 from Pwllheli, 
18 from Camarvon.-vMo^Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 25 miles : 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 173 miles.-oM** 
^oney orders issu^ at Pwllheli : London letters 
deliv*- llj a.m. : post closes 1^ p.m. -«•«»- The 
parochial charities produce about £5. 168. per an- 
num.-<Me-The living is a rectory, annexed to that 
ofLlan-Gybi: contains 106 houses: pop*'1nl841, 
589 : ass^ ptop^"- £2,310: poor rates in 1837, £243. 
18s. 

LLAN-ARMON, Dehbior, a parish in the hun^- 
of Yale, union of Ruthin, North Wales, on the river 
Alen : it includes the townships of Creigiog-lsylan, 
Creigiog-Uwchlan and Erwyrys : 198 miles from 
London (coach road 188), 5 from Ruthin, 12 from 
Wrexham.-o.«»^Nor. West Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Wrexham Regis, 
thence 11 miles : from Derby, through Stafford and 
Shrewsbury, to Wrexham, &c., 113 miles, "o w . 
Money orders issued at Ruthin: London letters 
deliv^' 10} a.m. : post closes 2} p.m.-c«(»-One of 
the schools here is endowed with £6 a year; the 
other charities produce about £40 a year. There 
are several tumuli in this parish, in which urns 
containing burnt bones have been fbund.-««o-The 
living (St. Garmon) : pres. net income, £282 : pa* 
tron, the Bishop: contains 294 houses: pop^* in 
1841, 1,823: probable pop"- in 1849, 2,096: t«s«* 
propy- £4,976: poor rates in 1838, £792. 9s. 

LLAN-ARMON, DYFFRYN-CEIRIOG, Dar- 
BiOH, a parish in the bun'* of Chirk, union of Cor- 
wen, North Wales, on the river Ceiriog : 187 miles 
from London (coach road 181), 10 from Oswestry, 
8 from LlangoUen.^-MO'Nor. West Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &c., 102 miles. -«»•«»- Money orders 
is^sued at Oswestry: London letters deliv^ 11 
a.m. : post closes 1 J p.m.-«>M»The living (St. Gter- 
manus), a disch^- rectory in the archd^- and diocese 



LLA 



a 



LLA 



of St. Asapb, is ralaed at £8. lis. 10}d.; pres, 
net income, £250 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : 
pres. incumbent, David Jones, 1848: contuns 65 
houses: pop*** in 1841,354: ass^ prop^- £1,121: 
poor rates in 1838, £114. 8s. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANARMON-MYNDD-MAWR, Denbigh, a 
parish in the hnn^* of Chirk, union of LlanfyUin, 
North Wales : 190 miles from London (coach road 
181), 8 from Llanfyllin, 16 from Bela.-«M>-Nor. 
West Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Oswestry, thence 13 miles: from Derby, 
through Burton, Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 105 
miles. -«>«o^Money orders issued at Oswestry : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 12} p.m. : post closes at noon. 
-o«e»-The living (St. Gannon), a perpetual curacy 
in the archd^* and diocese of St. Asaph : pres. net 
income, £64 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. 
Incumbent, W. £. Williams, 1826 : contains 29 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 182: ass''- propy'£779: 
poor rates in 1838, £68. 4s. 

LLAN-ARTH ^Nobth and South), Cabdiciah, a 
parish in the hun^ of Moeddyn, union of Aberay- 
on : the parish is divided into Upper and Lower 
divisions, and contains six hamlets: 228 miles 
from London (coach road 225) , 14 from Lampeter, 
18 from Cardigan.-a«>-Gk. West. Rail, through 
Oxford to Worcester, thence 110 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham to Worcester, &c., 
181 mile8.-«Me-Money orders issued at Lampeter : 
London letters deliv*^ 7} p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
The living (St. Vylltyg), a vicarage, with that of 
Llanina, in the archd^- of Cardigan, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £4. ISs. l^d. : pres. net 
income, £114: patron. Bishop of St. David's: 
pres. incumbent, David Evans, 1822: contains 
517 houses : pop"* in 1841, 2,421 : probable pop"- 
in 1849, 2,784: ass*"- prop^- £4,210: poor rates in 
1838, £968. 8s.^o««^Fair, Sept 22, for horses, cat- 
tle, &c. 

LLANARTH, Monmouth, a parish in the hun^- 
of Abergavenny and Ragland, union of Aber- 
gavenny: it includes the hamlet of Clytha: 152 
miles from London (coach road 140), 4 from Rag- 
land, 6 from Abergavenny.-c»»ei-Gt. West Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 143 miles.^o«o>Money orders 
issued at Monmouth: London letters deliv^* 9} 
a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-««oThere is a Roman 
Catholic chapel here. The parochial charities pro- 
duce about £23 a year.^o^e-The living, a disch*** 
vicarage, with the curacy of Bettws-Newydd, in 
the archd^' and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at 
£10« 3s. 4d. : pres. net income, £285: patron. 
Dean and Chapter of Llandaff: pres. incumbent, 
William Price, 1838: contains 3,540 acres: 115 
houses: pop" in 1841, 669: ass**- prop^- £1,996: 
poor rates in 1838, £458. 14s.-o«»-Llaiiarth Court 
is the seat of John Arthur Herbert, £sq., who is 
the representative of the senior branch of the 
great house of Herbert, which derived its origin 
from Howel, third son of William-ap-Jenkin, alias 
Herbert, Lord of Gwarindee, who lived in the time 
of Edward III. Mr. Jones, who numbers among his 
ancestors some of the most distinguished of our 
English nobility, bears a shield with twenty quar- 
terings. 



LLAN-ARTHNE (or Llan-Abthney), Carmab- 
THEN, a parish in the hun^ of IskemeUf union of 
Carmarthen, on the river Towy : 226 miles from 
London (coach road 208) , 8 from Carmarthen, 20 
from Lampeter.«oM»>Gt. West Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Swansea, thence 18 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &g., 
217 miles.-«Me-Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv^ 4} p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-oMs^The village is romantically situated. The 
church is in ruins, but there are two Calvinistio 
Methodist churches here. ^om>- The living (St 
David), a disch^ vicarage in the diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £8 : pres. net income, £170 : 
patron. Bishop of St David's: pres. incumbent, 
John Taylor, 1816 : contains 397 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 2,171 : probable pop"- in 1849, 2,496 : ass**- 
prop^- £5,641 : poor rates in 1838, £730. 186.^=>«e^ 
Middleton Hall. 

LLA N- ASAPH (or Llan-Asa), Flint, a parish 
in the hun^ of Prestatyn, union of Holywell, 
North Wales, west of the itver Dee : 201 miles from 
London (coach road 204), 6 from Holywell, 8 from 
St. A8aph.-oM>-Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Holywell, thence 6 miles: from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 101 miles. -o*o.Money 
orders issued at Holywell : London letters deliv*^- 
8} a.m. : post closes 5} p.m.^o«o-One of the schools 
here has an endowment of £22 a year; the other 
charities produce about £15 a year. Coal and 
other valuable minerals are wrought here to a con- 
siderable extent. There is a signal tower on St 
Asaph hill, and a lighthouse on the point of Air, at 
the mouth of the river Dee. It contains two fixed 
lights, one 49 feet above high water mark, which 
can be seen at the distance of eleven miles in clear 
weather. The other is only intended for the navi- 
gation of vessels over the Hoyle Sands, and is 12 
feet above the water.-eM»>The living (St. Kentigem 
and Asaph), a vicarage in the archd^- and diocese 
of St. Asaph, is valued at £9. lis. 5jd. : pres. net 
income, £297 : patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. 
incumbent, Henry Parry, 1798 : contains 457 
houses : pop"* in 1841, 2,669 : probable pop"- in 
1849, 3,069: ass*- prop^- £5,038: poor rates in 
1838, £536. 6s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLAN-BABO, Angleset, a parish in the hun^- 
of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, North Wales : 
274 miles from London (coach road 271), 4 frt)m 
Llanerchyraidd, 11 from Holyhead.-o«e-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, 
thence 11 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
174 miles. -o«9- Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv** 9} a.m.: post closes 2} p.m. 
q« p Tho church is believed to be very ancient, for 
tradition refers its origin to Prince Babo Post Pry- 
dain, who supported the Britons against the Picts 
and Scots, in 460, and whose tomb is still pointed 
out in the church.-e«>-The living (St. Pabo), a 
curacy annexed to the rectory of Llanddewsaint : 
contains 27 houses: pop"- in 1841, 155: ass^- 
prop7- £718: poor rates in 1838, £63. 19s. 

LLANBADARN-FACH. See Llanbadark- 
Teef-Eolws. 

LLANBADARN-FAWR, Cabdioan, a parish, 
partly in the upper division of the hun'* of liar, 
and partly in the liun*- of Genaur-Glyn, union of 
Aberystwith, South Wales: the parish includes 






th« townships of BroncasteUsn, Cluach, Cwmrhei- 
dol, Eleieli, Mdin-dwr, Farcel-Canol, TxeSeinSt 
Uciuiyn-y-dro, Vauior>Uc2uif, Yainor-IsBa, (md In* 
y-dr&-Iaa% the humletB of Uanbadam-y-C^yddeii 
Isaf, and Ucbaf, and the ehapehry of Aberys^with : 
208 mS\m from London (coach road 212), 1 fioin 
Aberystwith, 17 horn Tregaron. -<»«=^CH;. West;. 
Bail. Uuongh Oxford to Worcester, thence 90 mil^; 
fipom Derby, through BirmiBgham, Worcester, &c., 
161 miles.«oM»>Money orders issued at Aherystwitb ; 
London letters deliv^ 4^ p.m.; post clofi«8 9 p.xD^ 
B ip The cknroh is a spacioiis crooif orm stmctore, 
wilh a heavy tower at the west end; it is in the 
Early English style, and is sapposed, from its 
pointed arches, to hare been bnilt shortly after the 
Norman Gmqaest. There was formerly f^ bishoprie 
here, fiMinded by St. Patfdmna, a foreigner $ but the 
inhafaitantB having, in a fend, killed their bishop, 
the see was united to that of St Dayid's, and the 
chnreh, with its revepiies, was given by Gilbert 
Strongbow, in 1111, to the estaJ^lishment of 8t. 
Peter's at Gloueester, and afterwards to the abbey 
of Yale Bpyal, in Cheshire. There is an Indepen- 
deBt chapel, and seveial Calvinistic Hethqdiqt 
oSiapels in the town. The parodiial charities pro- 
duce about £24 a year, whieh ate applied to edu- 
eational porposes. Theie was formoriy a maifcet 
here, but that has been transferred to Aberystwitb^ 
The parish is very extensive, beiaig as much as 
fifteen miles in length, and six in average bjreadth. 
A Soman road passes through it, and the outline 
of several tumuli can be traced in the neighbour- 
hood. Lewis Monia, the celebrated Wel& anti- 
quavy, was long a resident In this {dace. He was 
bom in 1702, the son of a pmall trader, and rose 
by skill and perseveranoe to be largely wao^ployed 
under government as the surveyor of mines, and 
other p^per^ of the crown.-««»-The living (St. 
Pladani) , a diach^ vicarage in the arohd^- of Cardi* 
gan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at J&20 : 
pres. net income, X135: patron, Bishop cff St. 
David's; pres. incumbent, John HugheSt 1834: 
oonrtains 1,460 houses : i^o^ in 1841, 11.239 : 
probaUe pop"- in 1849, 12,925: SLfiu'^- prop^ 
£20,625: poor lates in 1838, £2,431. 6s, 

LLANBADASNFAWR, Radros, a paidsh in 
the hon^ of KevenUoece, union of Bbayador, South 
Wales, on the river Ithon : 183 miles firom Loo- 
don (coach road 174), 3 Drom Pen-y-Bout, 7 from 
Bhayadery^»«ci.at. West. Bail through Oxford to 
Wiiroeator, thenpe 65 mUest yirom D^y, through 
Birmingham, Woffcester,&c., 136 mUes.-e«>^Money 
orders isaned at Bbayader: London letters deUv*'- 
11} ajn. s post cloAM 12} p.m.*««»-T!he charities 
pnoduee about £1 per «auum.-e«»-The living (St. 
Patenms), a-disoh''' rectory in the arohd^'.of Btecon, 
and dioeese of St* David's, is valued at £7. 12a. 
6d. - proa. n«t in6ome» £268 : patlwn, Bishop gf 
8t David's: praa. inenmbent» L. P. Jones, 1832: 
oontaiad 74 hawee: pop^- in I84I1 448^ asB<>- 
prop': £1,668 : pettf rates in 1838, £128. 168. 

LLANBADASN-FYNDD, Baveoe, a parish in 
the hon^ and onion of Knightov, ^uth Walet, 
near the rivers Teme, Ithon, and Aran : 168 miles 
firam London, 8 from Newtown, 10 £tQm Rhayader. 
^o«»-Qt. West. BaiL through Ozfbrd to Woicester, 
thence 50 milea: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Woroeater, te^ 121 mile8.-o«>-Money orders 



issued at Newtown : London letter* deliv^ 2 p.m : 
post closes lOJ a.m,-o««»-The living (St. Padarn opr 
Patemus), a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of 
Llananno: contains 90 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
610: ass*^ piop^- £1,632; ppor rates in 1837, 
£183. 128. 

LLANBADABN-ODYN, CAnnioAN, a parish in 
the hun'* of Penarth, union of Tregaron, on the 
eastern bank of the Teifi : 252 miles from London 
(eoach road 226), 4 from Tregaron, 11 from Lam- 
peter.^-9M».Nor. West. Bail, through Wolverhamp- 
ton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 40 miles ; 
from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &e., 
167 miles. -«3«eN.]iiloney orders issued at Lampeter : 
London letters deliv°- 7 p.m. - post closes 9 p.m- 
-c»c>^There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here, 
-a«>-The living, a curacy, annexed to the perpetual 
curacy of Llaudewi-Brefi : contains 112 bouses: 
pop"- in 1841, 504: ass*- prop^- £1,610: poor 
rates in 1838, £67. 9s. 

LLANBADARN-TBEF-EGLWS (or Llahba- 
nABn-FAcn), Cardigan, a parish in the hui^*** of 
Uar, union of Aberayron, South Wales : 272 miles 
from London (coach road 243), 12 from Lampeter, 
16 from AberyBtwith.^o»e»>Nor. West Bail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, 
thence 60 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &o., 187 miles. -o«o- Money orders 
issued at Lampeter: London letters deliv'^- 7 p.m.: 
post closes 9 p.m.'-o«>-Tbere are two Galvinistic 
Methodist chapels hero.-oM»-The living (St. Pa- 
dam), a disch*** vicarage, in the archd^* of Cardigan, 
and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £Q : pres. 
net incpme, £45 : patron, Bishojp of St. David's : 
pres. incumbent, J. Jam^s, 1838: contains 202 
houfliBs: pop°- in 1841, 1,045: ass^ prop^* £1,650: 
poor rates in 1837, £231. 196. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANBADABN-y-CBEIDDYN-ISAF, Cabw- 
«Ajr, a hamlet in the pariah of Llanbadam-Fawr — 
(which 8ee for access, &c.) : 212 miles from Iion- 
don, 2 from Aberystwith, 18 from Machynleth. 
oBci Money orders issued at Aberystwith : Londou 
letters deliv'- 3} p.m.: post closes 7i a.m.-«M»- 
Contalna 174 houses: pop°- in 1841, 883; ass<*- 
pr^- £3,680: poor rates in 1837, £239. 68. 

LLANBADABN-Y-CBEIDD YN-UCH AF, Ca«. 
DioAH, a hamlet in the parish of Llanbadam-Fawr : 
.212 miles from London.-e«c^(For access and postal 
arrangements, see above. )*e«><;;on tains 127 Rouses; 
pop"- in 1841, 627: ass^ prop^- £1,830: poor rates 
in 1837, £242. 8s. 

LLANBADABN-Y-aARB£G, Baditob, a pariah 
in the hun'^of Colwyn, union of Builtb, South 
Wales, OB 9k branch of the Wye : 178 miles from 
Loindon (coach road 165), 5 from BuUth, 9 from 
Hay.-o.o-^. West. Rail, through Oxford to Wor- 
cester, thence^ miles: from Derby* through Bir- 
mingham, Worcester, &c., 131 miles.-««o-Money 
orders issued at Builth: London letters deliv^- 3} 
p.ra.3 poBtcloBe8 6 p.m.-«*=>-The parochial bene- 
factions produce about £4 per annum. -««>*The liv- 
ing (St. Padam), a curacy subordinate to the rec- 
tory of Gregrina: conteins 20 houses; pop"* in 
1841. 81; ass'^' prop)^- £303: poor rates in 1837, 
£47. 2s. 

LLANBADOCK, Movmouth, a parish in the 
lower division of the hun^- of Usk, union of Pont- 



vofL.ro. 



LLA 



10 



LLA 



y-Pool, on the river Usk: 150 miles from London 
(coach road 144), 2 from Usk, 4 from Pont-y-Pool. 
•«Mo-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehonse and Glou- 
cester to Chepstow, thence 10 miles : from Derhy, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 141 miles. 
*e9«o-Money orders issued at Usk : London letters 
deliv*- 8J a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o«e^The paro- 
chial charities produce ahout £15 a year.-oM^^The 
living is a perpetual curacy, in the diocese of Llan> 
daff: pres. net income, £72: patron, Rev. T. A. 
Williams: contains 3,430 acres : 72 houses: pop*** 
in 1841, 547: ass*- prop^- £2,832: poor rates in 
1838, £255. 18s. 

LLANBADRIG, Anqleset, a parish in the hun^ 
of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, North Wales, 
on the coast of the Irish Sea : the parish includes 
the township of Cemmaes and Oygyrog : 283 miles 
from London (coach road 275), 5 from Amlwch, 20 
from Holyhead. -«*»- Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, thence 20 miles : 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 183 miles.-o*o- 
Money orders issued at Bangor: London letters 
deliv* 11 a.m. : post closes 1 p.m.-««<»-The church, 
which is certainly very ancient, is reported to have 
been built by St. Patrick, in 4^, when on his way 
to Ireland. Small quantities of yellow ochre and 
copper ore have been found in the parieh.-oM^The 
living (St. Patrick), a disch**- vicarage, in the 
archd'* of Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor, is 
valued at £7. 8s. Ijd. : pres. net income, £169: 
patron. Lord Chancellor: pres. incumbent, E. O. 
Hughes, 1833: contains 255 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 1,295: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,489: ass*- 
propy- £2,930 : poor rates in 1838, £492. 128. 

LLANBADRIG (or Llanbedroo), Cabnarvoit, 
a parish in the hun*- of Gyfflogion, union of Pwll- 
heli, North Wales : 273 miles from London (coach 
load 247), 4 from PwllheU, 10 from Nevm.-3.c^ 
Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester to 
Bangor, thence 35 miles: from Derby, through 
Crowe, &c., 173 miles.-o«»-Money orders issued at 
Pwllheli: London letters deliv*- 11) a.m. : post 
closes 1) p.m.-oM>-It is a rude uncultivated region, 
containing about ^yq squaro mile8.-e*»-The living 
(St Pedroc), a roctory, with thtf cunfoies of Llanfi- 
hangel Bachallaeth and Llangian, in the archd^- 
and diocese of Bangor: pres. net income, £385; 
patron, Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, John 
Owen, 1838: contains 87 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
524: ass** prop^"* £1,631: poor rates in 1838, 
£136. 10s. 

LLANBEBLIG, Carnarvon, a parish in the hun** 
of Is-Gorfai, union of Carnarvon, North Wales i 
the parish lies on the river Seiont, and includes 
the borough of Carnarvon, and the townships of 
Bout Newydd and Treflan : 247 miles from London 
(coach road 244), 1 from Carnarvon, 9 from Bangor. 
-©•o-Nor. West. Rail, through. Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thence 9 miles < from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 147 miles.-«Me-Money orders issued at 
Carnarvon: London letters deliv** 9 a.m.; post 
closes 4ci p.m.-e«»»The churoh of Llanbeblig is a 
spacious cruciform structure. The chapel of St. 
Mary's, formerly the garrison chapel, is situated 
in the town of Carnarvon, in which the services 
are in English. The Calvlnistic Methodists have 
two chapels here.-o«=^The living (St. Peblic), a 
disch*' vicarage, with the curacies of Carnarvon 



and WaenfawT, In the arohd^* of Anglesey, and 
diocese of Bangor, is valued at £12. 58. 5d.; pres. 
net income, £330: patron. Bishop of Chester: pres. 
incumbent, T. Thomas, 1835; pop"- in 1841, 9,192: 
probable pop"* in 1849, 10,671. 

LLANBEDR, Brecon, a parish in the hun*- and 
union of Crickhowel, South Wales, situated most 
romantically on the river Grwyney : the parish in- 
cludes the parcels of Bysych and Graigwen: 162 
miles from London (coach road 159), 3 from 
Crickhowel, 7 from Abergavenny .-©•o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehonse and Gloucester to Chep- 
stow, thence 22 miles from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 153 ml1es.-««<»-Money 
orders issued at Crickhowel : London letters deliv** 
8 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«M>-The tower of the 
churoh once formed part of a structure much more 
ancient than the present churoh. Okie of the 
schools here was endowed in 1728 by Mrs. Her- 
bert, with £28 per annum, ^o^i- The living (St. 
Peter), a rectory, with the curacy of Partrishow, 
in the arohd''' and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £16. 178. 6d. : pres. net income, £154: patron, 
Duke of Beaufort: pres. incumbent, £. Lewis, 
1832: contains 72 houses: pop" in 1841, 290: 
ass*- props'- £1,849 : poor rates in 1838, £104. 48. 

LLANBEDR, Merioneth, a parish in the hun*- 
of Ardudwy, union of Festiniog, North Wales : 232 
miles from London (coach road 228), 3 from Har- 
lech, 7 from Barmouth, --•ot^ Nor. West. RaiL 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Os- 
westry, thence 55 miles: from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 147 miles.-««o-Money 
orders issued at Corwen : London letters deliv*- 5} 
p.m. : post closes 7 p.m.-ow^Two of the schools 
here are supported by endowments arising from 
£1,000 left by Mrs. Parry .-<»«»-The living, a curacy 
annexed to the vicarage of Llandanwg : contains 
77 houses : pop"- in 1841, 404< poor rates in 1838, 
£56. lis. 

LLANBEDR, Monmouth, a chapelry in the 
parish of Llanmartin — (which see for access, &c.) : 
148 miles from London, 4 from Caerleon, 12 from 
Chepstow.-«>M»>Money orders issued at Newport : 
London letters deliv** 10 a.m. : post closes 2} p.m. 
-««e»-The chapel is now in ruin8.-««o-The living, a 
curacy in the arohd^- and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £6. lis. 5id.: pop"- in 1841, 220.— 
(Returns with Langstone.) 

LLANBEDR, Radnor, a parish in the bun*- of 
Pain's Castle, union of Hay, South Wales, on a 
branch of the Wye : 167 miles from London (coach 
road 163), 7 from Hay, 7 from Builth.^Me^Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehonse and Gloucester to 
Ross, thence 35 miles : firom Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 158 mile8.-oM»>Money 
orders issued at Hay : London letters deliv*- 11} 
a.m.: post closes 11} a.m.^e«»The living (St. 
Peter), a perpetual curacy in the aichd^* of Brecon, 
and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £8 : pres. 
net income, £68 : patron. Bishop of St. David's : 
pres. incumbent, E. Lewis, 1831 : contains 50 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 348: ass*- prop^ £1,548: 
poor rates in 1838, £188. 3s. 

LLANBEDR-DYFFRYN-CLWYD, Dbnbioh, 
a parish in the hun*- and union of Ruthin, North 
Wales, on the river Clydd : 199 miles from London 
(coach road 206) , 1 from Ruthin, 9 from Denbigh. 



-e«o>Nor. West Bail, through Grewe to Chester, 
thenoe 18 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, 
Chester, &c., 99 miles.^o«o>Money orders issned at 
Bnthin: London letters deliv^* 9} a.m. : post closes 
3} p.m. ■a i o otc The living (St Peter), a rectory 
in the aichd^* and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£13. Is. 8d.: pres. net. income, £340: patron, 
Bishop of Bangor: pres. incombent, £. Thelwall, 
1834: contains 80 honses: pop"- in 1841, 522: 
•8B*- propJ'- £2,747 : poof rates in 1838, £565. 10s. 
^e«>-L]anbedr Hall is the seat of Joseph Ablett, 
£iq., who was high sheriff in 1809, and is now a 
magistiate for the coonty. Mr. Ablett is the re- 
presentative of a very ancient family. — Here also 
is the leddenoe of the rector, the Rev. Edward 
Thelwall, the representative of one of the oldest 
ftmilies of Englidi extraction in North Wales. 

LLANBEDR-GOCH, Aholbsbt, a parish in the 
him^ of T^daethwy, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales, near the Bed Wharfe Bay: 246 miles from 
London (coach road 259), 7 from Beaumaris, 8 
fitom Bangor.-oM>^Nor. West Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Bangor, thence 8 miles: from 
Derby, througfa Crewe, &o., 146 miles.-o««»-Money 
orders issued at Beaumaris: London letters deliv<^ 
10 a.m.: poet closes 3^ p.m.^e«=>-Lime8tone is 
found to a great extent in the parish.^3Mo>The liv- 
ing (St Peter) is a curacy annexed to the rectory 
of Uanddyffhan: contains 88 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 407 : ass'- prop^"- £663: poor rates in 1838, 
£230. 18s- 

LLANBEDK-FELFREY (or Llahpeteb-Fel- 
pixt), Pkmbbokb, a parish in the hun*** and union 
ofNarfaeth, South Wales: 259 miles from London 
{oouAk road 251), 3 from Narbeth, 10 from Tenby. 
^«>«>-(H. West Rail, through Stonehouse and 
GloQcester to Swansea, thence 45 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
250 miles. a »o Money orders issued at Narbeth : 
L(»idon letters deliv'* 9 pjn. : post closes 8} p.m. 
-•"o-The living (St. Peter), a rectory in the 
ardu^- and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£10: pres. net income, £470: patron. Lord Chan- 
oellar: pres. incumbent, William Seaton, 1830: 
oontains 191 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 1,025: ass^ 
propT- £4,694: poor rates in 1838, £405. 18s. 

LLANBEDR-Y-CENNIN, Cajutarvon, a parish 
in the hnn^ of Isaf, union of Conway, North Wales, 
west of the rirer Conway : it includes the town- 
ships of Ardda, Dol-y-6arrog, Tal-y-Ca(n, and 
TJanbedr; 228 miles from London (coach road 
223), 6 Iran Llanrwst, 4 from Conway.-oM>-Nor. 
West Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Conway, 
thenee 4 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
128 niilefl.-<Mo>Mon«y orders issued at Conway: 
London letters deliv'- 3 p.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-««>-The living (St Peter), a rectory, with the 
icetory of Caer- Hun, in the archd'* and diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £6. 19s. 4d. : pres. net in- 
come, £289 : patron. Bishop of Bangor : pres. in- 
eambent, J. Hamer, 1826: contains 98 houses: 
pop^ in 1841, 456 : ass^* prop^- £1,556 : poor rates 
in 1838, £191.-»«:-Fur, Oct 3. 

LLANBEDROG. See LLAxnADBio. 

LLANBEDR (or Lampbtss-Pokt- Stephen), 
Casoioav, a parish, borough, and market town in 
the hon^ of Moeddyn and Troedyraur, union of 
Lampeter, South Wales : 214 miles from London 



(coach road 211), 10 from Tregaron. -om>- Ot 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Cardiff, to Merthyr Tydvil, thenoe 45 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 205 
miles.-o««»-Money orders issued here : London let- 
ters deliv^- 4 p.m.: post closes 7^ a.m.-*Me>-But 
very little is known respecting the origin of the 
borough, but it is generally believed that its desig- 
nation is derived from a church dedicated to St 
Peter, and there are abundant indications of its 
having at one time been a place of much greater 
consequence than it is at present, the inhabitants 
being occasionally spoken of in the Welsh Chroni- 
cles as persons of considerable importance. To- 
ward, the west of the town, leaden coffins have 
been at different times dug up in a place supposed 
to have been the cemetery of St Thomas's dmrch, 
of which nothing at the present day remains. A 
priory, it is believed, once stood where the priory 
house and garden now are. The fortress of the 
lords of the district stood at some distance to the 
westward of the town, and there are now two large 
mounts enclosed by fosses in the vicinity. A bridge, 
which spans the river about half a mile south 
of the town, is said to have been originally erected 
by King Stephen, and a field close by it still bears 
the appellation of the King's Meadow. A Roman 
road ran across the common, and there was a Ro- 
man camp at Olwer. Lampeter consists princi- 
pally of one long street, and its appearance has 
been greatly improved since the foundation of St. 
David's College; many respectable houses have 
been erected, and there is a commodious market- 
house and inn, and several other places for com- 
fortable accommodation. The church, which is 
very ancient, is pleasingly situated upon a rising 
ground, a little to the north ef the town ; it con- 
sists of a nave, side aisle, and ehancel, the two 
former being separated by a row of pointed arches, 
while the latter is divided from them by an ela- 
borately carved screen. The college of St. Da- 
vid's stands on an elevated site to the eastward of 
the town. It is a fine quadrangular building, and 
the chief ornament of the place, and was completed 
and opened in 1827, chiefly through the exertions 
of Dr. Burgess, at that time bishop of St. David's, 
and afterwards bishop of Salisbury, at a cost of 
about £20,000. Of that sum, £6,000 were con- 
tributed by government, £1,000 by King George 
lY., and ^e remainder was the produce of sub- 
scriptions collected by the bishop during the 
twenty yeajrs in which he had been labouring for 
this object The college is incorporated by royal 
charter, and the bishop of St. David's is appointed 
visitor. It is endowed with six livings, and con- 
tains a house for the principal, apartments for the 
visitor, rooms for the professors, and accommoda- 
tion for about seventy students, besides the chapel 
hall, a library containing upwards of 18,000 vo- 
lumes, with the customary college offices. The 
students of St. David's, like those of St. Bees' and 
Cowbridge, have the privilege of direct admission 
into holy orders. There is a detached residence 
for the vice-principal. The college is endowed 
with six livings, and since the year 1830 it has 
had several scholarships attached to it. Four of 
these of £10 each were annually provided for dur- 
ing his life by the late bishop of Salisbury; who 



I— 

r- 



LLA 



fMher, at his death, left hie lihrary of 9,000 to- 
Inmes to the oollege. His widow, Mrs. Bnrgess, 
Lord De DunstanTille, and several other mimifi- 
oent persons of property and oondition, have, at 
yarious times, contrihuted to the fonds of the in- 
stitution, so that the scholarships range from £10 
to £16 a year. The trade of Lampeter, as might 
be supposed, is chiefly of a local cihanraeter, eon^ 
sisting simply in the reeeSpt ttnd snpply of neces- 
saries for the ordinary bnnness of life; bat there is 
a lead mine in the vicinity belonging to Lord Ckr- 
rington, the ore of which contains a considerable 
per centage of silver. The borough of Lampeter 
is co-extensive with the lordship or manor, but the 
palish extends considerably beyond this In every 
directioo4 Charters were granted to this place as 
early as ti)e time of Edward IL, bat the chief 
governing pOwer is derived from a grant of George 
III., or rather the Prince Regent, in 1814, and 
under it courts leet were ordered to be held every 
Michaelmas and Easter. The quarter sessions for 
the county are also held here. There are Wes- 
leyan and Gadlvinistic Methodist chapels here; Ga- 
pel Lamped chapel was founded in 177-0. Under 
the Reform Act, Lampeter, ih conjunction with 
Oardigan. Adpar, and Aberystwyth^ returns one 
member to parliament. Lampeter is also one of 
the polling-places for the coonty member.-««<»>The 
living (St. Peter)f a diseh^* vicarage in the archd^* 
and dioeese of 8t. David's, is valued at £6. 13b. 
4d. : pres. net income, £240 : patron. Bishop of 
St. David's: pres. incumbent, L. Lewellin, 1838: 
contains 245 houses : pop"< in 1841, 1,507: ass' 
propy- £3,900 : poor rates in 1888, £487. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. -««=>- Market day, Tuesday. 
Fairs J Jan. 11, Feb. 6, May 8, Whit- Wednesday, 
July 10, Aug. 27, Saturday after Aug. 11, Satur- 
day after Sept. 11, Sept. 26, Ck^t. 19, Saturday 
after Nov. 12; cattle, horses, pigs, sheep. -om>* 
Bankers : D. Jones & Co. — draw on Jones, Loyd, 
& Co.-«*o^Lion Hotel. 

LLANBERRIS (or Lijlmperts), Carkarvok, a 
parish in the bun'* of Is-Qorfai, union of Carnar- 
von, North Wales : 246 miles from London (coach 
road 227), 10 from Carnarvon, 8 from Bang<or. 
-«««=^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thonce 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Cre^e, &o., 146 miles.-oM>>Money orders issued at 
Carnarvon : London letters deliv'- 11} a.m. : post 
closes 2i p.m.^c>«c^The parish includes the gloomy 
valley of the Pass of Llanberris; and a new village 
has sprung up, Which is principally supported by 
tourists who resort to this neighbourhood for some 
of the finest scenery in Wales. The mountains 
around are lofty and rugged, and in the bosom of 
the valley there are two small romantic lakes, one 
of which, fed by the river Afon Hwch, falls in one 
place in a beautiful cataract 60 feet in height. On 
the east the pass is bounded by Glider Fawr, and 
on the west by Snowdon. In the middle of the 
pass is the ancient castle of Dolbadem, which was 
for upwards of twenty years the prison of Owen 
Goich, brother of Llewellyn, the last Prince of 
Wales. Copper mines and elate quarries are nu- 
merous in the parish, and afford employment to a 
great number of persons ; the products being con- 
veyed in flats along the lakes, at the termination 
of which they are transferred to railway, by which 



12 IAjA 

they are carried to Moel-y-Don, on the Menai 
Strait, whence they are shipped for exportation. 
■o«oThe living (St. Peris), a disch** rectory in the 
archd'* and diocese of Bangor, is valued aA £4. 
18s. 9d. ; pres. net income, £182 : patron. Bishop 
of Bangor: pres. incumbent, W. L. Williams, 
1843: contains 127 houses: pop^ in 1841, 1,024: 
ass^L prop}"- £1,036: poor rates la 1838, £198. 
8s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANBOlDIr (Upper* and Lower), Oarmar* 
THSH, a parish in the hun^ of Derllys, union of 
Narbeth, South Wales, on a bdmch of the river 
Taff: 249 miles fh)m London (coach road 248), 
7 from St. Clears, 9 fhmi Narbeth.-^-^^Ot Wust. 
RaO. through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Cliep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 35 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Qloucester, dec, 240 miles. 
-o*»-Money orders issued at St. Clears : London 
letters dcliv** 8 p.m. : post doses 8 p.m.-o«e»-The 
living, a disch^ vicarage in the ardid^* of Car- 
marthen, and ^ocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£8: pres. net income, £136: patron^ Bishop of 
St. David's: pres. incumbent, J. Evans, 1827: 
contains 341 houses: pop*- in 1841, 1,789: pro- 
bable pop"- in 1849, 2,067: afis**- prop^- £6,740: 
poor rates in 1838, £904. Tithes commuted in 
1889. 

LLANBEULAN, ANaLssET, a parish in the 
hun'*- of Llifon and Malltraeth, union of Anglesey, 
North Wales: 253 miles froni- London (coach road 
251), 12 from Holyhead, 5 from Aberfraw.^«*o. 
Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester to 
Bodorgan station, thence 2 miles: from Derby, 
through Crewe and Chester, &c., 163 miles.-^Mo* 
Money orders issued at Holyhead : London letters 
deliv^' 10 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m. 3 »a The church, 
which is very ancient, is said to have been built aa 
early as the year 630.-e«oThe living (St. Peulan), 
a rectoiy with ^e chapelries of IJanerchymedd, 
Llanvaelog, Lleohylched, and Ceirchiog, in the 
arehd^' and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£22. 3s. ll)d.: pres. net income, £793: patron, 
Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, J. W. Trevor, 
1835: contahks 62 houses: pop<^ in 1841, 314: 
ass*^ pmp7- £1,651 : poor rates In 1838, £285. 17b. 

LLANBISTER, Radnor, a parish and township 
in the hun^ of Knighton and Kevenlleece, union o£ 
Knighton, South Wales. It includes tiie townships 
of Bronllis, Caroge, Cevenpawl, Cwmlechwedd, 
Cwmygaist, Gollan, and Llanbister, and is divided 
into Upper and Lower Llanbister: 178 miles from 
London (coach road 165), 14 from Presteign, 10 
from New Radnor.-««>-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Oxford to Worcester, thence 60 miles: from Deriay, 
through Birmingham and Worcester, &c., lol 
miles. -oK^-Money orders issued at Presteign : Lon* 
letters deliv^ 2 p.m. : tK>st doses 9^ a.m.-*>M«>*Ooe 
of the schools here is endowed with £4 a year. 
The other charities produce about £3. 16s. per 
annum. There is a Baptist chi^l here.-e«o^The liv- 
ing (St. Kynlog), adischarged vioaragein theaichd'* 
of Brecon, and diocese of St. David^s, is valued 
at £6. lis. 5}d.: pres. net income, £148: patron, 
Bishop of St. David's: pres, incumbent, E^an 
Powell, 1839: contains 250 houses: pop**- in 1841. 
1122: probable pop"- in 1849, 1290: poor rates in 
1838, £560. Is. Tithes of Upper Llanbister bom. 
muted in 1839. 






LLA 



13 



LLA 



LLANBLEIDDIAN, (or Li^hblbthtan), Gla- 
HoioAH, a parifth in the him'' of Cowbridgc, onion 
of Bridgend and CowbridgOf South Wales, on the 
western hank of therirer Cowhridge: 185 miles 
from London (ooaeh road 173), 1 from Cowhridge, 

7 iTom Bridgend. ^o«e^Ot. West. RmI. through 
fltofneboase, Qlovieester, and Chepstow, to Cow- 
Inidge Ifioad station, thence 5 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham and drloncester, &c., 176 
mile8.«<M«»-The sum of £20 firom a bequest of Sat 
Leoline Jenkins, is distrihitted ereiy fourth jeax 
among the poor; the other charities produce about 
£45 a year, part of which amount is applied to 
parochial purposes. The parish is embellished by 
tiM pictniwsque rains of an anoient castle which 
was giren to the family of 8t. Quintin on the par- 
tMan of (jfrlamorgaashire, hot 1^ whom it was 
erected is not known. The remains consist prin- 
eipally of the chief gateway, which, with its lofty 
iiry'-mantled towers, shows the original extent of 
the edffiee There is an Independent chapel here. 
-o«>^The living (8t. Bleddian), a discharged vica- 
rage, with the annexed parishes of Gowbridge and 
Welsh St. Donatts, in the archd^' and diocese of 
Lbmdaff, is valued at £10. 3s. 4d. : pros, net income, 
£279: patron, Dean and Chapter of Gloucester: 
pree. inodmhent, T. Edmondes, 1835: contains 146 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 724 : ass^* pr<^- £4049 : poor 
rates in 1838, £302. 138.^o«c^The geUtlemen's 
seats are Marlborough Grange, the property of, and 
ooeupied by Capt. Hugh Eiutwisle, R.N.; Cross- 
ways Lodge, occupied 1^ Miss fSntwisle, property 
of Wm. Bassett, Esq. ; Newton House, property of 
J. Samuel, Esq., occupied by J. Bevan, Esq. 

LLAN-BBYNNMAIR, Moktgomekt, a parish 
in die hun^ and union of Machynnllaeth, North 
Wales, on the river Dyfi : 228 miles from London 
(eoach road 191), 10 firom Machynnlhieth, 16 from 
Newtown.'^ttM^Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 16 
miles: i)nMn Derby, through Stafford and Shrews- 
bury, &c., 143 miles.-<>«(»^Money orders issued at 
MaohynnUaeth: London letters deliv^ 5) p.m.: 
poet closes 9 p.m. o »o Tliere are an Independent 
and a Calvinistio Methodist chapel here. One of 
the schools here is endowed with £12. 178. per 
annu m, and anothw with £36 a year from Dr. 
Willfams' estates. The manufiu$ture of woollens 
has been carried on to some extent for several years, 
hot the inhabitants are chiefly engaged in agricul- 
tural pursait8.^aM>-The living (St. Mary), a vica- 
rage in the archd'- and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued 
at £4. 8b. 1^: .pres. net income, £330: patron, 
Bishop of St. Asaph: pres. incumbent, T. Lewis, 
1838: contains 341 houses: pop"- in 1841, 2,019: 
probable pop*- in 1849, 2,322: ass^^ pn>i^- £5,649: 
poor rates in 1838, £1,191. 12s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLAN-GADOG. See AifLWcn. 

LLAN-CADWALADTR, Denbigh, a parish in 
the hun^ of Chirk, union of Llanfyllin, North 
Wales: 185 miles from London (coach road 179), 

8 from Oswestry, 8 iVom Llangollen. -o«> Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury, to Oswestiy, thence 8 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 100 miles. 
-eM>>Money orders issued at Oswestry: London 
letters deliv^ 10} a.m. : post closes 2 p.m.-e«»- 



The living, (St. Cadwaladyr), a perpetual curacy 
in the diocese of St. Asaph : pres. net income, £55 : 
patron. Bishop of St. Asapb : pres. incumbent, R. 
Williams: contains 37 bouses: pop"- in 1841, 234: 
ass^-propy- £746: poor rates in 1838, £78. lis. 

LLAN-CARFAN (East and West), Glamoroaw, 
a parish in thehun^* of Dinas-Powis, union of Car- 
diff, South Wales, about 3 miles north of the 
Bristol Channel. The parish comprises the extra 
parochial district of Llan-Oethin : 189 miles from 
London (coach road 172), 4 from Cowbridge, 12 
from Oardiff.-o»o-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Oowbridge 
Road station, thence 9 miles : from Derby, thnmgh 
Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 180 mile8.-o«c» 
Money orders issued at Cowbridge : London letters 
deliv*- 11 J a.m. : post closes 124 p.m.-o»ci-The 
church is a spacious edifice. An abbey was foun- 
ded here in the year 500, by St. Caradoc, the site of 
which is yet pointed out. This was the birth- 
place of the celebrated Welsh historian, Caradoc. 
The living (St. Cattrog), a discharged vicarage in 
the archd^' and di(x»se of Llandaff, is valued at 
£8. 138. 9d: pres. net income, £163: patron, Lord 
Chancellor: pres. incumbent, D. Morgan, 1837: 
contains 130 houses: pop°- in 1841, 699: ass^ 
propy- £5,053: poor rates in 1838, £491. Hs! 

LLANCILLOE, Hereford, a parish in the hun^ 
of Ewyas-Lacy, union of Dore, on the river Mon- 
now: 148 miles from London (coach road 150), 15 
from Hereford, 8 from Abergavenny.-o«o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stoneliouse and Gloucester, to Ross, 
thence 16 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &c., 139 miIes.-<9«>Money orders 
issued at Hereford : London letters deliv*^ 11 a.m. : 
post closes 1 p.m.-oM>.The living, a perpetual cu- 
racy in the archd'- of Hereford and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3: pros, net income £105: 
patron, Rev. J. Morris: pres. incumbent, John 
Morris, 1803: contains 1,050 acres: 15 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 84 : ass*- prop^^ £722 : poor rates in 
1838, £42. lis. 

LLAN-CIWG, (or Llan-Guick), Glamorgan, 
a parish in the hun*- of Llsngevelach, union of 
Neath, South Wales, intersected by the Swansea 
canaL The parish includes the hamlets of Allty- 
greeg, with Mawr and Blaenegall with Rasg^rwm : 
214 miles from London (coach road 206), 8 from 
Neath, 10 fVom Swansea. -o*o^ Gt.' West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester and Chepstow, to 
Neath, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Gloucester, &c., 205 miles.-oM» 
Money orders issued at Neath: London letters 
deliv*' 3 J p.m. : post closes 9 a.m.-o»c^The living 
(St. Ciwg), a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of 
Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, not in 
charge: pres. net income, £103: patron, H. F. E. 
Leach: pres. incumbent, Wm. Thomas, 1838: 
contains 335 houses: pop*^* in 1841, 2,813: pro- 
bable pop»- in 1849^ 3,235: ass*- piopj^- £3,014: 
poor rates in 1838, £592. Is. 

LLANDAFF, Glamoroak, a parish and city in 
the bun*- of Kibbor, union of Cardiff, South Wales, 
on the southern bank of the river Taff, which is 
here crossed by a bridge, and intersected by the 
Glamorganshire or Cardiff Canal : the parish, be- 
sides the city of Llandaff, comprises the hamlets 
of Canton, Ely, Fairwater, and Gabalva : 172 miles 




from London (coach road 165), 3 from Cardiff."o«c» 
Gt. West. Rail, through StonchousOf Gloucoster, 
and Chepstow, to Cardiff, thence 3 miles: from 
Derhy, through Binningham, Gloucester, &c., 163 
miles. "ove^Moncy orders issued at Cardiff: London 
letters deliv^ at 10 a.m. : post closes 2.40 p.m. 
This is one of the places, the gpreatness of which 
has passed away. Llandaff, though called a city 
by courtesy, because the site of a cathedral, and 
the town from which a bishop's see derives its 
title, is, in fact, nothing more than a straggling 
village, composed of mean dwellings, here and 
there intermingled with habitations of a more im- 
posing character. There was formerly a market 
here, but it has fallen into disuse ; and a mart for 
the sale of vegetables, gathered from the surround- 
ing district, and the supply of which is large and 
abundant, has been substituted in its stead. The 
principal object of attraction is, of course, the 
cathedral, and that is one of very considerable in- 
terest, for the see is said to have been founded as 
early as the year 180, and therefore long before 
the assumed domination of Augustine, and long 
prior to the diffusion of Romish errors, though it 
appears that Llandaff, for some time before the 
Norman Conquest, acknowledged its fealty to the 
pope.* A church which had stood here for some 
centuries, but which was destroyed at the Con- 
quest, was rebuilt in 1120, by Bishop Urban, who 
was a g^reat benefactor to the see. His structure 
fell in the course of ages into decay, but was tho- 
roughly renovated, and partly rebuilt, in 1751. 
The cathedral was formerly more extensive than 
at present, having been circumscribed by the re- 
pairs just alluded to, a new western front having 
been built across the nave, the old front being 
allowed to perish. The architecture of the an- 
cient building is partly Saxon, with an occasional 
intermingling of Norman ; but the prevailing style 
is that commonly called Gothic, the western front 
being very striking, and ornamented with some 
fine lancet windows of various sizes. Immediately 
over the principal entrance at this end, on a pro- 
jecting tablet, tiiere is the figure of a bishop, sup- 
posed to represent one of the earlier bishops of the 
see. Above that, and over the upper range of 
windows, and near the summit of the building, is 
another figure, in a sitting posture, holding a 
book. The whole is surmounted by an ancient 
cross. On the north side of the edifice there is a 
rich Saxon doorway, and on the south another 
doorway, but far less elaborate in its carving. At 
the western end there were formerly two noble 
towers, of which that at the northern angle alone 
remains ; two sides of this tower rest on the walls 
of the church, but the others are supported by two 
light arches, which rest on a single pillar. In the 
interior there are some elegant Gothic arches, 
which separated the nave from the side aisles. 
The length of the whole struoiure is 300 feet, and 
its breadth 80 feet. At the east end of the cathe- 
dral is the Lady Cliapel, where divine service is 
sometimes celebrated in VVelsh ; and on the south 
side stands the Chapter-house, a square room, the 
roof of which is supported by a single pillar, from 
which arches diverge to the several sides of the 
apartment. The new west front, through a singu- 
lar incongruity, is of the Grecian order of archi- 



tecture, and even the altar, until lately, was en- 
closed under a Grecian portico. In the cathedral 
are several ancient and striking monuments, some 
of them in a dilapidated condition, but none are of 
any great public interest. Close by are the re- 
mains of the ancient castellated residence of the 
bishops, consisting of a large gateway, and part 
of the external wall ; the destruction 6[ this build- 
ing, and of the principal portion of the church, is 
attributed to Owen Glendower. The county ma- 
gistrates hold petty sessions here for the hundred 
of Kibbor.-o«o*The living (St Peter): pop"- in 
1841, 1,276: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,467 : poor 
rates in 1838, £516. 5s.^o-e^Fairs : Feb. 9, and 
Whit-Monday, for cattle. o>° A t Llandaff is the 
seat of George Mathew, Esq., to whose ancestors 
there are many memorials in the cathedral. This 
gentleman, who is the representative of one of the 
very oldest families in the kingdom, belongs to a 
race which for agpes has been of historic interest. 
The founder was Aeddan, Lord of Grosmout Castle, 
in Monmouthshire, whom Llwyd, in his ** Royal 
Tribes,*' states to have been the fifth son of Gwne- 
thooed, the Great Prince of Cardigan and Gwent. 
From him was descended Sir Maidoc-ap-Caradoc, 
who was an eminent leader of the Crusaders, and 
made a knight of the celebrated order of St. Sepul- 
chre. Sir Jevan-ap-Gryffith, ninth Lord of Gros- 
mont, married Cecily, a descendant of William 
the Conqueror. Sir David Mathew, eldest son of 
Sir Mathew-ap-Jevan, whose tomb in the cathe- 
dral is one of the best spccimbns of the kind of his 
age, was made gprand standard-bearer of England 
by Edward IV., whose life he is said to have saved 
at the battle of Towton. Sir John Mathew of 
Tresungher and Pennytenny, who with his rela- 
tives, Sir Richard and Sir Bevil Grenville, took an 
active part in the civil wars of the 17th century, 
rebuilt his ancestral mansion at Tresungher, which 
had been entirely destroyed during the contest. 
On his death, the representation of the family de- 
volved upon his nephew. Colonel Abednego Mathew, 
who was made governor of St. Christopher's ; in 
which island, and in Antig^ia, he received large 
-grants of land, as a recompense for the losses 
which his family had sustained in the royal ser- 
vice. At his death, the property descended to 
William Mathew, Esq., who, entering at an early 
age the Coldstream Regiment, raised by his rela- 
tive General Monk, afterwards Duke of Albemarle, 
became highly distinguished during the subsequent 
war, and was promoted to the command of the 
regiment at Namur, was afterwards made a knight 
of the Bath, and captain-general and lord high- 
admiral of the Leeward Islands. His descendants 
all held distinguished positions in the country. 
The present Mr. Mathew has also been a member 
of the Coldstream Guards, served with distinction 
as aide-de-camp to his uncle, G^eral Mathew, in 
America, and was subsequently engaged on a spe- 
cial mission to Napoleon Buonaparte, at the peace 
of Amiens. 

LLANDANWG, Mkrionbth, a parish in the 
hun^' of Ardudwy, union of Festiniog, North Wales : 
237 miles from London (coach road 229), 3 from 
Harlech, 7 from Bannouth.-«Me-Nor. West. Rail, 
tlirough Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury, to Os- 
westry, thence 60 miles: from Derby, through 




St&flford and Shrewsbury, Ac., 182 mile8.-«r^Mo- 
M]r orders issaed at Carnarvon and Gorwen : London 
lettera deliy*- 5} p.m. : post doses 7 p.m.-o«o-The 
ptiiih lies in a sequestered situation at the month 
of the river Astit>.-o«c>.The living (St. Tanwg), a 
rectory with the curacy of Uanhedr, in the archd^* 
of Merioneth, and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£7. 15s. l^d.: pres. net income, £194: patron, 
Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, J. J. Brown, 
1846; contains 127 houses: pop"- in 1841, 746: 
us^ prop^- £1,251 : poor rates in 1838, £191. 

LLAN-DAUDDWK, (or Llandowbos), Cab- 
MASTHEK, a paririi in the hun^* of Derllys, union of 
Carmarthen, South Wales, on the southern bank of 
tbe river Taff : 242 miles from London (coach road 
242), 4 from St. Cleat's, 4 from Carmarthen.-o«e> 
GL West. Bail, throttgh Stonehoose, Gloucester, 
tad Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 28 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 
233 miles. o« e Money oiders issued at St. Clear's : 
London letters deliv^ 7 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-o«»-There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. 
-a«»-The living (St. Cringat), a discharged rectory 
in the archd^ of Carmarthen and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £6: pres. net income, £132: 
patron, Lord Milford : pres. incumbent, T. Martin, 
1812: contains 68 houses: pop^ in 1841, $92: 
ut^ prop^- £818: poor rates in 1838, £126. 3s. 

LLANDAVENNY, Mohxouth, a hamlet in the 
parish of St. Bride's, Netherwent — (which see for 
access, &c.) : 145 miles from London, 7 from New- 
port, 9 firom Chepstow.-oMa-Mono^ orders issued at 
Newport: London letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post 
doaes 2} p.m.-oM9-Contains 300 acres : 9 houses : 
pop-- in 1841, 375: ass*- prop^- £409. 

LLANDAVOG, Caruabtheit, a parish in the 
ban^ ci Is-Cenen, union of Garmarthen, South 
Wales, on the river Gwendraeth-Fa'wr : 232 miles 
from London (coach road 221), 7 from Carmarthen, 
9 from Kidwelly.-e«:^ Gt. West. Bail, through 
Stonehoose, Gloucester, and Chepstow to Swansea, 
iheaee 16 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &c., 223 milos.-«Me-Money orders 
iasned at Carmarthen : London letters deliv** 4} 
fJD,: post closes 9 p.m.-<9»a-There are two Calvin- 
istic Methodist churches here.*o«e-The living, a 
perpetual curacy in the archd''' of Carmarthen and 
diooese of St David's, is valued at £8 : pres. net 
i]ieome,%81: patron, Bishop of St David's: pres. 
iocnmbent, E. Morris, 1819 : contains 189 houses : 
pop^ in 1841, 1,047: ass*- prop^- £3,029: poor 
rates in 1838, £344. 9s. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANDDAUSAINT, (or Llakdotsaiht), Car- 
mabthbv, a parish in the bun*- of Perfedd, union of 
Llandovery, South Wales, at the source of the 
river Usk. The parish contains the hamlets of 
BInen-Sawthey, LJandoysaint, and Maes-fynnon : 
225 miles from London (coach road 189), 5 fhnn 
Llangaddog: 8 firom Llandovery .-«M>.Gt. West. 
Bui. through Stonehoose, Gloucester and Chepstow, 
to Neath, thence 19 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 216 miles. ■»•» 
Money orders issued at Llang^dog : London let- 
tera deiiv^ 1| p.m. : post doses 11 a.m.-e*o>A Cal- 
viniatic Methodist congregation was formed here 
in 1790.<<Mo-The living, a vicarage annexed to 
that of Llangaddog, in the archd^- of Carmarthen 



and diocese of St David's, not in charge : contains 
217 houses: pop"- in 1841, 942: ass*- prop^^* 
£2,367: poor rates in 1838, £297. 19s.^>«c^Fairs : 
October 20. 

LL AWN-DAWK, Cabm abtheh, a parish in the 
hun*- of Derllys, union of Carmarthen, South Wales : 
247 miles from London (coach road 242), 1^ from 
Llaughame, 14 from Tenby.-«Me-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow to 
Swansea, thence 33 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 238. -e«o- Money 
orders issued at St. Clear's : London letters deliv^ 
6 p.m. : post closes 10^ p.m.-eM.>Tbe living (St 
Marg^aret), a rectory with that of Pendine, in the 
archd^' of Carmarthen and diocese .of St. David's, 
is valued at £117. lOSs: patron, W. Powell, M.P. : 
pres. incumbent, D. Thomas, 1837: contains 5 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 26: ass*- prop^- £390: poor 
rates in 1838, £8. 9s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANDDEINIOL (or Carroo), Caboigak, a 
parish in the hun'* of liar, union of Aberystwith, 
South Wales, on the bay of Cardigan : 257 miles 
from London (coach road 218), 7 from Aberyst- 
with, 12 from Tregai"on. -o»e^ Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to New- 
town, thence 45 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 172 miles. o>a Money oiders 
issued at Aberystwith : London letters deliv'- 6 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-oM^-The living (St. Daniel), 
a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of Cardigan, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £6 : pres. net 
income, £66 : patron, R. Price, M.P., and Capt 
Yaughan: pres. incumbent, D. Jones, 1846: popl- 
in 1841, 273 : poor rates in 1838, £49. 1 8s. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. 

LLANDETTY (or Lahthbttt), Bbeook, a par- 
ish in the hun'- of Pen-Kelly, union of Brecon, 
South Wales, on the river Usk, and intersected by 
the Newport and Brecknock Canal : tlie parish in- 
cludes tbe hamlet of Dryffin, and the parcel of Yro : 
170 miles from London (coach road 161), 9 from 
Brecon, 8 from Crickhowell.-o«>-Grt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 28 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 161 miles.-o«=>- Money orders 
issued at Brecon: London letters deUv^ 11 a.m.: 
post closes 1 p.m.-e«>-The living (St Detta), a 
rectory, with the curacy of Taffechan, in the archdy- 
of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£7. 10s. 7}d. : pres. net income, £344: patron, P. 
G. Holford, Esq. : pres. incumbent, John Jones, 
1847: contains 104 houses: pop**- in 1841,420: 
ass'i- prop}"- £1,153: poor rates in 1838, £189. 10s. 

LLANDDEW (or Llakddewi), Brecon, a par- 
ish in the bun*- of Merthyr and Pen- Kelly, union 
of Brecon, South Wales, on the river Honddu : 173 
miles from London (coach road 167), 1 from Bre- 
con, 14 from Crickhowell.-o«c^Gt West Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 31 miles : firom Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 164 miles.-a«e-Monoy orders 
issued at Brecon : London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : 
post closes 3 p.m.-o«o>The church is a larg^ edifice, 
and of great antiquity. The bishop of St. David's 
had formerly a palace here, and he still holds a 
court loot for the manor, which belongs to his see. 
-o»c^The living, a perpetual curacy in the archd^- 
and diocese of St David's, is valued at £6 : pres. 



LLA 



16 



L.1^ 



net income, £89 : patron, Archdeacon of Brecon : 
pros, incumbent, Morgan Jones, 1845: ccatains 
66 houses: pop"- in 1841, 317: ass'^propi'' £1,538: 
poor rates in 1838, £112. Ts. 

LLAND£WI, GiiAVOBOAH, a paridi in the hnn'* 
and union of Swansea, Bouth Wales: 226 miles 
from London (coach road 215), 5 from Penrice, 
12 from 3wansea.-<>M»i- Gt West. RaiL through 
Stooehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 12 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 217 miles.-«Mo^Money orders 
issued at Penrice : London letters deliv^* 5^ pjn: 
post closes 9 p.m*-c»oo-The living (St David), a 
disch^- vicarage in the arch^^* of Carmarthen, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £3. 3s. 4d. : 
pres. net income, £71 : patron, Bishop of -St. 
David's : pres. incumb^t, fi. Phillips, 1821 : con- 
tains 26 bouses : pop"- in 1841, 164 : ass*** prop^* 
£864: poor rates in 1838, £25. 88. 

LLANDEWI-ABERARTH, Cakdioan, a parish 
in the hun^* ef liar, union of Aberaeron, at the mouth 
of the river Arth, on the coast of Cardigan bay e the 
parish includes the villages of Llandewi-Aberarth 
and Aberaeron : 264 miles from London (coach road 
224), 13 firom Lampeter, 16 &om Aberystwith. 
-oM»>Gt. West. Rail, through Sttmehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
255 miles. -o«>Money orders issued at Lampeter: 
London letters deliv^* 7^ a.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-ewcThe parochial charities produce about £7. a 
year. A. Calvinistic Methodist congregation was 
formed here in 1802.-^3«:^The living (St David), 
a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of Cardigan, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £6. : pros, net 
income, £100 : patron. Prebendary thereof: pres. 
incumbent, William Hughes, 1847: contains 190 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 1,066 : ass^- prop^- £1,440. 
Tithes commuted in 1839.-o«»-Fairs : July 5, and 
December 11. 

LLANDEWI-ABER-GWESIN, Beeook, a par- 
ish in the hun*^ And union of Builth, South Wales, 
at the confluence of the rivers Irven and Gwesin : 
230 miles from London (coach road 188), 15 from 
Builth, 15 from Rhayader.^>«o-Gt. West. RaU. 
through Ston^ouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Merthyr-Tidvil, thence 35 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 221 miles. 
-«>«e>^Money orders issued at Builth : London lot^ 
ters deliv^' 6 p.m. : poet closes 3} p.m. q*a The 
living (St. David) is a curacy annexed to the vi- 
.carage of Llan-gamroaroh: contains 21 houses: 
pop°- in 1841, l&: ass^* prop^* £293: poor rates 
w 1838, £22. 7s. 

LLANDDEWI-BREFI, CABi>iaAM, a parish in 
the hun^- of Penarth, union of Tregaron, South 
Wales, cm the river Teifi : it includes the town- 
ships of Dotbio-Camddwr, Dothi-Piscottror, Gath- 
.erly, Goggyan^ Gerwydd, Garth and Istradd, Gwn- 
fil, Llanis, Prisk and Parvan, and the chapelry 
of Blaen-Penal: 240 miles from London (coach 
road 218), 7 from Lampeter, 4 from Tregaron. 
*»w>Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehonse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Mertbyr Tydvil, thence 45 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 231 miles. "OMi^Money orders issued at 
Lampeter : London letters deliv*^ 6 p.m. : post 
closer 9 p.m.-«>«o-The church is a venerable build- 



ing, in the English style of architectuve, and in 
the churchyard there are some ancient and curious 
monuments. One of the schools here is endowed 
with £10 a year, and another with £5. There are 
several Calvinistic Methodist chapels here. The Ro- 
man station of Loventium is supposed to have stood 
here, several Latin remains and coins having been 
discovered in the place and neighbourhood A 
sjoiod, at wliich St. David was present, was held 
here in the year 519. Of this synod Lambard 
says : — When t&e great symide tixu held in Wale$ 
for the mipjpremm of ilifi heregye of IiihgU»$ {which^ 
after thopinion of nony, ira« n/thecoUeaie of Ban^or)^ 
Daund, then hythop of Mensven^ {now Sl Zhvidet 
of hU own MOpRd,) tftoqde upon a UtU hyUe and 
preached^ and duringe the sermon the hiU grew mwi- 
Ug under hU feete, {eayethe Of/raid^ for I mean 
neyther to he auctor nor fautor to auche poetrye,) 
and Ufted hkn up on highe. At tohich mirade the 
hole company standinge amased elected Mm tharehe- 
byshop; and DubritiuSf lohu^ was archebythop cf 
Caerleon before, eurrenikred that honour to David, 
Gyrald, that told this taU^ had not learned the leeeon, 
Mendaoem memorem esse oportet ; for in the same 
hie itinerarye^ wheare he reportethe this, he sayelthe 
ihat Dubritiue reeigned to Vavid for hie mfirmitie, 
being an olde decripite man, and that the hmumr was 
tranelated to Meneven by faoour of Kinge Ardhw, 
u>ho9e wide David imm, and thai woe no mirade at 
aU. I wis hie booke was not so longe that he neaded 
any mery tale to refreshe the reader. In. 1073, a 
great battle was fought here between the rival 
princes of Walee.'0«o>The living (St. David), ft 
perpetual curacy, with the curacy of Llanbaidam- 
Odyen, in the arehd^'- of Cardigan, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £6: pres. net income, 
£146 : patrons, Earl of lisbume and L. R. Price, 
Esq.: preB. incumbent, Edward Evans, 1848: 
contains 540 houses : pop^- in 1841, 2,591 : prob- 
able pop»- in 1849, 2,980: ass**- prop^- £2,175: 
poor rates in 1838, £520. 8s.<-o.c^Fair8 : Mi^?, 
July 24, October 9, Novembw 13. 

LLANDEWI-FACH, Radnoh, a parish in the 
faun*** of Pain's-Castle, union of Hay, South Wales : 
177 miles from London (coach road 162), 6 ijrom 
Hay, 14 firom Biecon.-oM*^t West. Rail, through 
Stonehonse and Gloucester to MonaoKWth, thenoe 
35 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 168 miles, a io Money Mors ich 
sued at Hay: London letters deliv'- 11^ a.m. : 
post closes at noon * o* » The living (St. Ditvid) u 
a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Llowes : eoii- 
tains 23 houses: pop°- in 1841, 130: ass^* propi^* 
£630 : poor Tates in 1838, £55. 

LLANDDEWI-FELFREY, Pkmbrokb, a parish 
in the hun*^- of Narbeth and Dungleddy, union of 
Narbeth, South Wales: the parish includes the 
hamlet of Henlan : 254 miles from London (coach 
road 251), 4 from Narbeth, 7 from Tenby.-<a«a-Gt. 
West. RalL through Stonehonse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 40 miles: from 
Derby, through Birpiingham, Gloucester, &c., 245 
mile8."<Me>-Money orders issued at Narbeth : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 9 p.m.: post closes 8^ p.iii. 
-©•e^The living (St. David) is valued at £8 : con- 
tains 134 houses : pop*** in 1841, 788 : ass**- piop'^- 
£3,088 : poor rates in 1837, £354. 

LLANDDEWIRCWM, Breoov, a parish in the 



LL\ 



17 



LLA 



faim^ and union of Bnilth, South Wales, on the 
imdl river Dnh&wn-wg: 225 miles from liOndon 
(coach road 171), 2 from Bnilth, 14 from Brecon. 
-o«=^t. West. Rail, thitragh Stonehonse, Qlouccg- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Merthyr-Tydvil, thence 30 
miles: from Derby, tfarongh Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c^ 216 milefl.-o«»-Money orders issued at 
Bnilth : London letters deliy'- 2^ p.m. : post closes 
7 p.m.-e*e>->The parochial charities produce about 
£5. per ammm.-o^^The living (St. David), a per- 
petual curacy, in the archd^- of Brecon, and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £6 : pres. net income, 
£81 : patrons, B. Price and V. Pocock, alternately : 
pres. incumbent, D.. Jones, 1846: contains 42 
houses: pop»- in 1841, 244: ass*- prop^- £1,459 : 
poor rates in 1838, £134. 178. 

LLANDDEWY-YSTRADENNY, Radhob, a 
parish in the hnn^ of KevcnTleece and Knighton, 
union of Knighton, South Wales, on the river 
Aran : the parish contains the townships of Church 
and Maestre-Rhos-Lowry : 171 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 172), 15 from Pen-y-bout, 11 fr^m 
Rbayadcr.^Mc^Gt. West. Rail, through Oxford to 
Worcester, thence 53 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham to Worcester, &c., 124 mileB.~e«o> 
Money orders issued at Rhayader: London letters 
deliv^ 4 p.m. : post closes 9 a.m.-o»oThere aro 
Ae remains of a castle here, which anciently be- 
longed to the Earls of Chester and the Mortimer 
fiuttily; and here, also, is a mound, supposed to be 
the site of a Welsh military station.^oM^The liv- 
ing (St. David), a perpetusd curacy, with that of 
Llanvihangel-Rhydithon, in the archd^* of Brecon, 
and diocese of St. David^s, is valued at £14: pres. 
net income, £112: patron. Chancellor of Brecon: 
pres. incumbent, R. Pughe, 1847: contains 113 
houses: pop*- in 1841, 693: ass*- propy- £2,671: 
poor rates in 1838, £289. Is. 

LLANDDOYSAINT. See Llakbdausaikt. 

LLAN-DDONA, Asqleakt, a parish in tho 
hun^ of Tyndeathwy, union of Bangor and Beau- 
maris, North Wales, on the coast of Redwharfe bay : 
245 miles frt>m London (coach rood 255), 4 from 
Beaumaris, 7 from Bangor.-e«o-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 7 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 145 miles. 
-o«>-Money orders issued at Beaumaris : London 
Utters dcliv*- 9 a.m,: post closes 4J p.m.-o#c.- 
There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. On 
a hill called * Arthur's Round Table,* there are the 
remains of a Danish fort. Tlie inhabitants are 
chiefly employed in the herring fishery.-o^o^The 
living (St. Dona), a perpetual curacy in tho archd^^- 
of Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£4. lOs. : pres. net income, £87: patron. Lord 
Boston: pres. incumbent, W. J. I-^wis, 1822: 



ass' 



*. 



contains 98 houses: pop"- in 1841, 506: 
propy- £778 : poor rates in 1838, £202. 5s. 

LLANDDUYWE, MERiOKErn, a parish in tho 
hun*- of Ardudwy, union of Dolgelly, North Wales : 
the parish includes the hamlets of Is-graig and 
TJwch-graig : 232 miles from London (coach road 
224), 4 from Barmouth, 6 from Harlech.-o«&-Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Oswestry, thence 55 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 147 milcs.-o»o- 
Money orders issued at Corwen: London letters 
deliV'- 3} p.m.: post closes 9 p.m.^o«o-Th6 living 



VOL. III. 



(St. Dwy wan) is a curacy, annexed to the rectory 
of Llannenddwyn : contains 74 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 386: ass^ prop^^- £1,277: poor rates in 
1838, £193. 14s. 

LLANDDWYN (or Llanddwtnwen), Anqle- 
SEY, a parish in tho bun'*- of Menai, North Wales : 
254 mUes from London (coach road 258), 20 from 
Beaumaris, 9 from Camarvon.-o«c^Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Bodorgan 
station, thence 3 miles : frtim Derby, through 
Crewe, Chester, &c., 154 milcs.-o«o-Money orders 
issued at Beaumaris : London letters deliv*** 1 p.m. : 
post closes 12J p.m. -o-c- In the time of Owen 
Glendwr, the shrine of this place was considered 
exceedingly wealthy, and its revenues, in the time 
of Henry VIII., constituted the richest prebend in 
Bangor cathedral. The oratory of St. Dwynwen 
stood near the sea-side : she was the daughter of 
Brychan-Urth, and a pious personage of great 
celebrity, who flourished in the fifth century. Here 
also was the Ffynnon, or St. Mary's Well, visited 
by contrite persons, who munificently contributed 
to the support of the monks by whom it was at- 
tended. Shell-fish, especially lobsters and crabs, 
are very abundant on the coast.-o«>-The living is 
a curacy, .annexed to tho vicarage of Llanidan: 
contains 47 houses : pop"- in 1841, 283 : ass^ prop^- 
£1,023. 

LLANDDYFNAN, Axglesey, a parish in tho 
bun*- of Tyndacthwy, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales, near the river Cefni : 249 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 258), 2 from Pentracth, 7 from 
Beaumaris.-<»«o-Nor. West. liail. through Crewe, 
Chester, and Bangor, to Gaerwen, thence 4 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, Chester, &c., 149 
miles. -e«»- Money orders issued at Bangor : London 
letters deliv*** 9 a,m.: post closes 3 p.m.^3*5»-Tho 
living (St. Dyvnan) is a rectory, with the curacies 
of Pentmith, Llanbdrgoch, and Llanfiiirmath-avar- 
neithaf, in the archd^- of Anglesey, and diocese of 
Bangor: pres. net income, £280: patron, Bishop 
of Bangor: pres. incumbent, W. Williams, 1844: 
contains 166 houses: pop"- in 1841, 718: oss**- 
propy- £1,386 : poor rates in 1838, £276. 18s. 

LLANDECWYN, Mebioneth, a parish in the 
bun*- of Ardudwy, union of Festiniog, North 
Wales, on the southern bank of the river Traeth- 
Bach: 222 miles from London (coach road 217) , 19 
fipom Carnarvon. -o«e^Nor. West. Rail, through Wol- 
verhampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 
45 miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 137 mile8.-o»e- Money orders issued at 
Carnarvon: London letters deliv^ 7 p.m.: post 
closes 9 p.ra.-o*»-The living (St. Tcewyn), a per- 
petual curacy, annexed to that of Llanfehongel-y- 
Traethan: contains 83 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
516: ass*- prop^- £1,101: poor rates in 1838, 
£159. 9s. 

LLANDEFAILOG-FACH, Brecott, a parish in 
the bun*- of Merthyr, union of Brecon, South 
Wales, on the river Honddu : the parish includes 
the chapelry of Llanfihangel-Fcchan : 180 miles 
from London (coach road 171), 4 from Brecon, 11 
from Builth.-»»c-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 38 
miles: from Derby, tlirougli Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 171 miles.-o«c^ Money orders issued at 
Brecon : London letters dcliv^ 9^ a.m. : post 



closes 2J p.m.-«*»-The living (St. Tyvaelog), a 
rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Uanfihangel- 
Fechan, in the archd^* of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £13: pres. net income, 
£258 : patron, Lord Chancellor : pres. incumbent, 
T. Vaughan, 1830: contains 68 houses: pop°* in 
1841, 382 : ass"*- prop^- £791 : poor rates in 1838, 
£55. 16b. 

LLANDEFAELOG-FAWR (or Llahdevalley) 
North and South, Bk£cx>n, a parish in the hun^- of 
Talgath, union of Brecon, South Wales, south-west 
of the Wye: 166 miles from London, 7 from Bre- 
con, 10 fh>m Hay.-o«o-(For access and postal ar- 
rangements, see above. )-o«:»-The living (St. Tei- 
law) is a vicarage, annexed to that of Crickadam : 
contains 152 houses: pop"* in 1841, £705: ass^ 
props'- £3762: poor rates in 1838, £348. 17s. 

LLANDEFAELOG-TREYR-GRAIG, Brecon, 
a parish in the hun^ of Pen-Kelly, union of Brecon, 
South Wales, on a branch of the Wye: 167 miles 
from London, 4 from Brecon, 16 from Builth.<«>M». 
(For access and postal arrangements, see above.) 
-o«=>-The living (St. Tyvaelog) is a curacy, an- 
nexed to the rectory of Llanvillo; contains 4 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 35: poor rates in 1838, 
£33. 128. 

LLAKDEGAI, Carkabvon, a parish in the 
hun^ of Uchaf, union of Bangor and Beaumaris, 
North Wales, on the banks of the river Ogwen : 
the parish includes the chapelry of Capel-Curig : 
239 miles from London (coach road 250), 1 from 
Bangor, 10 from Carnarvon .-o»e^Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 1 
mile : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 139 miles. 
-««o-Money orders issued at Bangor : London let- 
ters deliv**- 7} a.m. : post closes 6 p.m.-e«»-The 
place is called after the name of Tegai, a son of 
Ithel Hael, and a saint, who lived about the close 
of the fifth century, who came over with Cadran 
from Armorica to renovate the spirit of Christian- 
ity in Britain. The church, a very ancient struc- 
ture, stands on an eminence just above the banks 
of the jiver Ogwen. Besides other curious me- 
morials, it contaijis the monument of Archbishop 
Williams, a man eminently celebrated in the time 
of Charles I., and who passed through vicissitudes 
such as it has been the lot of but few men to en- 
counter. He was elevated to the see of Lincoln, 
became lord-keeper of the privy seal, and was sub- 
sequently made archbishop of York. While lord- 
keeper he was accused of subornation, and tried 
by his peers, was found guilty, and suffered im- 
prisonment from 1637 to 1640. After his release 
he was raised to the metropolitancy of York, and 
then shortly afterwards banished from the king- 
dom. He died at the house of Sir Roger Mostyn 
of Gloddaeth in 1650, in the 68 th year of his age. 
Dr. Davies wrote some lines upon this monument, 
which appeared in Dodsley's CoUection, in which, 
after an exclamation of surprise, that neither of 
his two cathedrals could give him burial-room, he 
pleasingly concludes — 

" Enviad ambitton, what are all thy aehemM, 
But waking mlBeiy or pleasing dreams I 
Sliding and tottering on the heights of state, 
The salijeot of this rase declares thv fate. 
Great as he was, 70a see bow small the gain, 
A burial so obscure, a muSw so mean." 

In the latter part of his life he retired to North 



Wales, devoted his Ufe to meditation and prayer, 
and met his death with the peace and fortitude of 
a Christian. There is a Weslcyan chapel here. 
The parish is exceedingly mountainous, and con- 
tains a vast quantity of roofing slate, the quarries 
of which are very extensive, and occasion employ- 
ment to as many as 1,500 men, being the chief 
support of the population; they have been wrought 
for upwards of fifty years.-««»-The living (St. Te- 
gai) is a perpetual curacy in the archd'^* and dio- 
cese of Bangor, not in. isharge : pres. net income, 
£114: patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
William Morgan, 1846 : contains 446 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 3,010: probable pop"- in 1849, 
3,461: ass''- prop]"- £2,978: poor rates in 1838, 
£837. 9s. -o«»- Penrhyn CasUe, one of the most 
superb private residences in the kingdom, was 
erected by, and is now the residence of, the Hon. 
Edward Gordon Douglas Pennant. It is built in 
the Saxon style, of Anglesey marble. The pro- 
prietor, who has represented the county of Car- 
narvon in the House of Commons for several 
years, is a brother of the Earl of Morton, and mar- 
ried Juliana-Isabella-Mary, eldest daughter of the 
late George Dawkins, Esq., who traced his direct 
descent from Thomas Peimant, son of David ap 
Tudur Pennant, who was living in the time of 
Henry VL, and whose descendant, Richard Pen- 
nant, Esq., was created Baron Penrhyn of the 
peerage of Ireland. His lordship died without 
issue, and the title became extinct, but the estates 
passed to his cousin, George Hay Dawkins, Esq., 
father of the lady of the present proprietor, who 
then assumed the name of Pennant. 

LLANDEGFAN, Akgleset, a parish in the 
hun'^* of Tyndaethwy, union of Bangor and Beau- 
maris, North Wales: 242 miles from London 
(coach road 254) , 3 from Beaumaris, 4 from Ban- 
gor. -««=- Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester to Bangor, thence 4 miles: from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 142 miles.-««c^ Money orders 
issued at Beaimiaris: London letters deliv**- 9 
a.m. : post closes 4^ p.m.-caM^-One of the schools 
here was endowed by the late Lady Bulkcley, 
with £15 per annum. There is a Calvinistic 
Methodist chapel here.-o«s>-The living (St. Dyv- 
nan), a disch'- rectory with the curacy of Beiau- 
maris, in the archd^- of Anglesey, and diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £19. lis. 8d. : pres. net in- 
come, £366: patron. Sir R. B. W. Bulkeley, Bart.: 
pres. incumbent, Hugh Jones, 1843 : contains 151 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 812: ass*- prop^- £1,215 : 
poor rates in 1838, £286. lis. 

LLANDEGLA, Denbigh, a parish in the hun'- 
of Yale, union of Ruthin, North Wales, at the 
source of the river Aleh : 195 miles from London 
(coach road 192), 7 from Ruthin, 8 from Llan- 
gollen.-o«e-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhamp- 
ton and Shrewsbury to Llangollen, thence 8 miles: 
from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 
110 miles. -e«o. Money orders issued at Ruthin: 
London letters deliv*^ 11 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m. 
-o«o-The living (St. Tecla), a disch*- rectory in 
the arohd''- and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at 
£8. 12s. 3id. : pres. net income, £95 : patron. 
Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, E. Wil- 
liams, 1813 : contains 81 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
417 : poor rates in 1837, £123. 188.^>«:^Fair8 : 



ll 



LLA 19 

« 

March 11, April 25, Jane 23, Aagast 4, and Oc- 
tober 26. 

LLANDEGLET, Radhob, a parish in the hxm^- 
of Cefallys, nnion of Kington, 8onth Wales, on 
the river Ithon : the parish inclndes the iSwydd 
with Grsig and Trelan : 168 miles from London 
(ooach road 169), 12 from Rhayader, 7 from New 
Radnor.-o«>^t. West Rail, through Oxford to 
Worcester, thence 50 miles: from Derby, through 
Bbmmgham, Worcester, &c, 121 nules-^cMo^Money 
orders issued at Rhayader: London letters deliv^* 
3 p.in. : post closes 9^ p.m.^<Mo.The free school 
here is endowed with £17 a year. The other cha- 
rities produce about £11 per annum.^«Mo-The Ut- 
iog (8t. Teda), a disch'- vicarage in the archd^* 
and diocese of S^ David's, is valued at £3. 5s. 5d. : 
pies, net income, £120: patron. Bishop of St. 
Oavid^s: pres. incumbent, John Jones, 1800: 
pop** in 1841, 424 : poor rates in 1838, £214. 

198. 

LLANDEGRETH, Moshouth, a parish in the 
him'- of Usk, onion of Pont-y-pool, on a branch of 
the Usk: '162 miles from London (coach road 
U7), 4 from Gaerleon, 5 from Pont-y-pooL-«>M»-Gt. 
West Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Newport, thenoe 6 miles: from Derby, through 
Biimingham, Gloucester, &c., 183 miles, oca 
Money orders issued at Newport : London letters 
deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 2^ p.m.-<Mo>The pa^ 
rochial charities produce about £2» 6s. 8d. per 
aDBQm.«oM»i>The Hviug, a disch'* rectory in the 
archdf* and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £4. 
4b. 9id. : pres. net income, £164 : patron, W. A. 
Williams : oontains 720 acres : 20 houses : pop*** 
ia 1841, 131 : ass"*- prop^"- £747 : poor rates in 
1838, £80. lOs. 

LLANDEGWNING, OAKiriRvoir, a parish in 
the hnn^ o€ Commitmaen, union of Pwllheli, North 
Wales : 273 miles from London (coach road 249) , 
6 from Pwllheli, 10 fjrom Nevin.-cMo-Nor. West. 
BsiL through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 35 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, 
&e., 173 miles. o«& Money orders isBue4 at Pwll- 
heli: London letters deliv*^ noon: post closes 1 
pjn.-<>K»-The charities produce about £2. 15b. per 
annum. o » n The living is a rectory annexed to 
that of Lilaniestyn : contains 22 houses : pop*** in 
1841, 143: ass^ piop^- £1,158: poor rates in 
1838, £86. 5s. 

LLANDEILO, Pembkokb, a parish in the hun^* 
of Kemess, union of Narbetb, South Wales, at the 
source of the river Cleddau : 269 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 263), 8 from Narbeth, 12 from 
GaTdigaii.-ew>-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
^ouceater, and Chepstow to Swansea, thence 55 
milea: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c, 260 miles.-«>M»-Money orders issued at 
NariMth: London letters deliv^ 9i a.m.: post 
closes 7) p.m.*«Mo.The living (St. Teilo) is a per- 
petual curacy annexed to Ihat of Llangolman: 
oottUms 23 houses: pop"- in 1841, 205: ass^* 
propr* £156: poor rates in 1838, £18. 2s. Tithes 
commuted m 1839. 

LLANDEILO-ABER-CYWYN (or Llakdilo 
ABEsoowrx), Carmarthen, a parish in the hun*^ of 
Derllys, union of Carmarthen, South Wales, on the 
northern bank of the river TafF: 239 miles from 
London (coach road 242), 4 from St. Clear's, 8 



LLA 



from Carmarthen. -«>M»- Gt West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester and Chepstow to Swansea, 
thence 25 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 230 miles. o«p Money orders 
issued at St. Clear's : London letters deliv^- 7 p.m. : 
post closes 9 p.m.-oM»The living (St. Teilo) is a 
perpetual curacy in the archd^* of Carmarthen, 
and diocese of St. David's : pres. net income, £54: 
patron, J. G. Hughes, Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. 
Thomas, 1839: contains 15 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 
78 : ass<^ prop'- £737 : poor rates in 1838, £26, 
19s. 

LLANDEILO-ARFAN (or Llakdilob-Fahe,), 
Breooh, a parish in the bun*'* of Merthyr, union of 
Brecon, South Wales, on a branch of the Usk : 177 
miles fh)m London (coach road 182), 11 from Bre- 
con, 8 from Llandovery .-*9M»<}t. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
45 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 168 miles.-«Me-Money orders is- 
sued at Brecon: London letters deliv^* 11 J a.m. : 
post closes 12} p.m. a «e . The living (St. Teilo), a 
perpetual curacy in the archd'* of Brecon, and Jo- 
cose of St David^s, is valued at £5 : pres. net in- 
come, £83 : patron, Co-heirs of W. Jeffireys, Esq. : 
pres. incumbent, T. Price, 1817: contains 104 
houses: pop'* in 1841, 525: ass^ prop^* £1,871 : 
poor rates in 1838, £196. 148. TiUies commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANDEILO-FAWR (or Llakdilo -Vawr), 
Casmartreh, a parish in the hun^ of Cayo, Per- 
fedd, and Is-Kcnnen, union of Llandilo-Fawr, 
South Wales, on the river Towy : the parish in- 
cludes the hamlets of Bryn-y-Beirdd, Trecastle, 
Tregib, Clynammon, Cwmcawlwyd, Manerfabon, 
Manordilo Lower and Upper, Pentre Cwm, Tach- 
loyan and Rhiewlas, Tyrrcscob and Rhos-maen, 
the chapelry of Taliaris, and the village and 
liberty of Llandilo-Fawr : 254 miles from London 
(coach road 202), 16 from Carmarthen.-o«>-(jt. 
Wesf. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 40 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 245 
miles. -««>-Money orders issued at Llandeilo: Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 12 j^ pm. : post closes 11. 10 a.m. 
B ip The streets are irregularly and for the most 
part meanly built, but there are in the town 
several excellent and even handsome residences, 
but nothing can exceed the beauty of the situation 
in which Llandeilo stands. It occupies an ele- 
vated spot on the western bank of the river Towy, 
commanding delightful prospants of the vale in 
both directions, with a fine view to the eastward 
of the hilly region which divides this county from 
Glamorganshire. The river is crossed here by a 
substantial stone bridge of modern erection. The 
town is named after the saint to whom the church 
is dedicated, and who, it appears, was a person so 
eminent for his sanctity, that after his death three 
places contended for the care of his body : Pen- 
nalum where his ancestors were buried, Llandeilo 
where he died, and Llandaff where he was bom. 
The contention between the pious inhalntants of 
these several places being rather sharp, the saint, 
in order to put a stop to the strife, as the story 
goes, appeared in three different bodies so truly 
alike, that no person could distinguish one f^m 
the other, and so each place took one. Bishop 



Godwin adds for the honour of hU own church, 
*^ that by fi^uent mlraolee at his tomb, it appeared 
that the inhabitants of Llandaff possessed the true 
body." The church is an ancient stroctuxe. Lord 
Dynevor has lately erected a chapel of ease at his 
own expense. The Wesleyan and Calvinistio 
Methodists, the Independents and the Baptists, 
have places of worship here. One of the schools 
here has a small endowment. There are some 
woollen manu£Actories, com^mills and tanning 
establishments in the town, and seyeral calcareous 
and chalybeate springs in the parish, one of which 
called Ffynnan Craig CeSyl, possesses valuable 
medicinal properties. Llandilo Yawr is oue of 
the polling-places for the county members. The 
Llandeilo poor-law union comprises twelve pa- 
rishes, with a population of about 17,000 persons. 
Within a short distance of Llandeilo are the re- 
mains of Dynevor castle, now a picturesque ruin, 
mantled with ivy, and forming, with the strik- 
ing scenery hy which it is surrounded, one of 
the most beautiful places in the Principality; it 
is celebrated as having been the residence of the 
Prince of South Wales. It was originally built 
by Boderic the Great, who bequeathed it to his son 
Cadell, by whose successors the seat of govern- 
ment was removed to Cannarthen until the pro- 
gress of the English arms, and the settlement 
of the Anglo Nomuui invaders along the coast 
obliged them to return to Dynevor, which was one 
of the last places held by the descendants of Ro- 
deric, and near whioh the final contest for the 
independence of Wales took place, when Llewellyn 
was signally defeated by Edward I. in 1282. At 
some distance from the castle, and within the cir- 
cuit of the park, stands Newton House, the seat of 
Lord Dynevor. The mansion is of modem date. 
The park comprises a considerable extent of 
ground, and exhibits perhaps a richer display of 
varied landscape than any spot of similar size in 
■the kingdom. The surface of the upper park is 
diversified by gentle undulations, and has been 
planted with great Judgment and taste, while the 
abrupt hill which rises from the meadows on the 
banks of the Towy, is clothed with noble masses of 
the finest forest trees, whose majestic forms and 
gnarled branches beautifully harmoniso with the 
olden towers which they envelop. The grounds 
are seen to the best advantage f]x>m the opposite 
side of the river, but indeed there is no aspect 
under which they can be viewed in which they do 
not appear most strikingly beautifu]. Dyer, in 
his poem entitled Grongar Hill, has thus partly 
described them : — 

** OAudf SB the opening dawn, 
Lien a long and level lawn. 
On which a dark hill, steep and high, 
Holds and charms the wandering eje I 
Deep are his feet in Towv's flood, 
His sldos are clothed with waving wood, 
And ancient towers crown his brow, 
That cast an awftil look below, 
Whose ru^erj^cd walla the ivr eraepa, 
And with her arms from falling keepSt 
'Tis now the raven's bleak abode, 
'Tls now th' apartment of the toad; 
And there tlit) fox sccurelf feeds, 
And there the poisonous adder breeds, 
Concealed in ruins, moss, and weeds ; 
While ever and anon there fall 
Huge heaps of hoary mouldered wall. 
Yet time ha^ seen, that lifts the low, 
And level Ujs the lofty brow — 



lias seen this broken pile complete, 
Big with the vanity or state.— 
But transient is the smile or fate.** 

Lord Dynevor traces his descent, in a direct line, 
from Uryan, Prince, or, as he was sometimes called. 
King of Reged, Lord of Kidwelly, CarmuUo, and 
Yakenen, in South Wales, who nuuricd Margaret 
La Faye, daughter of Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall, 
and was ancestor of Sir Elidir Ddu, a knight of 
the Sepulchre, in the time of Richard I. Sir Eli- 
dir was great-grandfather of GrifBth-ap-Nicholas, 
who had two sons, one of whom founded the fami- 
lies of Bowen of Llechdwynny, and of Roes, now 
seated at Killymaenliwyd. From the elder son 
and heir, Thomas, father of the famed Sir Rhys- 
ap-Tbomas, descended, through a long line of dis- 
tinguished progenitors, Griffith Rice, Esq. of New- 
ton, M.P. for the county of Carmarthen, in the 
times of William III. and Queen Anne, whose son, 
George Rice, Esq., married Lady Cecil, only daugh- 
ter of William, second baron and first Earl Talbot, 
who, having no surviving male issue, was in 1780 
created Baron Dynevor of Dynevor, with renuiin- 
der to his daughter. Her ladyship succeeded to 
the title in 1783, and assumed, in accordance with 
the will of her mother, the name and arms of Car- 
donnell only ; but on her decease, her eldest son, 
the present peer, resumed his ancestral name of 
Rice. His loi'dship, who succeeded as third baron 
in 1793, is lord-lieutenant and custos rotulorom of 
his county, and is also colonel of the Carmarthen- 
shire Militia.--o«c^The living (St Teilo), a vicar- 
age in the archd'- of Carmartiien, is valued at £1G : 
pros, net income, £512: patron. Bishop of St. Da- 
vid's: pres. incumbent, J. W. Pugh, 1838: con- 
tains 1,024 houses: pop"* in 1841, 5,471: prob- 
able pop»inl849, 6,291: a8s*»- prop^- £13,046: 
poor rates in 1838, £1,929. 4s. 

LLAMDEILO-FAWR, Cabuabthbh, a village 
and liberty in the above parish, o^o (For access 
and postal arrangements, see above.) osa Contains 
246 houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,458. 

LLANDEILO-GRABAN, Radhob, a parish in 
the hun*^ of Pain's-Castle, union of Hay, South 
Wales, on the eastern bank of the Wye : 172 miles 
from London (coach road 164), 6 from Builth, 12 
from Brecon.^o«o-Gt. West Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Ross, thence 40 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester 
to Ross, &c., 163 mile8.-e«>^Money orders issued 
at Builth: London letters deliv^. 3^ p.m.: post 
closes 6 p.m.^aM:^The living (St Teilo) is a per- 
petual curacy in the archd'- of Brecon, and diocese 
of St. David's: pres. net income, £72: patron. 
Prebendary thereof: contains 55 houses : pop^' in 
1841, 283: ass*- prop^- £1,111: poor rates in 
1837, £203. 18s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANDEILO-TAL-Y-BONT, GLAiionoAW, a 
parish in the bun** and union of Swansea, on the 
eastern bank of the Llwchwr: the parish includes 
the hamlet of Tyr-yr-Brenkin and Bviskodwin: 
224 miles from London (coach road 216), 10 from 
Swansea, 7 from Llanelly.-o«o- Gt West Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 10 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham.Gloucester, &c., 2 1 5 mi1es.^eMc:-Monev 
orders issued at Swansea: Ijondon letters deliv^ 
4} p.m. : ,post closes 9 p.m.-««o-The Independents 



LLA 



21 



LLA 



and Calvinistic Methodtsto have places of worship 
here. The parish la veiy extensive, and contains 
nauk coaL-3*»-The living (St. Teilo), a disch*- 
vicazage in the arehd7- of Carmarthen, and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £4. 148. 7d. : pres. not 
inoome, £140 : patxon, Howel Gwyn, Esq. : pres. 
incnmbBBt, Tiiomas Clarke, 1845: contains 260 
houses : pop^ in 1841, 1,410 : probable pop*^ in 
184d, 1,621 : ass^ prop]"* £a,923 : poor rates in 
1838, £522. 14B.-o.c^Fair, first Monday after Old 
Christmas-day. 

LLANDEINIOLEN, Carnarvoit, a parish in 
the hon^' of Isgwyrfai, union of Camarvon, North 
Wales, east of the Staaits of Menai: 224 miles 
firom London (coach road 248), 4 i¥om Camarvon, 
6 fkmn Bangor.xMc-Gt. West Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Bangor, thence 6 miles : from Der^ 
by, through Crewe, &c., 144 miles»"eM>-Money or- 
ders issued at Camarvon: London letters deliv^ 
3} p.m. : post doses 10 a.m.-<Me.The Independents 
and Calvinistic Methodists have places of worship 
here. There are some extensive slate, quarries 
and some mineral springs in lihe parish. Near 
Pennllynn there are the remains of a pidace of 
the Welsh princes. Pen Dinas was a Roman en- 
campment; it is 600 feet high, and was enclosed 
with a double ditch and nunpart.^Mc-The living 
(St. Deiniolen), a disch*^ rectory in the archd''* 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £13. 88. 9d. : 
pres. net income, £305: patron. Lord Chancellor: 
pres. incumbent, T. N. Williams, 1841 : contains 
510 houses: pop*^* in 1841,4,202: probable pop"* 
hi 1849, 4,832 : ass^- props'* £3,190 : poor rates in 
1838, £599. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANDENNY, Monmouth, a parish in the 
hun^ of Ragland, union of Monmouth : 153 miles 
from London (coach road 138), 4 from Usk, 9 
from Monmouth. -eM»- Gt. West. Rail, through 
Btonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
9 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 144 miles.-e«»-Money orders issued 
at Usk : London letters deliv*^ 9 a.m. : post dosos 
3} p.m.-«*e>The parochial charities produce about 
£46 a year.-o«e^The living (St. John), a disoh'* 
vicarage in the archd^* and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £5. 158. 5d.: pres. net income, £50: 
patron, Duke of Beaufort: pres. incumbent, W. 
Powell, 1818: contains 2,470 acres: 76 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 375 : ass^- props'- £2,281 : poor rates 
in 1838, £131. 6s. 

LLANDERFEL, Meriombtr, a parish in the 
hun^ of Pen-Llyn, union of Bala, North Wales, 
on the northern bank of the Dee : 200 miles from 
London (coach road 201), 6 firom Bala, 7 from 
Corwen.-o«o-Nor. West, Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 23 
miles: from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, 
&G., 1 15miles.-oM»>Money orders issued at Corwen : 
London letters deliv'* 12j^p.m. : poet closes 11} 
tLm. o»o The parochial benefactions produce about 
£46 a year, part of which is paid to Raglan. q > p 
The living (St. Dervel Gadam), a rectory in the 
archd^* and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £13. 
128. lid.: pres. net income, £260: patron, Bishop 
of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, John Jones, 1840 : 
contains 2,470 acres: 76 houses: pop**- in 1841, 
953: poor rates in 1838, £131. 6s. 

LLANDERFEL, Mebioneth, a parish in the 



I 



hun^- of Pen-Llyn, union of Bala, North Wales, 
on the northern bank of the Dee : 197 miles from 
London, 8 from Corwen. -o«o- Nor. West. Bail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Os- 
westry, thence 20 miles: from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 112 miles. -=>»o- There 
are Independent and Calvinistic Methodist chapels 
here.-e*o-The living is valued at £13. 12s. lid.: 
poor rates in 1838, £408. 17s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839.*o«c>-Fairs, for horses, homed cattle, and 
sheep, August 17, and October 16. 

LLANDEVAUT, Monmouth, a chapelry in the 
parish of Llanmartin — (which sec for access, &c.): 
144 miles from London : 4 from Caerleon, 10 from 
Chep8tow.-o«>The chapel is in ruins, and the in- 
habitants attend the church of LIanmartin.-e«o. 
The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^* and 
diocese of Llandaff. 

LLANDIBIE. See Llandydie. 

LLANDILOR-FANE. See LLANDEn/>-AHPAN. 

LLANDINABO, Hereford, a parish in the 
hun^ of Wormelow, union of Ross, west of the 
Wye: 139 miles from London (coach road 128), 
7 from Ross, 8 fi-om Hereford.-o«>-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, thence 
7 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 130 miles.-ovo-Money orders issued at 
Ross : London letters dcliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 5} 
p.m.-o«»-The living, a disch**- rectory in the archd^* 
and diocese of Hereford, is valued at £2. 18s. 6}d. : 
pres. net income, £104 : patron, K. Hoskins, Esq. : 
pres. incumbent, J. Davies : contains 540 acres : 
9 houses: pop"- in 1841, 62: ass** prop''- £835: 
poor rates in 1838, £53. 12s. 

LLANDINAM, Moktgomert, « parish in the 
bun**' of Llanidloes, union of Newtown and Llanid* 
loes. North Wales, on the eastern bank of the 
Sexern: 219 miles iVom London (coach road 182), 
6 fh)m Llanidloes, 7 {torn Newtown.-o-o-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Newtown, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 129 milcs.-*>»o^Money 
orders issued at Llanidloes : London letters deliv^' 
4 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-3*o-The parochial cha- 
rities produce about £15. lOs. per anuum.-o«si-The 
living (St. Llonio), a vicarage in the diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £7. 3s. 1 Jd. : pres. net in- 
come, £270 : patron. Bishop of Bangor : pres. in- 
cumbent, David Jones, 1839 : contains 31 1 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 1,732: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,992: ass*- propy- £5,764: poor rates in 1838, 
£1,549. 14s. 

LLANDINGAD (orLLANDiuoAT), Carvabthen, 
a parish in the hun^ of Cayo and Pcrfcdd, union 
of Llandovery, South Wales, on the western bank 
of the Towy : the parish includes the borough of 
Llandovery, and the hamlets of Forest, Telych, and 
Ystrad: 231 miles from London (coach road 191), 
1 from Llandovery, 15 from Lampeter : Gt West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Neath, thence 25 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 222.^e*c>- 
Money orders issued at Llandovery : London let- 
ters deliv** at noon : post closes at noon.-o«e»-Tbe 
hving (St. Dingat) , a vicarage, with the perpetual 
curacies of Llanfairar-y-Bryn and YstradfBn, in 
the archd^' of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. Da- 
vid's, is valued at £7 : pre^. net income, £254 : 



patron, Bishop of St. David's: prcs. incumbent, 
Josh. Hnghes, 1846: contains 4G0 houses: popl- 
in 1841, £2,345: probable pop"- in 1849, £2,696: 
aas**- propy- £6,510: poor rates in 1837, £690. 

LLANDOCH (or Llahdouoh\ juxta BARRY, 
Glamoboah, a parish in the hnn^* of Dinas Powis, 
union of Cardiff, South Wales, north of the Bristol 
Channel: 173 miles from Ix>ndon (coach load 
164), 4 from Cardiff, 11 from Llantrissant.'««o- 
6t. West Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, 
and Chepstow, to Cardiff, thence 4 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 164 
miles.-o»c^The liying (St. Dochdwy), a rectory, 
annexed to that of Leckwith, is valued at £8. 8s. 
4d. : contains 22 houses : pop"* in 1841, 133 : ass^ 
prop3^- £533 : poor rates in 1838, £40. 14s. 

LLANDOCH (or Llandodgh), Glamoboan, a 
parish in the hun^* of Cowbridge, union of Bridg- 
end and Cowbridge, South Wales, on the river 
Cowbridge: 187 miles from London (coach road 
174), 2 from Cowbridge, 14 from Cardiff.-o*:-Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Cowbridge Road station, thence 7 
miles. "OM>. Money orders issued at Cowbridge: 
London letters deliv*^* 11 a.m.: post closes 1 p.m. 
•-o«<»-The charities produce about £1. 10s. a year. 
-o-c-The living (St. Dochdwy), a disch** rectory, 
with St. Mary's church, in the archd^- and diocese 
of Llandaff, is valued at £4. 18s. 9d.: pres. net 
income, £263 : patron, C. K. M. Talbot, Esq. : 
pres. incumbent, Rd. Evans, 1845: contains 24 
bouses: pop"* in 1841, 92: ass*- prop^- £771: 
poor rates in 1838, £45. 18s. 

LLANDOGET, Dekdioh, a parish in the hun'- 
of Is-Dulas, union of Llanrwst, North Wales, on 
the eastern bank of the Conwy : 234 miles from 
London (coach road 219), 2 from Llanrwst, 10 
from Conway. "(Mo^Nor. West. Rail, through Cre/ve 
and Chester to Conway, thence 10 miles: fit>m 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 134 miles.-««o^Money 
orders issued at Conway :. Loudon letters deliv*- 2 
a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-oM>.The living (St. Dog- 
van), a rectory in the diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £5. 138. l)d. : pres. net income, £187 : 
patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, T. 
Davies, 1825 : contains 56 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
222 : ass'- prop?"- £746 : poor rates in 1838, £142. 

58. 

LLANDOGO, Monmouth, a parish in the hun*^ 
of Ragland, union of Monmoutii, on the western 
bank of the Wye : 148 miles from London (coach 
road 136), 7 from Monmouth, 8 from Chepstow. 
q^o Gr. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Glou- 
cester to Chepstow, thence 8 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 139 miles. 
-oM»- Money orders issued at Monmouth : London 
letters deliv'- 9 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«>The 
living (St. Dochoe), a perpetual curacy, with that 
of Whitebrooke annexed, in the archd'- and diocese 
of Llandaff, is valued at 158. 9d. : pres. net income, 
£112: patron. Prebendary of Cairie: pres. incum- 
bent, Thos. Langlcy, 1834: contains 1,620 acres: 
146 houses : pop"* in 1841, 660 : ass**- prop''- 
£1,011: poor rates in 1838, £231. 7s. Tithes 
commuted in 1810. 

LLANDOUGH- JUXTA- BARRY. See Llaw- 

DOCH. 

LLANDOUGH. See Llakdoch. 



LLANDON. See Llakdwf. 

LLANDOVERY (or Llaktiitheyebte), Car- 
HARTHEN, a borough and market town in the parish 
of Llandingat, union of Llandovery, South Wales : 
234 miles from London (coach road 191), 15 from 
Lampeter. o»o Gt. West. RaiL through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Neath, thence 28 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 225 miles.-o«c>- Money orders issued 
here : London letters deliv*^ 1 1.25 a.m. : post closes 
12} p.m.-<Mo-The name of this place is believed to 
be a corruption of the Welsh term Uan-ym^Ddy- 
freed, which means " the church among the wa- 
ters," and appears to be derived from the position 
of the parish church Llandingad, which is situated 
on a flat promontory, between the united streams 
of the Bran and Gwydderid and the river Tywi, a 
little above their confluence ; over the last of these 
there are two bridges, one of which is built of 
stone, and the other is a suspension bridge. The 
town consists of several streets, and the houses 
are, for the most part, highly respectable in ap- 
pearance; the High Street, especially, being a 
broad and handsome avenue, many improvements 
having been made during the last few years. The 
church of Llandingad stands in the town ; that oC 
Llan&rarybrynn occupies an eminence at a short 
distance, but within the limits of the borough. The 
origin of the town is ascribed by some authorities 
to the neighbouring Roman station of Llan-fair-y- 
Bry nn, but others believe that it was more likely to 
•be owing to the castle, which was erected here soon 
after the Conquest, and which was mined during 
the contest between Charles 1. and his parliament. 
Some of the ruins still remain, on the top of a hill 
nearly in the centre of the town, and g^ve it a very 
picturesque appearance. The trade of Llandovery 
consists in the supply of domestic necessaries to 
its inhabitants and those of the surrounding coun- 
try, by whom its weekly markets and fairs are 
very largely attended. The Calvinistic and Wes- 
leyan Methodists and the Baptists, all have chapels 
here. The principal parochial benefaction is the 
Poor's Grove, a tract of about 80 acres of woodland 
in which the indigent inhabitants, especially such 
as are burgesses, have the privilege of cutting fire- 
wood. The petty sessions for the hundred are 
held here, and the lord of the manor occasionally 
holds courts-Ieet. Llandovery has been incorpo- 
rated ever since the time of Richard 111., and the 
charter giyen by him in 1485 was the governing 
one until the passing of the municipal reform act, 
when four aldermen and twelve common council' 
lors were appointed to act under the usual corpo- 
rate style; their public income is very trifling. 
The town is one of the polling -places for the 
county. The Llandovery poor law union com- 
prises eleven parishes, with a population of about 
15,000 persons. Llandovery was the birthplace of 
the Rev. Rees Prichard, vicar of Llandingad, but 
better known by the name of " Vicar of Llando- 
very,'* a man whose writings have obtained an 
almost unexampled degree of popularity in his 
native country. He was bom about the year 
1579, was admitted at Jesus College, Oxford, in 
1597, was ordained a priest in 1602, and took his 
degree of bachelor of arts in the same year. In 
the month of August he was presented by the 



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23 



. LLA 



tnihop of St. David's to the vicarage of his native ' 
place, and was also instituted, in 1613, through 
the gift of the crown, to the rectory of Llanedy. 
In the next year he was made a prebendary of the 
collegiate church at Brecknock, and in 1626, was 
appointed chancellor of the diocese of St David's. 
He died in 1644, and was buried in his own 
chnich. He translated several religious tracts 
into the Welsh language; but the work which 
obtained for him his great celebrity, was the " Can- 
wyll y Cymry," or ** The Welshman's Candle ;** or, 
as it is more generally called, *^ Llyfr-y-Ficer," or 
"* The Vicar's Bo(^." This publication consists of 
a moderately sized 8vo volume, and contains a 
hondred and seventy poems on religious subjects. 
Wood calls them " pious carols,*' and their great 
excellence consists in tho plainness of their lan- 
guage and the musical rhythm of the construction, 
eircumstances which have made them familiar to 
almost every person of all classes in the country, 
M that " the Vicar's Book," is almost invariably 
the companion of the Bible in the cottages in 
Wales. The neighbourhood of Llandovery is en- 
Urenedby several gentlemen's villas.-oM»- Contains 
336 houses: pop"* in 1841, 1,709: probable pop"* 
m 1849, 1,965: ass^*- prop^- £2,414: poor rates 
in 1837, with the pari8h.-o«o-Market day, Friday. 
Fairs : April 17, June 5, August 2, October 22, and 
November 16, for cattle and pigs ; gprand market, 
second Saturday in each month. -«»o-BankerB: D. 
Jones & Co. — draw on Jones, Lbyd, & Co. 

LLANDRILLO, Mehionbth, a parish and vil- 
lage in the hun*^ of Edemion, union of Corwen, 
North Wales, on the river Dee : 197 miles from 
London (coach road 199), 5 from Corwen, 14 from 
LlangoUen. o«ca Nor. West Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry station; 
Llangollen road thence, 20 miles: from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 112 miles.-Me». 
Money orders issued at Corwen: London letters 
deliv^ 10 sum.: post closes 3 p.m. o»e. The Wes- 
leyan and Galvinistic Methodists and Independents 
have chapels here. The parochial charity of £3. 
7s. per annum has been lost to the parish for some 
year8.^a«<>-The living (St TriJlo), a disch^ vicar- 
age, in the archd''' of Montgomery, and diocese of 
St. Asaph, is valued at £7. 17s. Id. : pres. income 
of vicar, according to commutation, £171. 13s. 4d. : 
leetorial thithes (a sinecure), now in the holding of 
eeelesiaatical commissioneiB for England, amount, 
per commntation, to £343. 6s. 8d. : patron, Bishop 
of St Asaph : pres. incumbent, John Wynne : con- 
tains 181 houses: pop"* in 1841, 875 : ass^- prop^^- 
£4,334: poor rates in 1849, £424. Tithes com- 
muted in 1840. ^o«e^ Fairs: Feb. 25» June 29, 
August 28, and November 14, for sheep and 



LLANDRILLO-YN-BHOS, Dehbtob, a parish, 
partly in the hun^ of Is-Dulas, in the above 
county, and partly in the hun^ of Crenddyn, union 
of Cntway, county of Carnarvon : the parish in- 
cludes the township of Eirias: 229 miles from 
London (coach road 233), 4 from Conway, 15 from 
St Aaapb.-cMO'Nor. West Bail, through Crewe 
tnd Chester to Conway, thence 5 miles: from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 129 mile8.-oM>*Money 
otders issued at Conway : London letters deliv*^ 3 J 
P*nL : post closes 8 p«m.*o«»-There is a Wesleyan 



chapel here. The parochial benefactions produce 
about £14. 10s. per annum. -o«o- The living (St. 
Trillo), a vicarage in the archd^* and diocese of St. 
Asaph, is valued at £8. 158. lOd. : pres. net in- 
come, £343 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. 
incumbent, Thomas Parry, 1843 : pop"- in 1841, 
1,176: probable pop^ in 1849, 1,352: poor rates 
in 1838, £741. 

LLANDRINDOD (or Llaw-t-Drindod), Rad- 
nor, a parish in the bun''* of Kevenleece, union of 
Builth, South Wales, east of the river Itlion: 173 
miles from London (coach road 172), 7 from Pen- 
y-bont, 6 from Builth.-oMi-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Oxford to Worcester, thence 55 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham to Worcester, &c., 
126 mile8.-e«ei>Money orders issued at Rhayador : 
London letters deliv^ 12} p.m.: post closes 11} 
a.m.-e*o-This place owes its origin, and the degree 
of importance which it possesses, to three of its 
wells, which rise from springs within a few yards 
of each other, but pour forth waters altogether dif- 
ferent from each other in character, being severally 
chalybeate, cathartic,* and sulphureous in their 
nature. Their beneficial qualities were known 
to the inhabitants as early as the beginning of the 
last century, and persons from a distance began to 
use them for sanitary purposes about the year 
1726. In 1749, lodg^ug-houses and other accom- 
modations for visitors beg^n to be erected, and the 
reputation of the waters for the restoration or 
improvement of health was established. These 
springs are denominated according to their pro- 
perties. That called the Rock Water issues from 
a slate rock, and is strongly impregnated with 
iron, salts, earth, and sulphur : it is especially use- 
ful in all complaints resulting either from wetness 
of the animal fibre or from nervous debility. Tho 
saline spring is efficacious for scorbutic eruptions 
and the gravel. Tho Sulphur or Blaok water is 
used both for bathing and internally ; when applied 
externally it is found beneficial in cases of chronic 
disorder; it is taken with advantage for ulcerous, 
leprous, gouty, and rheumatic complaints. There 
are some trifling charities here. Lead is found to 
some extent in the parish. -o^o- The living (the 
Holy Trinity), a perpetual curacy in the archd^* 
of Brecon, and diocese of St. Di^vid's, is valued at 
£6 : pres. net income, £48 : patron. Prebendary 
thereof: pres. incumbent, T. Thoresby, 1845: 
contains 38 houses: pop°- in 1841, 270: ass*** 
prop3^- £998: poor rates in 1838, £102. 158. 
Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANDRINIO, Montoouebt, a parish in the 
hun^' of Deythur, union of Llanfyllin, North 
Wales, on the northern bank of the Severn : 170 
miles from London (coach road 160), 9 from Os- 
westry, 13 from Shrewsbury. -©•«>-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton to Shrewsbury, thence 
13 miles: from Derby, through Stafford to Shrews- 
bury, &c., 85 miles. o > c» Money orders issued at 
Oswestry: London letters deliv*** 11 a.m.: post 
closes 1^ p.m.-oM»-A Baptist church was formed 
here in 1829. The parochial charities produce about 
£19 ayear.-=»»c^The living (St Trinio), a rectory 
in the diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £24. 168. 
lOJd. : pres. net income, £580 : patron. Bishop of 
St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, John Russell, 1847 : 
contains 152 houses: pop°- in 1841, 896: ass^ 



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24 



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propy- £2,714: poor rates in 1838, £366. Titheg 
oommnted in 1840. 

LLANDRYGAN (or Llandrtoark),. Anglesey, 
a parish in the hnn'* of Llyfon, union of Anglesey, 
North Wales : the parish inclndes the ohapeliy of 
Gwndy : 258 miles from London (coach road 268), 
2 from Gwndy, 10 from Holyhead.-o«>^Nor. West. 
Rail, througl) Crewe, Chester, and Bangor to Bod- 
organ station, thence 7 miles: from Derhy, through 
Crewe, &o., 158 miles, t * Money orders issued 
at Bangor : London letters deiiv^ 10 a.m. : post 
closes 2 p.m.-o«»>There is a Calvinistic Methodint 
chapel here. The parochial charities produce £2. 
5s. per annum.-<Mo-The living (St. Trygan) is a 
perpetual curacy, with that of Bodwrog, in the 
archd'* of Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor : not in 
charge: pres. net income, £125: patron, Jesus 
College, Oxford: pres. inonmhent, H. Griffith, 
1829: contains 89 houses: pop""- in 1841, 485: 
ass^- propy- £1,684: poor rates in 1838, £270. 5s. 

LLANDUDNO, CARKARVoif, a parish in the 
hun*- of Creuddyn, union of Conwy, North Wales, 
on lihe coast of St. GeorgeVfi Channel : 228 miles 
from London (coach road 236), 6 from Conway, 11 
fipom Abergele.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester, to Conway, thence 6 miles: irom 
Derhy, through Crowe, &c, 128 miles. q «o Money 
orders issued at Conway: London letters deliv^ 
3} p.m.: post closes 9} a.m.-oM>.The parochial 
charities produce ahout £17 a year. There are 
extensive copper mines in the parish, which cause 
employment to a gpreat numher of persons in this 
and the adjoining places. The promontory of 
Gogarth, which is so well known to the navigators 
of this part of the coast, presents a gprand precipi- 
tous front to the sea ; the action of the wares hav- 
ing excavated great caverns, vast ]x>th in depth 
and height, in the bases of the clifis. Gulls, cor- 
morants, herons, razor-hills, and other species of 
aquatic birds, have taken up their abode on the 
most inaccessible of the crags; and even the 
pereg^ne &lcon, once so valued for sporting pur- 
poses, still continues a denisen of these rocks. 
Rock samphire is abundantly gathered from the 
precipice of the promontory, of which Shakspeare 
has given in his description of Dover Cliff, in King 
Lear, a beautiful picture — * 

** Como on, Sir; here'n the place. Stand still. How fearful 
And dizzy 'tis to cast one's e^es so low I 
The crows and cbonghs that wing the midway air 
Sliow scarce so gross as beetles. Halfway down 
Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! 
Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. 
The fishermen that walk upon the beach 
Appear like mice; and yon tall anchoring bark 
]>iminl0hed to her boat, her boat a bnoy 
A nrast too small for sight. The marmuriag surge 
That on the uiuinmber^ idle pebbles chafes 
Cannot bo heard so high ;— I'll look no more 
Lest my brain tarn, and the defieiemt sight 
Topple down headlong." 

On an eminence here called Dinas, there is a cir- 
cular space, surrounded by a wall of prodigious 
thickness. Within there are several round caves, 
which are supposed to have been the abodes of the 
aborigines of the country ; they resemble the Trog- 
lodytes of Ethiopia. Near to this curious evidence 
of a remote era, is the Macn Sigl, or Self-Rocking 
Stone, a huge mass, enclosed by a fosse, and ap- 
proached by a naiTow pathway .-o^e^-lTie living 
(St Tudno), a perpetual curacy in the archd^* of 



Anglesey and diocese of Bangor, not in charge : 
pres. net income, £120 : patrons. Archdeacon of 
Merioneth, and Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
J. L. Williams, 1845 : contains 121 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 1,047: ass<>- props'- £981 : poor rates in 
1838, £224. 

LLANDUDWEN, Cakkasvoit, a parish fn the 
hun<*- of Dinllaen, union of Pwllheli, North Wales: 
273 miles Arom London (coach road 248), 5 from 
Pwllheli, 10 from Nevin. ^-e- Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 35 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 173 miles. 
-oMs- Money orders issued at Pwllheli: London 
letters deHv'* at noon : post closes 1 p.m. 3 » e.T he 
living (St. Tudwen) is a curacy, annexed to the 
rectory of Rhin: contains 10 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 86: ass'i' props'- £769: poor rates in 1838, 
£20. 4s. 

LLANDULAS, DEKBroH, a parish in the hun^ 
of Is-Dulas, union of St. Asaph, North Wales, on 
the coast of the Irish Sea: 215 miles from London 
(coach road 218), 3 from Abergele, 9 from Con- 
way. -a*»- Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester to Abergele, thence 3 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 116 miles.-«3*»-Money orders 
issued at Rhyl: London letters deliv^ 9^ a.m.: 
post closes 3} p.m.-««o-The living (St. Ceinbryd), 
a disch*** rectory in the archd^'- and diocese of St. 
Asaph, is valued at £6. Is. 5^. : pros, net income, 
£140: patron. Bishop of St. Asaph: pres. incum- 
bent, O.J. Ilumphroys, 1849 : contains 120 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 514: ass*- props'- £381; poor rates 
in 1838, £58. 10s.^3«>Bron-y-Wendon is the resi- 
dence of Robert Wynne, E-oq., who owns a great 
part of the parish ; Bryndulas, of John Bamford 
Hesketh, Esq.; Bodhyfryd, of Andrew Doyle, 
Esq., as tenant ; and Tanyrallt, of John Jones, Esq. 

LLANDULAS (or Tib- Abbot), Brkcon, a parish 
in the hun*- of Builth, union of Llandovery, South 
Wales : 187 miles from London (coach road 186), 
14 from Builth, 15 from Brecon. -o«>-Gl;. West 
Rail, through Stonehouse and GloucesOor to Mon* 
mouth, thence 45 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 178 miles, 'aa c 
Money orders issued at Builth: London letters 
deliv**- 5 J p.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o»ei-The living 
is a perpetual curacy, in the arehd'* of Bfecon and 
diocese of St. David's: pres. net income, £43: 
patron. Colonel Gwynne: pres. incumbent, Rees 
Williams, 1830: contains 26 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 141 : as8<^ props'- £261 : poor rattts in 1838, 
£23. 28. 

LLANDWF (orLLAinx>w),GiJLHOBOAir, aparish 
in the hun'- of Ogmoro, union of Bridgend and 
Cowbridj;e, South Wales: 186 miles from Jjondon 
(coach road 176), 3 from Cowbridge, 6 from Bridg- 
end.^oM>-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and 
Gloucester to Cowbridge road station, thence 6 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 177 miles.-<we>-Moncy orders issued at 
Cowbridge: London letters dcliv**- 11 j^ a.m.: post 
closes 12^ p.m.-««o.The living (the Holy Trinity), 
a disch*^* rectory, in the archd^* and diocese of 
Llaudaff, is valued at £7. 4s. 4^d. : pres. net in- 
come, £266 : patron, Jesus College, Oxford : pres. 
incumbent, R. Williams, 1807: contains 18 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 125: ass*- props'- £1,610: poor 
rates in 1838, £57. 78. 



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25 



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LLANDWROG (Lower and Upper), Carhar- 
Yov, a paiiflh in tho bun'- of Uwch-Gorfai, union of 
CaraarroD, North Wales : 252 miles from London 
(ooacb road 249), 5 from Carnarvon, 14 from 
Nem.-<Mo-Nor. West Bail, through Crewe and 
Oiester to Bangor, thenoe 14 miles: from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 152 milefl.*<>«ei- Money orders 
issued at Camarron : London letters dcliv^- 4 p.m. : 
post doses 9| a.m. -o«>. There is a Calvinistio 
Methodist chapel here. In 1727, almshonscs for 
twelve decayed maiden gentlewomen were founded 
and endowed here by Mrs. Ellen Glynn. Each 
lady, on her appointrocnt, is required to deposit £5 
towards the forther increase of the charity, but the 
rale is not always insisted upon. The income de- 
rived from the endowment is about £200 a year. 
The parish contains extensive slate quarries. A 
Boman road once ran from here to Segontium, and 
several Koman antiquities have been dug up in 
the Deighhourliood.*e**e^The living (St. Twrog), a 
diflch'- rectory in the archd'* and diocese of Ban- 
gor, is valued at £11. lis. djd. : pres. net income, 
£314: patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
D. Williams, 1836 : contains 426 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 2,688: probable pop"- in 1849, 3,091 : ass*- 
propT- £3,828 : poor rates in 1838, £940. 9s. 

LLANDYBIE, ^or Llardybie), Cabmartiibx, 
a parish in the hun^- of Is Kenan, union of lian- 
deilo-Fawr, South Wales : 246 miles from London 
(eoifih road 207), 6 from IJandeilo-Fawr, 15 from 
Caniiarthen.-«*o*Gt. West. Bail, throq^h Stone- 
boose, Gloucester, Chepstow, and Swansea, to 
Uandeilo-Fawr, thence 6 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 237 
iDi]eB.-«M(>-Moncy orders issued at Llandeilo : Lon- 
don letters deliv*^ 2 p.m.: post closes 9^ a.m.-<3«s.- 
The Independents, Galvinistio and Weslcyan Me- 
thodists, all have chapels here. The parochial 
charities prcMince about £2. ICs. per annum. The 
parish abonnds in coal and lime.-«>*o-The living 
(St. Tibieu) , a disch*^ vicarage in the archdJ^* of 
Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
st£4: pres. net income, £99: patron. Bishop of 
iSt. David's : pres. incumbent, J. Williams, 1804 : 
eontatns 442 houRes : pop"* in 1841, 2,534 : prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 2,914: ass^- prop)"- £5,305: 
poor ntes in 1838, £678.-o«ei-Fiurs : Wednesday 
in Easter week, and first Wednesday in July. 

LLANDYVAILOG (or Llakdefeiloo), Cab- 
■AiniEH, a parish in the bun'* of Cydweli, union 
of Garmaighen, South Wales, east of tho river 
Towi: the parish includes the hamlets of Cilmargh 
and Ishgocd, Kitploith and Portseyborfawr, Llan- 
dyvailog, Holfro, and Iddole : 233 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 235), 6 from Carmarthen, 4 from 
Kidwelly .-«9«e-Gt. West. Bail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 19 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &e., 224 milcs.-oM»-Money orders issued at 
Carmarthen: London letters deUv^ 4 p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-««9-The Calvinistio and Wcsleyan 
Methodists have places of worship hero. The 
parochial charities produce about £3. 10s. per 
annuiii.-«*e>.The living, a vicarage in the arohd^- 
of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, is 
vahicd at £9. Ids. 4d. : pres. net income, £64 : 
patnn. Prebendary of Warthacwm : pres. incum- 
bent, Daniel Jones, 1833: contains 241 houses: 
vol* m. 



pop"- in 1841, 1,303: ass''- prop^ £7,178: poor 
rates in 1838, £585. lis. 

LLANDYFEISANT (or Limitobpetson) , Car- 
marthen, a parish in the huu^- of Cayo, union of 
Llandeilo-Fawr, South Wales: 251 miles irom 
London (coach rood 201), 1 from Llandeilo-Fawr, 
8 from Llangadog.-oooi-Gt. West. Bail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llan- 
deilo- Fawr, thence 1 mile : from Derby, through 
Birmingliam, Gloucester, &c., 242 miles. q» o . 
Money orders issued at Llandeilo : London letters 
deliv*"- 1 p.m.: post closes lOj a.m.-«»o-The ruins 
of Dynefwr casde stand near the churoh. Several 
Bonian romains have been found in the same 
noighbourhood.-««s-Tho living is a perpetual cu- 
racy, in the archd' of Carmarthen, and diocese of 
St. David's: patron. Earl Cawdor: pres. incum- 
bent, H. G. Williams : contains 44 houses : pop"* 
in 1841,267: ass*** prop^^- £1,493: poor rates in 
1838, £98. 138. 

LLANDYFODWG, Glavoroah, a parish in the 
hun*- of Ogmoro, union of Bridgend and Cowbridgo, 
South Wales : 195 miles from London (coach road 
180), 6 from Bridgend, 15 from Neath.^»M^Gt. 
West Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Cliepstow, to Bridgend, thence 6 miles : from Der- 
by, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 186 
roiles.-owai-Monev orders issued at Bridgend : Lon- . 
don letters dcliv^- 8 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.^c^e- 
The manor belongs to the duchy of Lancaster, and 
the inhabitants aro said to be free from aU tolls at 
fairs and markets in England, except those of Oit- 
ford and Cambridge. Coal and iron aro found here 
in abundance. -o«s- The living (St. Tyvodwg), a 
disch^' vicarage in the arohd^^- and diocese of Llan- 
daff, is valued at £63: pres. net income, £89: 
patron, Colonel Turbervill : pros, incumbent, C. 
B. Knight: contains 61 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
338: ass*- prop^- £1,218: poor rates in 1838, 
£125. 

LLANDUFBIOG, Cardigan, a parish in the 
hun**- of Troedyraur, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales, on the northern bank of the Teifi : 
249 miles from London (coach road 230), 1 from 
Newcastle-in-£m1yn, 10 from Cardigan.-o^e^-Gt. 
West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 35 miles : from Der- 
by, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 240 
miles. -9*9- Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv** 6^ p.m.: post closes 9 J p.m. 
-i^i»e>-Tho living (St. Tyvriog), a disch** vicarage 
in the arohd^- of Cardigan, and diocese of St. Da- 
vid'% with the rectory of Llanvair-Trelygcn, is 
valued at £8 : pres. net income, £147 : patron, 
Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, Isaac 
Hughes, 1842: contains 178 houses: pop"* in 
1841,925: ass*- prop^- £2,088: poor rates in 1838. 
£168. lis. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANDYFBYDOG, Anglesey, a parish in the 
hun*- of Twr-Celyn, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales, on the river Dulas : 252 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 267), 2 from Llaneroh-y-Mcdd, 5 
from Amlwch.-o«»-Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Llanfair, thence 10 miles: from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 152 miles.-o»c* Money 
orders issued at Bangor : London letters deliv**- 9 
B.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o»o^The church is very 
ancient, and is said to hnve been founded as early 



Williams, 1845: contains 195 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 1,098: ass*** propy- £3,033: poor rates in 
1837, £447. 158.-o«e^Fair, November 8, for cattle, 
horncs, and pedlery. 

LLANEGRYN, Mcrioneth, a parish in tlio 
bun**' of Tal-y-Bont, union of Dolgelly, North 
Wales, boandcd on the west by Cardigan bay, and 
on the east by the river Disynwy : the pariah in- 
cludes the townships of Peniarth and Rbydyrhin : 
129 miles from London (coach road 209), 12 from 
Dolgelly, 16 from Machynleth. -«•«- Nor, West. 
Kail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Oswestry, tlience 52 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 144 miies.-o«c^ Money 
orders issued at Corwen : London letters deliv*^- 3^ 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-<^<c»A school here is en- 
dowed with £G7 per annum, one third of which is 
applied for the apprenticing of children. There is 
a Wesleyan Methodist chapel here.-««:^The living 
(St. Egryn), a perpetual curacy in the archd^* of 
Merioneth, and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £5. 
6s. 8d. : pres. net income, £82 : patron, Eldward 
Tetlcy, £sq.^ pres. incumbent, Thomas Jones, 
1814: contains 149 houses: pop"- in 1841, 745: 
ass'i- propy- £3,115: poor rates in 1838, £528. 



1 6s. -o«c>> Peniarth Fawr, the residence of Evan 
Rowland; Peniarth Ucha, of G. J. Scott, Esq. 

LLA.NEGWAD, Caemabthbm, a parish in the 
bun^"' of Elvet and ("athinog, union of Llandilo- 
Vawr, South Wales, on the river Cothi : 257 miles 
from London (coach road 208), 7 from Llandilo- 
Fawr, 9 from Carmarthen. -«mo Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehousc, Gloucester, Chepstow and 
Swansea, to Llandilo-Vawr, thence 7 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingliam, Gloucester, &c., 248 
miles. -o«ci-Moncy orders issued at Llandilo-Vawr: 
London letters deliv*^- 2§ p.m.: post closes 9 a.m. 
-e*c=-Thcre is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. 
-o*--The living (St. Egwad), a vicarage in the 
archd^- of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £8. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £259 : 
patron, Bishop of St. David*s : pres. incumbent, E. 
Evans, 1844: contains 425 houses: pop°*in 1841, 
2,113: probable i)op»- in 1849, 2,430: ass**- prop^- 
£6,706: poor rates in 1837, £1,124. 48. 

LLANEIGRAD (or Llaneugrad), Akqlesey, a 
parish in the bun'- of Twrcelyn, union of Anglesey, 
North Wales : the parish includes the chapelry of 
Llanallgo: 261 miles from London, 9 from Gwlndy, 
10 from Beaumaris.^3*e^Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Bodorgan station, 
thence 10 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
161 miles. -ow?" Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv'** noon: post closes noon.-o«ca- 
The living (St. Eugrad), a rectory with the curacy 
of Llanallgo, in the archd^- of Anglesey, and dio- 
cese of Bangor, is valued at £9. lis. lO^d. : pres. 
net income, £135: patron. Bishop of Bangor: 
pres. incumbent, J. Griffith, 1834 : contains 130 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 331 : ass**- prop^^- £1,390: 
poor rates in 1838, £151. 

LLANELHATARN (or Llahaelhaiajut), Cab- 
NAKVON, a parish in the hun^ of Uwch-Grorfai, 
union of Pwllheli, North Wales, on Carnarvon 
bay : 263 miles from London (coach road 245), 9 
from Pwllheli, 11 from Carnarvon. q * c i Nor. West. 
Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 
25 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 163 



mile8.-«:^c^Monev orders issued at Pwllheli : Lon- 
don letters deliv*'^ 1 p.m. : post closes at noon.-o«»- 
The living (St. Aelhaiam), a disch**- rectory in the 
archd^- and diocese of Ban^s^or, is valued at £6. 13s; 
4d. : pres. net income, £225: patron, Bishop of 
Banpor: pres. incumbent, J. W. Ellis, 1845: con- 
tains 120 houses: pop"- in 1841, 660: ass**- prop''- 
£1,956. 

LLANELIAN, Akglesbv, a parish in the hnn<** 
of Twr-Celyn, union of Anglesey, North Wales, 
on the coast of the Irish sea: the parish includes 
the chapelry of RhOs-Peirio: 271 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 274), 2 from Amwlch, 7 from 
Llanerch-y-med. -««ei- Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, thence 8 miles : 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 171 miles.-o»ci- 
Money orders issued at Bangor: London lettera 
deliv**- 10 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m.-o«c^The church 
is said to have been founded in the year 450 by 
St. Hilary. There is a Calvinistic Methodist cha- 
pel here. Much of the copper ore extracted from 
the Parys mountain is exported from this place. 
A lighthouse and a signal-staff have been erected 
here.-o«o-The living (St. Eilian), a disch**- rectory 
with the curacies of Coedanan or Riios-Peirio, in 
the diocese of Bangor, is valued at £14. Is. 8d. : 
pres. net income, £400: patron. Bishop of Bangor: 
pres. incumbent, John Owen : contains 314 houses : 
pop"' in 1841, 1,439: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,655: ass^' prop^' £1,198: poor rates in 1838. 
£379. 2s. 

LLANELIAN, Denbigh, a parish in the hon^- 
of Is-Dulas, union of Conway, North Wales: 217 
miles from London (coach road 230), 5 from 
Abergele, 8 from Conway .-o»c^Nor. West, Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Abergele, thence 5 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &o., 117 milesi. 
-o«>Money orders issued at Rbyl : London letters 
deliv*** 10 a.m. : post closes 2^ p.m.^»*«^ There is a 
Calvinistic Methodist diapel here.-<3«c>.The living 
(St. Hilary), a disch*^- rectory in the archd^- and 
diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £11. Is. Sd.: 
pres. net income, £249: patron. Bishop of St. 
Asaph : pres. incumbent, Thomas Alban, 1831 : 
contains 121 houses: pop"* in 1841, ()04: ass^ 
propy- £1,604: poor rates in 1838, £334.-^^ 
Fairs : Monday after Easter week, July 26, Oct. 
5, and Dec. 6, for cattle. 

LLANHELIDAN, Denbigh, a parish in the 
hun*^ and union of Ruthin, North Wales, on the 
river Clydd : 202 miles from London (coach rood 
211), 6 from Ruthin, 12 from Denbigh .-^^^Nor. 
West. liail. through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Wrexham Regis, thence 15 miles: from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 117 
nules.-oM>Money orders issued at Ruthin : London 
letters doliv^* 10^ a.m. : post closes 2^ p.m.'««o- 
There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The 
parochial charities produce About £32 a year.^oM^i. 
The living (St. Elidan), a rectory in the archd^- 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £16 : pres. net 
income, £252: patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. 
incumbent, Robert Roberts, 1819: contains 142 
houses: pop" in 1841,962: ass**- prop^- £2.829 : 
poor rates in 1%37, £551. lOs. Tithes commuted 
in 1839.-o»ci-Fair, Thursday before Palm-Sunday. 

LLANELIEU, Brecon, a parish in the bun'* of 
Talgarth, union of Hay, South Wales: 172 miles 




from London (coach road 161), 5 from Hay, 12 
from Brecon.^awa^Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
hoiiae and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 30 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 163 miles.-e^c Money orders issued at 
Hay: London letters deliv^ 11 a.m. : post closes 
at noon. -oMa. This parish participates in a fund 
left by Mr. Rice Powel for apprenticing children. 
-o«c.-The living (St. Ellyw), a disch*- rcctoiy ui 
the archd''* of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £4. 68. 3d. : pros, net income, £90 : 
patron. Earl of Ashbumham : pres. incumbent, J. 
Jones, 1849: contains 18 houses: pop" in 1841, 
103 : ass^ prop^- £699 : poor rates in 1837, £45. 
lis. 

LLANELLEN, Mosmouth, a parish in the hun'- 
and union of Abergavenny, on the western bank 
of the Usk, and crossed by the Brecon Canal: 158 
miles from London (coach road 143), 2 from Aber- 
gavenny, 8 from Pontypool."OM>-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonchousc and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 16 miles : firom Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 149 miles. o»o Money orders 
issued at Abergavenny : London letters deliv*** 8 
a.m. : post closes 4} p.m.^e*o-The charities pro- 
duce about £7 a year.-cM<»-The living, a disch*** 
vicarage in the arohd^* and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £8. lOs. 7d. : pres. net income, £105: 
patron, T. Swinnerton : contains 2,480 acres : 89 
houses: pop«- in 1841, 342: ass'*- prop^^- £1,49G : 
poor rates in 1838, £208. 38. 

LLANELLTYD (or Luhttltto), Merioneth, a 
pariah in the hun^ of Ardudwy, union of Dolgelly, 
North Wales, on the river Maw : 240 miles from 
London (coach road 203), 1 from Dolgelly, 8 from 
Barmouth.-o«»-Nor. West, Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton, Shrewsbury, and Oswestry, to Welsh- 
pool, thence 45 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 157 miles.-o«>-Money orders 
issued at Corwen : London letters deliv*^ 1 p.m. : 
poet closes 10 a.m.-oM>.There is a Calvinistic Me- 
thodist chapel here. The ruins of Cymmer Abbey 
are m this parish.^o«3^Th6 Hving (St. lUtyd), a 
perpetual curacy in the arehd^- of Merioneth, and 
diocese of Bangor: preii. net income, £62 : patron, 
G. H. Vaughan : pres. incumbent, George PhUlips, 
1833: contains 70 houses: pop"*- in 1841, 504: 
tm^ props'- £1,168: poor rates in 1838, £124. 4s. 

LLANELLY, Bbbgov, a parish in the bun*** and 
union of Grickhowel, South Wales, crossed by the 
Newport and Brecknock Canal : the parish inolades 
the parcels of Aberbaidan and Moesg^artha: 163 
miles from London (coach road 152), 5 from Aber- 
gavenny, 6 from Crickhowel.-o«e-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 21 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 154 miles, -o«<a-Money orders 
iaraed at Abergavenny : London letters deliv^* 9 
a.m. : post closes 3 J p.m.-oM»-There is an Indepen- 
dent and Wesleyan Methodist chapel here. The 
parochial charities produce about £30 a year. 
Uyndoch Iron- works are in the vicinity ; and coal, 
iron, and limestone, are found in the parish.^^s^^- 
The living (St. Ellyw), a curacy, subordinate to 
the rectory of Llangattock : contains 778 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 7,366: probable pop"- in 1849, 8,171 : 
ass**- propJ^- £6,661 : poor rates in 1838, £575. 128. 
•««»>Titbes commuted in 1839. 



LLANELLY, CARifARTHEN, a parish, borough, 
and market town, in the hun^- of Camwallan, union 
of Llanelly, South Wales, situated on an estuary 
formed by the river Loughor and the sea, and in- 
tersected by the Llanelly Railway: the parish 
comprises the hamlets of Berwick, Glyn, Westoac, 
and Hengood : 224 miles from London (coach road 
217), 15 from Cannnrthcn.-o*o-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Llanelly station: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 215 miles. -owa^Money orders 
issued here : London letters deliv**- 4 p.m. : post 
closes 7J a.m.-s>«»-The town, which is irregularly 
built, has undergone great improvement of late 
years, many old and dilapidated dwellings having 
been removed, and exceUent dwelling-houses and 
good ranges of shops having been erected in their 
stead. A new and convenient market-house has 
boen built by Mr. Chambers, the lord of the layor- 
age at the port, and a very large landed proprietor, 
who resides within the town. A number of new 
houses have also been built along the road to Cao 
Mawr Issa. The churoh is a singular edifice, hav- 
ing two towers, one of which terminates in an 
embattled parapet, while the other is surmounted 
by a spire. The Baptists, Independents, and Wes- 
leyan Methodists have chapels here. The neigh- 
bourhood of the place abounds in mineral produce, 
and Llanelly therefore has an active and thriving 
trade. The principal article of export is coal, in 
the working of which more than 500 persons are 
constantly employed. The shipments of the pro- 
duce they raise amount to as much as 170,000 
tons per annum. The coal is of fine quality, and 
benides being largely supplied coastwise for home 
consumption, is sent to Malta, Marseilles, Odessa, 
Constantinople, Suez, Mocha, Bombay, Bahia, and 
other distant ports, being extensively used for the 
formation of steam, especially in vessels. The 
other commerce of the place consists in the export 
of iron, copper-cake, and sheathing, and the im- 
portation of copper ore. There are several iron 
and copper works in the town and neighbourhood, 
and a trade for the supply of the district is car- 
ried on in grain, llie amount of the customs 
dues received at the port reaches to between 
£5,000 and £6,000 a year. The markets are 
well supplied with provisions. Great enterprise 
has been exhibited in facilitating the trade of the 
place, by the construction of docks and railways. 
Of the former, one is a floating basin, capable 
of admitting vessels of 170 or 180 tons register; 
another can admit vessels of 500 tons register. 
The graving dock of the railway is admirably con- 
structed, and a breakwater extends from one end 
of it, which enables vessels to lie at ail times in 
smooth water. Each dock ha; a scouring reser- 
voir attached to it, and there is besides these a 
reservoir of great capacity for scouring the harbour 
and the channel. The Llanelly railway traverses 
a rich mineral district as far as LlandUo Yawr; it 
is twenty-six miles in length, and was constructed 
at an expense of £270,000. It was at first in- 
tended only for the transit of goods, but an excel- 
lent passenger traffic developed itself soon after the 
opening of the line. Llanelly is a borough, having 
a portreeve and burgesses, who have a public in- 
come of about £425 a year, but whence or on what 




account they acquired their corporate capacity 
docs not clearly appear. The town is lighted with 
gas, and is well supplied with water. In conjunc- 
tion with Carmarthen it now returns one member 
to parliament. The Llanelly poor-law union com- 
prises nine parishes, with a population of about 
16,600 8oul8.-o«a^The living (St. EUiw), a disch'*- 
vicarage in the archd^* of Carmarthen, land diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £6. Gs. 8d. : pres. net 
income, £96 : patron, R. 6. Thomas : pres. incum- 
bent, Eben. Morris, 1820: contnins 1,403 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 11,155: probable pop"- in 1849, 
12,828 : ass**- prop^- £15,501 : poor rates in 1838, 
£2,674. 13s.'o«e-Market day, Tuesday. Fairs: 
Ascension-day, and Sept. 30, cattle and horses. 
^SM»-Bankcr8 : Bank of South Wales — draw on 
Bamett, Hoares, & Co.^sM»-Inn8 : Ship and Castle. 
Ilotels : Thomas's Arms, and Falcon. 

LLANELWETHY, Radnor, a parish in the 
hun*- of Colwyn, union of Builth, South Wales, 
north of the Wye: 187 miles from London (coach 
road 173), 1 from Builth, 11 from Rhayader.-o*c^ 
6t. West. Rail, through Stonehonse and Gloucester 
to Monmouth, thence 45 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 178 miles. 
-oM^Moncy orders issued at Builth : London let- 
ters deliv^ 2} p.m.: post doses 7 p.m.-oM.^A 
school here is endowed with a farm-rent of £16 a 
year.-o*=*The living (St. Matthew), a perpetual 
curacy in the archd^- of Brecon, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £6: pres. net income, £70: 
patron, E. D. Thomas, Esq. : pres. incumbent, W. 
J. Thomas, 1838 : contains 34 houses : pop°- in 
1841, 197 : ass<^- prop^- £955: poor rates in 1838, 
£102. 13s. 

LLANDDWYNN, Merionbth, a parish in the 
hun**- of Ardudwy, union of Dolgelly, North Wales, 
at Cardigan Bay : 250 miles from I^oudon (coach 
road 214), 5 from Barmouth, 1 from Harlech.-<3M>- 
Nor. West. RaiL through Wolverhampton, Shrews- 
bury and Oswestry, to Welshpool, thence 55 miles : 
from Derby, through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 
167 mile8.-o«> Money orders issued at Corwen: 
London letters deliv^* 4 p.m. : post doses 9 p.m. 
-o«s-There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapd here. 
The charities produce about £19 a year.-oM.^The 
living (St. Enddwyn), a rectory with the curacy 
of Llandwy ve, in the archd^- and diocese of Bangor, 
is valued at £10. 18s. 1 ^d. : pres. net income, £287 : 
patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, Richard 
Davies : contains 179 houses : pop"* in 1841, 940 : 
BM^- prop3^ £1,951 : poor rates in 1837, £183. 5s. 

LLANDDEINOL-FAB, (or Llanddahiel), An- 
OLESET, a parish in the hun*^- of Menai, union of 
Bangor, and Beaumaris, North Wales : 244 miles 
from London (coach road 257), 5 from Llangefni, 
6 from Bangor. o « & Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester, to Bangor, thence 6 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 144 miles. o > c» 
Money orders issued at Llangefni. -o«e>-The living, 
a curacy annexed to the vicarage of Llanidan: con- 
tains 94 houses: pop"- in 1841, 407: ass'' prop^* 
£1,391 : poor rates in 1838, £214. lis. 

LLANENGAN, (or Eimionfrbnin), Carnarvon, 
a parish in the hun^- of Comitmaen and Gafflagian, 
union of Pwllheli, North Wales : 278 miles from 
London (coach road 248), 5 from Pwllheli, 10 from 
Nevin.-o«>Nor. West Rail, through Crewe and 



Chester, to Bangor, thence 40 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 178 mUes.-e«»- Money orders 
issued at PwUhdi : London letters deliv*^ at noon : 
post doses 1 p.m.-e«e^The Calvinistic Methodists, 
and the Independents, have chapels here. The 
charities produce about £5. 10s. per annum. The 
parish lies on the harbour called the St. Tudwall's- 
roads, one of the best anchorages on the Welsh 
coast. Near the coast there are two small islands 
called St. Tudwall's, on one of which there are the 
ruins of a chapel.-e«e^The living (St. Einion) a 
discharged rectory in the archd''* and diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £17. 6s. 5}d. : pres. net in- 
come, £398 : patron, Bishop of Bangor : pres. in- 
cumbent, W. Williams, 1841 : contains 212 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1,063: ass*^ prop^"* £2,060: poor 
rates in 1838, £235. Ss. 

LLANENGUENEL (or Llantkhbhxdle), Aa- 
QLBSET, a parish in the hun'* of Llyfon, union of 
Anglesey, North Wales, bounded on the west by 
Holyhead bay : 269 miles from London (coach road 
272), 6 from Holyhead, 10 from Aberfraw.-o«e^ 
Nor. West. Rail. Uirough Crewe and Chester, to 
Holyhead, thence 6 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &o., 169 miles."«3«<»-Money orders issued at 
Holyhead : London letters deliv^- 9 a.m. : post 
doses 4 p.m.-««»-Tbe living (St. Enghenel), a cu- 
racy subordinate to the rectory of Llanfachreth : 
contains 69 houses : pop"* in 1841, 445 : ass**- prop'* 
£1,076: poor ntes in 1838, £210. 3s. 

LLANERCH-FROCHWELL, (or Llaneroh- 
rochwell), Montgomery, a township in the parish 
of Guilsfield, in North Wales — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.): 179 miles from London, 3 from 
Welshpool, 7 from Llanfair.-««»-(Retnm8 with 
the parish.) 

LLANERCH-Y-MEDD, Anoleset, an extn- 
parochial ville and market-town in the hnn^ of 
Menai, union of Anglesey, North Wales : 253 miles 
from London (coach road 265), 6 from Amlwch. 
-oM>.Nor. West. Rail, through Orewe, Chester, and 
Bangor, to Ghierwen station, thence 8 miles : from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 153.-o«>Money orders 
issued at Bangor : London letters deliv*^ 8-30 a.m. : 
post doses 3-35 p.m. q * c i There is a snuff manu- 
factory here. The Independents, Baptists, and 
Calvinistic Methodists have chapels here.-«Mc*-The 
living (St. Mary), a curacy subordinate to the rec- 
tory of Llanbeulan : contains 15 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 64: poor rates in 1838, £ll.^»«:^Market-day, 
Wednesday. Fairs: Jan. 1, March 10, April 4, 
May 6, June 23, July 26, Aug. 2, 14, Oct 2, Nor. 
13, and three next Wednesdays. 

LLANERFYL, MoMTGOMSRr, a parish in the 
hun^ of Mathrafal, union of Llanfyllin, North 
Wales, on the river Banw: 208 miles from London 
(coach road 189), 5 from Llan£ftir, 13 from Llan- 
fyllin.-oM»Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhamp- 
ton, Shrewsbury, and Oswestry, to Welshpool, 
thence 13 miles : from Derby, through Stafibrd and 
Shrewsbury, &o., 215 miles, -a^o Money orders is- 
sued at Welshpool: London letters deliv^ 12^ a.m. : 
post doses 12^ p.m, o»o A school here is endowed 
with £32 a year.-D*c-The living (St. Erval), a 
rectory in the archd^* and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £9. 28. lid: pres. net income, £308: 
patron. Bishop of St Asaph : pres. incumbent, L. 
Richard, 1837 : contains 185 houses : pop"* in 1841, 



LLA 



81 LLA 



1,000: tttf'- propy* £2,586- poor rates in 1838, 
£395. 48.^o«e^Fair, Maj 7. 

LLANEUGRAD. See Llaheiorad. 

LLAN FABON, Gulmobgah, a parish in the hxra^ 
of GierphiUy, anion of Merthyr-TTdvil, South 
Waies, in the line of the Merthyr-l'^dvil canaL 
The parish includes the hamlets of Qarth and 
OlyD-minney : 201 miles from London (coach road 
165), 5 from Caerphilly, 8 from Merthyr-TydTll. 
-oM^^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehonse, Glonces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Merthyr-Tydvil, thence 8 
miles: firom Derby, tiiroogh Birmingham and Glou- 
cester, &C., 192 miles.-e«s.-Money orders issued at 
Oudiff: London letters deliv^ at noon ; post closes 
at noan.-<Mo.The liring (St. Mahon), a curacy sub- 
Qtdinate to the Ticarage of Eglws-llan : contains 
163 houses : pop"* in 1841, 1,449 : probable popl- 
in 1849, 1,666: ass"^ prop^- £1,480: poor rates in 
1838, £243. 38. 

LLAKFAGHRETH, Anolebbt, a parish in the 
hon**- of Tal-y-BolioD, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales, situated on a small stream wluch flows into 
Holyhead bay : 270 miles from London (coach road 
271), 7 from Holyhead, 9 from Llanerch-y-med. 
-«*»Nor. West. RaiL through Crewe and Ciiester, 
to Holyhead, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 178 mile8.-<Me>-Money orders issued at 
Holyhead: Londcm letters deliV^ 9) a.m. : post 
doses 3) p.m.-<Mo.The charities produce about 
£2. 2s. a ye«r.^o«ci-The liring (St. Machraeth), a 
discharged rectory with the curacies of Llanyn- 
henedle and Llanfigael, in thearchd^- of Anglesey, 
and diocese of Bangor: pres. net income, £557: 
patron, Bisbop of Bangor: pros, incumbent, John 
Jones: contains 80 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 493: 
ass^ prop7- £1129 : poor rates in 1838, £98. 3s. 

LLANF ACHRETH, Mbbiohbtr, a parish in the 
hnn'- of Tal-y-bout, union of Ddgelly, North Wales, 
east of the rirer Maw : 233 miles from London 
(coach road 204), 4 from Dolgelly, 12 from Bala. 
Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton, Shrows- 
bory, and Oswestry, to Welshpool, thence 38 miles: 
from Derby, through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 
148 miles. o«o Money orders issued at Corwen: 
London letters deliv'* 2) p.m. : post closes 9^ a.m.: 
-"MtxThere are two CalTinistic Methodist chapels 
liere.-<Ma-The liying (St. Maclireth), a perpetual 
curacy in the archd''- of Merioneth and diocese of 
Bangor, is yalued at £8 : pres. net income, £92 : 
patron Sir R. W. Vanghan, pres. incumbent, Geo. 
Fhillips, 1833 : contains 183 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
956: ass^ prop^"* £3,850: poor rates in 1838, 
£483. 4s. 

LLANFAELOG, Akolbsby, a parish in the 
bun^ of Uyfon, union of Anglesey, North Wales, 
on the coast of St George's Channel: 272 miles 
finom lymdon (coach road 270), 6 from Gwindy, 9 
from Holyhead. ^0.0- Nor. West. RaiL through 
Cmrnt and Chester to H(4yhead, thence 9 miles : 
Inm Derby, through Crewe, &c., 172 miles.-eM» 
Money orden' issued at Bangor: London letters 
deliv^ 11 a.m. : post closes 1 p.m.-«Mc»>Thero is a 
Galfimstie Methodist chapel hero. The parochial 
charities produce about £2 a year.-<Mc>-Tlie living 
(St Maelog), a curacy subordinate to the rectory 
of Uanbeulan : contains 128 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
786: ass^ prop7- £1,067: poor rates in 1838, £166. 
14s. 



LLANFAELRHYS, Carvaryov, a parish in the 
hun^ of Comitmaen, union of Pwllheli, North 
Wales: 278 miles from London (coach road 256), 
13 from Pwllheli, 4 from Bardsey Isle. -ovs^-Nor. 
West. RaiL through Crowe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 40 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
178 miles. -ow^-Money orders issued at Pwllheli : 
London letters deUv^- 2 p.ra. : post closes 11 a.m. 
o>o The charities produce about £10. lOs. a year. 
-oMi^The living (St Maelrhy's), a curacy subordi- 
nate to the vicarage of Aberdaron: contains 43 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 236 1 ass'* prop^* £629: 
poor rates in 1838, £67. Ss. 

LLANFAES (or Llanvaes), Ahglesey, a parish 
in the hun^ of Tyndaothwy, union of Bangor and 
Beaumaris, North Wales : 243 miles from London 
(coach road 252), 1 from Beaumaris, 5 from Ban- 
g^r.-«M»-Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Ches- 
ter to Bangor, thence 5 miles: from Derby, through 
Crowe, &c., 143 miles.-«»e^Money orders issued at 
Beaumaris : London letters deliv^* 8) a.m. : post 
closes 5 p.m.-««ei-ln 1823, Lady Bulkeley left 
£1,000 for the poor of the parish, which was laid 
out in the pnrohase of government stock. The 
remains of Castlebar-Llienawg yet exist here, as 
also part of a Franciscan priory, erected in 1240. 
o»o The living (St Catherine), a perpetual curacy, 
with that of Penmon, in the arohd^* and diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £6. 12s. : pres. net income, 
£180: patron. Sir R. B. W. Bulkeley, Bart: pres. 
incumbent, H. D. Owen, 1843: contains 53 houses: 
pop^' in 1841, 268 : ass'* prop^- £1,560 : poor rates 
in 1838, £153. 17s. 

LLANFAETHLU (or Llaiifabthlt), Ahole- 
SBT, a parish in the hun^ of Tal-y-BoUon, union of 
Anglesey, North Wales : 272 miles from London 
(coach road 274), 9 from Gwindy, 9 from Holy- 
head. --mo- Nor. West. RuL through Crewe and 
Chester to Holyhead, thence 9 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 172 miles.-oM>.Money orden 
issued at Bangor : London letters deliv'* at noon : 
post closes at noon. -<»«ei- The charities produce 
about £9 a year.-otto-The living (St. Maethla), a 
rectory, with the curacy of Llanfwrog, in the 
arohd^'' of Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor, is 
valued at £16. 17s. Id. : pres. netincome, £636: pa- 
tron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, W. John- 
son, 1844: contains 80 houses : pop"* in 1841, 483: 
ass<L prop^* £1,508 : poor rates in 1837, £332. 15s. 

LLANFAGLAN, CAjmABvov, a parish in the 
bun'* of Isgorfsi, union of Carnarvon, North Wales, 
on the eastern bank of an estuary formed by the 
Menai Straits : 248 miles from London (coach road 
252), 3 from Carnarvon, 16 from PwllhelL o»o 
Nor. West Rail, through Crewe and Chester to 
Bangor,, thence 10 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 148 miles.-«M>-Monoy orders issued at 
Carnarvon : London lettere deliv^ 3} p.m. : post 
closes 10 a.m.-eM»-The living (St. Baglan) is a 
curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Llanwndn: 
contains 36 houses: pop"* in 1841, 205: ass**- 
prop}"- £886 : poor rates in 1838, £98. 14s. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIRpDYFFRYN-CLWD, Diwbioh, a 
parish in the hun^ and union of Ruthin, North 
Wales, on a branch of the Clydd : 200 miles from 
London (coach road 203), 2 from Ruthin, 12 from 
I Corwen.-o«e-Nor. West. RaiL through Wolver- 



1 1 



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32 



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hanipton and Shrewsbury to Wrexham- Regis, 
thence 13 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &c., 115 milcfl. -o«o- Money orders 
issued at Ruthin : Loudon letters deHv*^- at 9} a.m.: 
post closes 3^ p.m.-o*o-The charities produce about 
£71 per annum. -3«>- The living (St. Mary), a 
vicarage in the arcluF- and diocese of Bangor, is 
valued at £13. 3s. 4d. : pres. net income, £261 : 
patron. Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, E. J. 
Owen, 1848: contains 247 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
1,254 : probable pop"- in 1849, 1,442 : asB**- piop^"- 
£6,581 : poor rates in 1837, £1,036. 

LLANFAIR-GAEREINION, MoKraOMEBY, a 
parish and market town in the hun^* of Mathrafel, 
union of Llaufyliin, North Wales : 203 miles from 
London (coach road 184), 8 from Welshpool, 10 
from Ncwtown.-o»c»-Nor. West. Rail, through Wol- 
verhampton, Shrewsbury, and Oswestry, to Welsh- 
pool, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 118 milo8.-o»c^Money or- 
ders issued at Welshpool : London letters deliv*^* at 
noon : post closes at noon.-oM^The parochial cha- 
rities produce about £5. lOs. per annum. There 
are an Independent, a Wosleyan Methodist, and a 
Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The petty ses- 
sions for the hundred are held in the market-house, 
and the lord of the manor holds two courts-leet 
annually .-©•o-The living (St. Mary), a disch**- vi- 
carage in the arohd^- and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £10 : pres. net income, £338 : patron, 
Bishop of St. Asaph : pros, incumbent, T. G. 
Moulsdale: contains 567 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
2,747: probable pop"- in 1849, 3,159: ass'^propy- 
£6,323 : poor rates in 1838, £1,416. 16fl. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. -«>m». Market day, Saturday. 
Fairs: Feb. 19, March 29, May 19, July 26, Oct. 
3, Nov. l,Dec. 19. 

LLANFAIR-AR-Y-BRYNN, Carmarthen, a 
parish in the bun**- of Perfedd, union of Llandovery, 
South Wales : the parish indudes the hamlets of 
Rhandir Abbott, Rhandir Ganol, Rhandir Issa, and 
Rhandir Uchaf : 231 miles from London (coach road 
191), 1 from Llandovery, 15 from Lampeter.-eM>- 
Gt.We8t. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Neath, thence 25 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 222. •«»«>- 
Money orders issued at Llandovery : London let* 
ters deliv*^' at noon : post closes at noon.-*Mo.The 
ruins of a Roman station may still be traced here. 
Lead is found in the parish.-o*c»>The living (St. 
Mary) is a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of 
Lland^ngat: contains 271 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
1,649: probable pop" in 1849, 1,896: ass*- prop^- 
£6,665: poor rates in 1838, £679. 12s. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. 

LLANPAIR-CLYDOGAU, Cardigan, a parish 
in the hun^ of Moyddyn, union of Lampeter, South 
Wales: 267 miles from Loudon (coach road 214), 
3 from Lampeter, 8 from Tregaron.-o«o-Gt. West 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, Chepstow, 
andLlanelly, thence 17 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &o., 258 miles. -o«=»- 
Money orders issued at Lampeter : London letters 
deliv**- 5 p.m.: post closes 9 p.m.-o*=>-The living 
(St. Mary), a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of 
Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£4 : pres. net income, £65 : patrons, Earl of Lis- 
bum, and Lord Carringtou, alternately : pies, in- 



cumbent, M. Williams, 1842: contains 88 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 471: ass'*- prop^- £1,910: poor 
rates in 1838, £106. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-FECHAN, Carnarvon, a parish in 
the hun*^' of Uchaf, union of Bangor and Beau- 
maris, North Wales, on the sea-coast : 229 miles 
from London (coach road 235), 9 from Bangor, 7 
from Conway .-=>«3-Nor. West. Bail, through CYewe, 
Chester, and Conway, to Penmaenmaur stadon, 
thence 1 mile : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
129 miles. -o«o> Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv*^- 9} a.nL: post closes 4^ p.m. 
-«>M»^Adjoining this parish are the Lavan Sands, 
comprising 96 square miles, which are supposed to 
have been inundated by the sea, and never re- 
covcred.-o*>-The living, a discli'** rectory in the 
archd^- and diocese of Bangor, is valncd at £6. 178. 
6d. : pres. net income, £305: patron, Bishop of 
Bangor : pres. incumbent, J. V. Vincent, 1835 : 
contains 118 houses: pop" in 1841, 747: ass**- 
propy- £1,143: poor rates in 1837, £337. lOs. 

LLANFAIR-MATHAFARN-EITHAF.Anole- 
SET, a parish in the hun^ of Tyndaethwy, union of 
Anglesey, North Wales, on the western side of 
Redwhiurfe Bay: 251 miles from London (coach 
road 259), 8 from Beaumaris, 5 from Llanereh-y- 
med.-«M>^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe, Cliester, 
and Bangor, to Llanfair station, thence 7 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 151 mile8.-«»«c- 
Money orders issued at Beaumaris: London let- 
ters deliv**- 10 a.m. : post closes 3J p.m.-o«»-In 
the churchyard there is a modem carnedd, com> 
posed of a rude heap of stones, 5 feet in height, 
18 long, and 12 wide. Beneath there is a sort of 
cavern, the entrance of which, after the ancient 
Jewish fashion, is closed with a stone. The whole 
was constructed under the directions of a gentle- 
man named Wynne, and it has long formed the 
burial-place of his family. Llanfair-Mathafam 
was the birth-place of Goroner Owen, the son of a 
labourer, bom in 1722, who rose through great 
ability and exertion to be a clergyman of the 
Church of England, and is said to have been the 
best Welsh poet of modem times.^cMe^The living 
(St. Mary) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory 
of Llanddyfnan: contains 165 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 741 : ass*- prop^- £633 : poor rates in 1838, 
£146. 7s. 

LLANFAIR-IS-GAER, Carnarvon, a parish in 
the hun** of Isgorfai, union of Carnarvon, North 
Wales, on the eastern banks of the Menai : 245 
miles from London (conch road 252), 3 from Carnar- 
von, 7 from Bangor. -o«c^ Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Clicstcr to Bangor, thence 7 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 145 milc8.-o»»- 
Money orders issued at Carnarvon : London letters 
deUv''- 3j^ p.m. : post closes 10 a.m.-oMa*Thero is 
a Calvinistic Methodist chapel hero.-oM»Tho liv- 
ing (St. Mary), a perpetual curacy in the archd^* 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £3. 68. 8(1. : 
pres. net income, £77 ; patron. Bishop of Bangor : 
pros, incumbent, Evan Williams, 1835: contains 
68 houses: pop" in 1841, 549: ass'^propy* £1,394: 
poor rates in 1838, £221. 14s. 

LLANFAIR-JUXTA-HARLECH, Merionbtii, a 
parish in the hun^ of Ardudwy, union of Fcstiniog, 
North Wales : 232 miles from London (coach road 
230), 9 from Barmouth, 1 from Harlech.-o*e>-Nor« 



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83 



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Wett.Ra}l.tbrongh Wolyerliampton and Shre wsbary 
to Oswestry, thence 55 miles: from Derby, thn>ugh 
Stafford, Sbrewsbary, &c., 147 mile8.-o«o-Monoy 
orders issaed at Corwen : London letters deliv^* 5 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-«ttei-The liring (St. Mary), 
s rectory in the diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£6. lOs.: pres. net income, £165: patron, Bishop 
of Bangor : pres. incumbent, J. G. Davies, 184G : 
contains 79 houses: pop^ in 1841, 464: ass*'- 
prop^' £1,204: poor rates in 1837, £315. 98. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-NANTYGOF, Pbmbboks, a parish 
in the hnn^ of Dewisland, union of Ilaverford- 
West, South Wales : 274 miles from London 
(coach road 257), 9 from Haverford-West, 7 from 
Newport-<Mo.6t. West. Kail, through Stonehouse, 
Gkocester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence GO 
miles: firom Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 265 miles. o» o Money orders issued at 
Harerford-West : London letters deliv^- 9} a.m. : 
post closes 7^. p.m.-««>>The living is a curacy 
rabordinate to the rectory of Letterston : contains 
43 houses : pop"* in 1841, 237 : ass"*- prop^ £270 : 
poor rates in 1838, £90. IBs. 

LLANFAIB-NANTYGWYN. Pembroke, a 
parish in the hun^ of Kemess, union of Cardigan, 
Soath Wales : 259 miles from London (coach road 
245), 6 from Cardigan, 13 from Narbeth.-Mc»Gt. 
West RaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, und 
Cihepstow, to Swansea, thence 45 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 250 
mfles.-«Mo^Money orders issued at Cardigan : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 9 J p.m.: post doses 8^ p.m.^o«»- 
The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^* of 
Gaidiganf and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£3: pres. net income, £70: patron, T. Bowen, 
£«]. : pies, incumbent, Wm. James, 1844 : con- 
tains 45 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 241 : ass*^ prop^^- 
£998 : poor rates in 1838, £74. 12b. 

LLANFAIB-ORLLWYN, Cardioan, a parish 
in the bun'* of Troedyraur, union of Newcastle-in- 
Emlyn, South Wales, on the northern bank of the 
Teifi: 247 miles from London (coach road 226), 
4 from Newcastle, 14 from Carmarthen.-o«e-Gt. 
West Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 35 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 238 
miles.-<Mo^Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv^ 7 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-<Me.The living, a dlsch^ rectory in the archd^* 
of Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £4. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £155: patron. 
Bishop of St David's : pres. incumbent, Thomas 
Uoyd, 1831 : contains 82 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
397: ass^ prop'- £1,084: poor rates in 1838, 
£138. 15s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-PWLL-GWYNGYLL, Aholesbt, 
a parish in the bun'* of Tyndoethwy, union of 
Bugor, North Wales, on the western bank of the 
Henai straits : 242 miles from London (coach road 
254), 3 from Bangor, 6 from Beaumaris.^-oM>-Nor. 
Wes. Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Uanfair station : from Derby, through Crewe, 
&a, 142 milc8.'«»M»>Money orders issued at Ban- 
gor: London letters deliv*'* 8 a.m. : post closes 6 
p.m.-«Mei>The living, a rectory with the curacy of 
Llondjsilio, in the orchd'- of Anglesey, and dio- 
oeie of Bangor, is valued at £6. 15s. : pres. net 
voL.in. 



income, £250: patron, Bishop of Bangor: pros, 
incumbent, Richard Pritchard, 1785: contains 
102 houses: pop"- in 1841, 617: ass^- prop''- 
£586 : poor rates in 1838, £176. 86. 

LLANFAIR-TALHAIARN, Denbigh, a pa- 
rish in the hun^* of Is-Aled and Is-Duios, union 
of St. Asaph, North Wales, on the river Elwy : 
217 miles from London, 4 from Abergele, 7 from 
Denbigh. --3«c^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester, to Abergele, thence 4 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 117 miles.-«»w=^Money orders 
issued at Rliyll: London letters deliv**- 9} a.m. : 
post closes 3^ p.m.-3M>.0ne of the schools here is 
endowed with about £7 a year.-o«e^The living (St. 
Talhaiam), a perpetual curacy in the diocese of 
St. Asaph, is valued at £34: pros, net income, 
£145 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incum- 
bent, D. M. Evans, 1847 : contains 254 houses : 
pop"' in 1841, 1,416: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,628: ass'*- prop^- £2,741: poor rates m 1838, 
£736. 78. 

LLANFAIR-TREHELYGON, Cabdigan, a pa- 
rish in the huu^- of Troedyraur, union of New- 
castle-in-Emlyn, South Wales: 251 miles from 
London (coach road 225), 10 from Cardigan, 5 
from Newcastle. q*c » Gt West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swan- 
sea, thence 37 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 242 miles.-^>«c^ Money 
orders issued at Cardigan : London letters deliv**- 
10 p.m. : post closes 7^ p.m.-o«=i-The living St. 
Mary) is a rectory annexed to the vicarage of 
Llandyvriog : contains 22 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
108 : ass^- prop]"- £309 : poor rates in 1838, £38. 
lOs. 

LLANFAIR-YN-EUBWLL (or Llakpair-yh- 
Kwbwll), Anolesef, a chapclry in the parish of 
Rhos-Coiyn — (which see for access, &c.) — North 
Wales: 271 miles from London, 5 from Holyhead, 
12 from LlangofuL-e^o^Mocey orders issued at 
Holyhead: London letters deliv'^' 9 a.m. : post 
closes 4 p.m.-'<3M>-The living is a curacy subordin- 
ate to the rectory of Rhos-C6lyn : contains 56 
houses : pop"* in 1841, 357 : ass^* prop^^- £619 : 
poor rates in 1838, £138. 7s. 

LLANFAIR-YN-GHORNWY, Auolesey, a 
chapelry in the parish of Llanddcusaint — (which 
see for access, &c.) — North Wales : 275 miles 
from London, 8 from Gwindy, 9 from Amlwch. 
-o«o Money orders issued at Rangor: London 
letters deliv*^- 11^ a.m. : post closes 12 j p.m.^o«o^ 
The living is a curacy subordinate to the rectory 
of Llanddcusaint: contains 60 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 357: ass**- prop^- £1,180: poor rates in 
1838, £140. 9s. 

LLANFAIR-YN-Y-CWMMWD, Anglesey, a 
chapelry in the parish of Llanidan — (which see for 
access, &c.) — North Wales : 253 miles from Lon- 
don, 4 from Carnarvon, 6 from Bangor.-««c^The 
living is a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of* 
Llanidan. — (Returns with the parish.) 

LLANFALLTEG (or Llanvalteo), Carmar- 
then, a parish, partly in the bun**- of Derllys, in 
the above county, and partly in that of Dung- 
leddy, union of Narbertli, county of Pembroke: 
249 miles from London, 5 from Narberth, 17 from 
Carmarthen.-eM>-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 



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32 



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hampton and Shrowsbnry to Wrcxlmm-Rogis, 
thence 13 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &c., 115 miles. -««o- Money orders 
issued at Ruthin : London letters deliv'* at 9} a.m.: 
post closes 3^ p.m.-eM»The charities produce about 
£71 per annum. -3«o-Tlio living (St. Mary), a 
vicarage in tho archd^- and diocese of Bangor, is 
valued at £13. 38. 4d. : pres. net Income, £261 : 
patron. Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, E. J. 
Owen, 1848: contains 247 houses: pop'* in 1841, 
1,254 : probable pop"- in 1849, 1,442 : ass**- piop*^- 
£6,581 : poor rates in 1837, £1,036. 

LLANFAIR-OAEREINION, MoOTOOinsBY, a 
parish and market town in the hun^' of Mathrafel, 
union of LLinfyllin, North Wales : 203 miles from 
London (coach road 184), 8 from Welshpool, 10 
from Nowtown.-o«c-Nor. West. Rail, through Wol- 
verhampton, Shrewsbury, and Oswestry, to Welsh- 
pool, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 118 miles.-o»ci-Money or- 
ders issued at Welshpool : London letters deliv*^- at 
noon : post closes at noon.-oM^The parochial cha- 
rities produce about £5. 10s. per annum. There 
are an Independent, a Wesleyan Methodist, and a 
Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The petty ses- 
sions for the hundred are held in the market-house, 
and the lord of the manor holds two courts-leet 
annually .-©•o-The living (St. Mary), a disch**- vi- 
carage in the archd^* and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £10 : pres. not income, £338 : patron, 
Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, T. G. 
Moulsdale: contains 567 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
2,747: probable pop"- in 1849, 3,159: as8*>propy- 
£6,323 : poor rates in 1838, £1,416. 16s. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. -«•«>- Market day, Saturday. 
Fairs: Feb. 19, March 29, May 19, July 26, Oct. 
3, Nov. l,Dec. 19. 

LLANFAIR-AR-Y-BRYNN, Carmarthen, a 
parish in the bun'- of Perfedd, union of Llandovery, 
South Wales : the parish includes the hamlets of 
Rhandir Abbott, Rhandir Ganol, Rhandir Issa, and 
Rhandir Uchaf : 231 miles from London (coach road 
191), 1 from Llandovery, 15 from Lampeter.*o«s^ 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonefaouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Neath, thence 25 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 222.-<»«e-- 
Money orders issued at Llandovery : London let- 
ters deliv'- at noon : post closes at noon.^o«»-The 
ruins of a Roman station may still be traced here. 
Lead is found in the parish. o > c» The living (St. 
Mary) is a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of 
Lland^ngat: contains 271 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
1,649 : probable pop" in 1849, 1,896: ass*- prop^- 
£6,665 : poor rates in 1838, £679. 12b. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-CLYDOGAU, Cardigan, a parish 
in the hun*^ of Moyddyn, union of Lampeter, South 
Wales: 267 miles from Loudon (coach road 214), 
3 from Lampeter, 8 from Tregaron. -o«o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, Chepstow, 
and Llanelly, thence 17 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 258 miles, ^occ^ 
Money orders issued at Lampeter : London letters 
dcUv**- 5 p.m.: post closes 9 p.m.-o*=»-The living 
(St. Mary), a perpetual curacy in the arohd''* of 
Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£4 : pres. net income, £65 : patrons, Earl of Lis- 
bum, and Ijord Carrington, alternately : pres. in- 



cumbent, M. Williams, 1842: contains 88 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 471: ass*** prop^- £1,910: poor 
rates in 1838, £106. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-FECHAN, Carnarvon, a parish in 
the bun**' of Uchaf, union of Bangor and Beau- 
maris, North Wales, on the sea-coast : 229 miles 
from London (coach road 235), 9 from Bangor, 7 
from Conway .^3»ei-Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe, 
Chester, and Conway, to Penmaenmaur station, 
thence 1 mile: from Derby, through Crowe, &c., 
129 miles. -otfo> Money orders isened at Bangor: 
London letters deliv*^ 9} a.m.: post closes 4^ p.ni. 
7«>MSi^ Adjoining this parish aro the Lavan Sands, 
comprising 96 squaro miles, which aro supposed to 
have been inundated by the sea, and never re- 
covered.-o«e»The living, a discli**- rectory in the 
arohd^- and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £6. 17s. 
6d. : pres. net income, £305: patron. Bishop of 
Bangor : pres. incumbent, J. V. Vincent, 1835 : 
contains 118 houses: pop" in 1841, 747: ass**- 
propy- £1,143: poor latos in 1837, £337. lOs. 

LLANFAIR-MATHAFARN-ElTHAF,ANaLF.- 
SBY, a parish in the bun'* of Tyndaethwy, union of 
Anglesey, North Wales, on tho western side of 
Redwharfe Bay: 251 miles from London (coach 
road 259), 8 from Beaumaris, 5 from Uaneroh-y- 
med.-Mo.Nor. West. Rail, through Crowe, Cliestcr, 
and Bangor, to Llanfair station, thence 7 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &o., 151 mile8.-o»«=- 
Money orders issued at Beaumaris: London let- 
ters deliv*- 10 a.m.: post closes 3) p.m.-o.o^In 
the churohyard thero is a modem camedd, com- 
posed of a rude heap of stones, 5 feet in height, 
18 long, and 12 wide. Beneath there is a sort of 
cavern, the entrance of which, after the ancient 
Jewish fashion, is closed with a stone. The whole 
was constructed under the directions of a gentle- 
man named Wynne, and it has long formed tlie 
burial-place of his family. Llanfair-Mathafam 
was tho birth-place of Goroner Owen, the son of a 
labouror, bom in 1722, who rose through great 
ability and exertion to be a clergyman of the 
Churoh of England, and is said to have been the 
best Welsh poet of modem time8.-eM».The living 
(St. Mary) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory 
of Llanddyfnan: contains 165 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 741 : ass^- prop]"- £633 : poor rates in 1838, 
£146. 78. 

LLANFAIR-IS-GAER, Carnarvon, a parish in 
the hun*^- of Isgorfai, union of Carnarvon, North 
Wales, on tho eastern banks of the Menai : 245 
miles from London (conch road 252), 3 from Carnar- 
von, 7 from Bangor. -o«c^ Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 7 miles: 
from Dorby, through Crewe, &c., 145 mile8.-o«e»- 
Money orders issued at Carnarvon : London Icttere 
deUv^- 3j^ p.m. : post closes 10 a.m.«<>«ei*Thero is 
a Calvinistic Methodist chapel hore.-oM».Tho liv- 
ing (St. Mary), a perpetual curacy in the arohd'- 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £3. 6s. 8d. : 
pres. net income, £77 s patron. Bishop of Bangor : 
pres. incumbent, Evan Williams, 1835: contains 
68 houses: pop" in 1841, 549: ass'- prop)"- £1,394: 
poor rates in 1838, £221. 14s. 

LLANFAIR-JUXTA-HARLECH, Merioneth, a 
parish in the hun'* of Ardudwy, union of Festiniog, 
North Wales : 232 miles from London (coach road 
230), 9 from Barmouth, 1 from Harlech.-««»-Nor« 



L 



Wett.Ba]l«thi-onghWolTer]iainpton and Slirewsbury 
to Oswestry, thence 55 miles: from Derby, through 
Stafford, ffluewsbary, &c., 147 miles.-«Mo-Monoy 
orders issued at Ck)rwen : London letters deliY**- 5 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-eMB^The living (St. Mary), 
a rectory in the diocese of Bangor, is valned at 
£6. 10s. : pres. net income, £165 : patron, Bishop 
of Bangor: pres. incambent, J. G. Davies, 1846: 
contains 79 houses: pop*'* in 1841, 464: ass"^- 
prop^' £1,204: poor rates in 1837, £315. 98. 
Tithes commnted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-NANTYGOF, PfeMBSOKB, a parish 
in the bnn^ of Dewisland, union of Haverford- 
West, South Wales: 274 miles from London 
(coach road 257), 9 from Haverford-West, 7 from 
Newport.^oKi.Gt. West Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 60 
miles: from Derby, through Blrminghlim, Glou- 
cester, &C., 265 mile8.«ow:^Money orders issued at 
HaTerford>West : London letters deliv^* 9^ a.m. : 
post doses 7^. p.m.-««>>The living is a curacy 
subordinate to the rectory of L^tterston : contains 
43 houses : pop°- in 1841, 237 : ass^- prop^ £276 : 
poor rates in 1838, £90. 16s. 

LLANFAIE . NANTYGWYN, Pbmbboke, a 
parish in the hun^ of Kemess, union of Cardigan, 
South Wales : 259 miles from London (coach rood 
245), 6 Irom Cardigan, 13 from Narbeth.*o«o-Gt. 
West. RaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, und 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 45 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 250 
miles.-«MoMoney orders issued at Cardigan : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 9} p.m. : post closes 8^ p.m.^aK>> 
The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd'- of 
Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£.3: pres. net income, £70: patron, T. Bowen, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, Wro. James, 1844 : con- 
tains 45 houses: pop"* in 1841, 241 : ass*^ prop'^* 
£998 : poor rates in 1838, £74. 128. 

LLANFAIR-ORLLWYN, Cardigan, a parish 
in the hun^ of Troedjrraur, union of Newcastle-in- 
Emlyn, South Wales, on the northern bank of the 
Teifi: 247 miles from London (coach road 226), 
4 from Newcastle, 14 from Carmarthen.-«M»-Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 35 miles: frt)m 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 238 
miles.-o»o-Money orders issued at Carmarthen : 
London letters deliv^ 7 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
« p T he living, a disch"* rectory in the archdJ^* 
of Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £4. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £155 : patron. 
Bishop of St. David's : pres. incumbent, Thomas 
Lloyd, 1831: contains 82 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 
397: ass^ prop]'- £1,084: poor rates in 1838, 
£138. 15s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFAIR-PWLL-GWYNGYLL, AiioLissBr, 
• parish in the bun'* of Tyndaethwy, union of 
Bangor, North Wales, on the western bank of tlie 
Menai straits : 242 miles from London (coach road 
264), 3 from Bangor, 6 from Beaumaris.-ow^-Nor. 
Wes. Rail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Llanfair station : from Derby, through Crewe, 
&a, 142 miles. q»e » Money orders issued at Ban- 
gor: London letters deliv*^- 8 a.m.: post closes 6 
p.m . i a > e The living, a rectory with the curacy of 
Llandysilio, in the archd'* of Anglesey, and dio- 
cese of Bangor, is valued at £6. 15s. : pres. net 

VOL. III. 



income, £250: patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. 
incumbent, Richard Pritchard, 1785: contains 



102 houses: pop"* in 1841, 617: ass*- prop^^- 
£586 : poor rates in 1838, £176. 8s. 

LLANFAIR-TALHAIARN, Denbigh, a pa- 
rish in the hun^* of Is-Aled and Is-Dulas, union 
of St. Asaph, North Wales, on the river Elvvy : 
217 miles from London, 4 from Abergele, 7 from 
Denbigh. --3«c^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester, to Abergele, thence 4 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 117 miles.-o-e^Money orders 
issued at RhyU: Liondon letters deliv^* 9i a.m.: 
post closes 3^ p.m.^9«e»ODe of the schools here is 
endowed with about £7 a year.-o«e^The living (St. 
Talhaiai'n), a perpetual curacy in the diocese of 
St. Asaph, is valued at £34: pres. net income, 
£145 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incum- 
bent, D. M. Evans, 1847 : contains 254 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 1,416: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,628: ass**- prop^^- £2,741: poor rates in 1838| 
£736. 78 

LLANFAIR-TREHELYGON, Cardigan, a pa- 
rish in the hun**- of Troedyraur, union of New- 
castle-in-£mlyn. South Wales: 251 miles from 
London (coach road 225), 10 from Cardigan, 5 
from Newcastle, -o*:^ Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swan- 
sea, thence 37 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 242 mile8.-3«c:^Money 
orders issued at Cardigan : London letters deliv*^- 
10 p.m. : post closes 7^ p.m.^o^o'The living St. 
Mary) is a rectory annexed to the vicarage of 
Llandyvriog: con tA ins 22 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
108 : ass*- prop^- £399 : poor rates m 1838, £38. 
10s. 

LLANFAIR-YN-EUBWLL (or Llaotaibtn- 
Kwbwll), AMOussEr, a chapelry in the parish of 
Rhos-Colyu — (which see for access, &c.) — North 
Wales: 271 miles from London, 5 from Holyhead, 
12 from Llangefni.^eMci^Mocey orders issued at 
Holyhead: London letters deliv*^- 9 a.m. : post 
doses 4 p.m.-'««»-The living is a curacy subonlin- 
ate to the rectory of Rhos-C61yn: contains 56 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 357: ass*** prop^^* £619: 
poor rates in 1838, £138. 7s. 

LLANFAIR -YN-GHORNWY, Amolesey, a 
chapelry in the parish of Llanddeusaint — (which 
see for access, &c.) — North Wales: 275 miles 
from London, 8 from Gwindy, 9 from Amlwch. 
-o«o Money orders issued at Bangor: London 
letters deliv*^- 11) a.m. : post closes 12 j p.m.->9«ei- 
The living is a curacy subordinate to the rectory 
of Llanddeusaint: contains 60 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 357 : ass*- prop^- £1,180 : poor rates in 
1838, £140. 9s. 

LLANFAIR. YN-Y-CWMMWD, Anglesbt, a 
chapelry in the parish of Llanidan — (which see for 
access, &c.) — North Wales : 253 miles from Lon- 
don, 4 from Carnarvon, 6 from Bangor.-e«c>^The 
living is a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of* 
Llanidan. — (Returns with the parish.) 

LLANFALLTEG (or Llanvalteo), Carhab- 
THEK, a parish, partly in the hun**- of Derllys, in 
the above county, and partly in that of Dnng- 
leddy, union of Narbertli, county of Pembroke: 
249 miles from London, 5 from Narbcrth, 17 from 
Cannarthen.->9M>-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Cliepstow, to Swansea, 



LLA 34 

thence 35 miles : from Derby, throagh Birming- 
ham, Glouoesterf &c., 240 raiie8.-«3*«»-M<Miey orders 
issued at Narberth : London letters deliV*- 9 
p.m.: post closes 7 J p.m. -o4e»- Th^ living (St. 
Mall teg), a disch*- rectory in the archd^' of Car- 
marthen, and diocese of St. David's, is v^ued at 
£4: pres. net income, £144: patron, Bishop of 
St. David's : pres. incumbent, K. Hughes, 1841 : 
contains 78 houses: pop"- in 1841, 399: ass'*- 
propy- £1,280 : poor rates in 1838, £113. 178. 

LLANFARETH (or Llanvaretd), Radkoh, a 
parish in the hun^* of Colwyn, union of Builth, 
South Wales, on the eastern bank of the Wyo : 
182 miles from London (coach road 172), 2 from 
Builth, 13 from New Radnor.-o«^Gt. West. Rail. 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 40 miles: from Derby thi'ough Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 173 miles. -©•o- Money or- 
ders issued at Builth : London letters deliv**- 2) 
p.m. : post closes 7 p.m. -o«c> The living (St. 
Mary) is a curacy subordinate to the rectory of 
Aber-Eddw : contains 28 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
163: ass«>- prop^- £992: poor rates in 1838, 
£99. 3b. 

LLANFAWR, Merioneth, a parish in the hun**- 
of Penllyn, union of Bala, North Wales, on the 
northern bank of the Dee : the parish includes the 
townships of Bettws, Gam, Penmacm, and Rhe- 
wardog: 223 miles from London (coach road 193), 
1 from Bala, 20 from Llangollen.-o»c»-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Llangollen, thence 43 miles : ttom Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 138 miles.-o«ei- Money 
orders issued at Corwen : London letters deliv^ 
11 J a.m. : post closes 12 J p.m.-a»c^The paix)- 
chial charities produce about £72 a year.-««>"The 
living (St. Deiniol): contains 343 houses : pop"- in 
1841, 1,836 : probable pop" in 1849, 2,111 : ass** 
propy- £8,509 : poor rates in 1837, £869. 8b. 

LLANFECHAN (or Llanpechain, or Llan-yn- 
mechaih) , Montgouert, a parish in the hun^ of 
Pool, union of Llanfyllin, North WaleB : 187 miles 
from London (coach road 186), 10 from Oswestry, 
10 from Welshpoo!.-o»c-Nor. West Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &c., 102 miles.-o»o-Money orders is- 
sued at Oswestry : London letters deliv*** 11 a.m. : 
post closes 1} p.m.<oM>-The living (St. Garmon), a 
rectory in the archd''- and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £8. 15s.: pres. net income, £530: pa- 
tron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, James 
Price, 1800: contains 120 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
733 : poor rates in 1838, £390. 138. Tithes com^ 
muted in 1839. 

LLANFECHAN. See Llan-Afan-Feobait. 

LLANFECHAN, Montgomery, a township in 

the parish of Llanwrin — (which see for access, &c.) 

— North Wales : 203 miles from London, 4 from 

•Machynlleth, 23 from Llanfair. — (Returns with 

the parish.) 

LLANFECHEL, A^'GLE8EY, a parish in the 
bun** of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales: 277 miles from London (coach road 272), 
9 from Gwindy, 6 from Amlwch.-o»o-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, 
thence 14 miles: fcpm Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
177 miles.-oM>-Money orders issued at Bangor: 



LLA 



London letters deliv^* noon : post cloecB noon.-<««»> 
Many of the inhabitants are employed in the ad- 
jacent Parys copper mines. -o«»- The living (St. 
Mecheli or Macutus), a disch*^- rectory in tlie 
archd^- and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £1L 
lis. 3d.: pres. net income, £300: patron, Bishop 
of Bangor: pres. incumbent, Roger Edwards: 
contains 206 houses : pop"* in 1841, 1,062 : ass^ 
propy* £2,333: poor rates in 1638, £395.^>«»- 
Fairs : Feb. 125, Aug. 5, Sept. 6, and Nor. 5 and 
26. 

LLANFEDW (or Llakvbdow), GLAiiORaAN« a 
hamlet in the parish of Michnelston-fedw — (whicb 
see for access, &c.) — South Wales : 1 55 miles from 
London, 6 from Cardiff, 7 from Newport. '«>o 
Money orders issued at Cardiff: London letters 
deliv^- 10) a.m.: post closes 1) p.m.-<»«9-0Dntains 
47 houses : pop"* in 1841, 337 : poor rates in 1838, 
£222. 4s. 

LLANFERRAS, Dekbtgr, a parish in thd hiin<>* 
of Yale, union of Ruthin, North Wales, on the^river 
Alyn: 200 miles -from London, 4 fcom Mold, 6 
from Ruthin, 13 from AVrexham.-<Moi-Nor. WesL 
Rail, to Mold, thence 4 miles: from Derbyi 
through Crewe, Chester, &o., 95 miles. o >c » Money 
orders issued at Mold or Ruthin: London letters 
deliv*^ 9 a.m. : post doses 3 p.m. o« o The charities 
produce about £40 a year. e»o The living (St. 
Berres), a disdi*'* rectory in the archd'^- and dio- 
cese of St. Asaph, is valued at £14. 8s. 1 )d. : pres. 
net income, £295: patron. Bishop of St. Asaph! 
pres. incumbent, C. B. Clougfa, 1821: oontaaas 
124 houses: pop*** in 1841, 778: ass^ prop^^* 
£1,960: poor rates in 1838, £283. 12a. 

LLANFYRNACH, Pembbou, a parish in the 
hun^ of KemesB, union of NewcasUe-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales: 254 miles from London (coach roa4 
236), 9 from Cardigan, 9 from Newca8a6.^Me>lGt 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester^ luad 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thebce 40 miles; from 
Derby, through Birmingham, GloVicest^r, &o., 246 
miles. I 3 B 6 . Money orders issued at Cardigan : Lon- 
don letters deliv'* 10 p.*i. : post doses 7i p.m. 
-aw--There ure several chalybeate springs, cod an 
abundance of lead ore in the pariah, om c Th6 livings, 
a disch^ rectory in .the arohd^* of Cardigan, and 
diocese of St. Daidd's, is valued lit £10; pres. net 
income, £176: patron. Lord Chancellor: pres. in* 
cnmbent, Hugh Howell, 1844t eontains 199 houses: 
pop**- in 1841, 1,049: aas*^ props'- £2,183 i poor 
rates in 1838, £196. 98. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANFEUGAN (or Llanvioak), Bbscon, a par- 
ish in the hun^* of Pen-Kelly, union of Brecon, 
South Wales: the parish includes the hamlets of 
Glynn-Collwu and R»n-Kelly : 175 miles firom Lon^ 
don (coach road 169), 5 from Brecon, 12 from Crick- 
howell.-o«>-Gt. West. Rail, through fitonehouse and 
Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 33 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 166 
miles.-oM^Money orders issued at Brecon t London 
letters deliv^- 10 a.m.: post closes 2 p.m.-«*e- 
The living (St. Yeugan, or Meugan), a rectory^ 
with the curacy of Glynn, in the curchd^'of Brecon, 
and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £20. lOs. : 
pres. net income, £480 : patron. Trustees of tlie 
late Rev. C. Clifton: pres. incumbent, C. Williams, 
1847: contains 134 houses: pop""* in 1841, G62: 




•M^ propy- £5,5C8; poor rates in 1838, £321. 
10& 

LLANFFINNAN, Akoleset, a parish in the 
ban^ of Menai, union of fiangor and Beanmaris, 
North Wales : 244 miles from London (coach road 
257), 7 finom Beaamaris, 7 from Bangor.^oM^-Nor. 
West Rail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Uanfair, thence 2 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 144 miles.-c>«»-Money orders issued at 
Beaamaris : London letters dcliv^* 10 a.m. : post 
closes 3} p.m. o ^ o Some trifling charities belong 
totheparisfa.-o«^The living (St. Finnan), a curacy 
subordinate to that of Llanfibangel- Ysceifiog : con- 
tains 28 houaes: pop"- in 1841, 153: ass^ prop^* 
£788: poor rates in 1838, £88. 6s. 

LLANFFLEWYN, Ahgleset, a parish m the 
hun^ of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales: 271 miles from London (coa^ road 275), 
9 from Gwindy, 9 from Amlwch«-riMc>-Nor. West. 
Rail through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, 
tbence 8 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
171 miles, ' o m a M<mey orders issued gt Bangor: 
London letters deliv'- at noon : post closes at noon. 
-«»o-The church here is very ancient.-o«o^The Ht- 
ing is a curacy subordinate to the'Tectory of Llan- 
Khyddlad: contains 18 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
136 : ass'L prop^- £545 : poor rates is 1838, £34. 

128. 

LLANFIHANGEL. See Luahfuqail. 

LLANFIH ANGEL- GLYN-Y-MYFYK, Dw- 
BioH,*a parish in the hun'* of Is-Alcd, union of 
Corwen, in the above county, and partly in that of 
Edemion, county of Merioneth, North Wales, on 
the river Alwin : it includes Cefynpost: 199 miles 
from London (coach road 204), 2 from Cerrig, 13 
from Denbigh.--Mci-Nov. West, Rail, through Wol- 
verhampton and Shrowsbury to Llangollen, thence 
20 miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrows- 
bury, &c., 114 mi1e8.'0«c»^Ioney orders issued at 
Corwen: London letters deliv*** 11 a.m. : post 
closes 1 p.ro.-o«c>-Thero is a Calvinistic Methodist 
church here. q > p The living (St. Michael), a disch^' 
rectory in the ardid^- and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £6. 12s. : pres. net income, £215 : patron. 
Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, William 
Lewis, 1847 : contains 82 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
427 : 98B^ prop^- £@16 : poor rates in 1838, £142. 
19s. 

LLANFIHANGEL (Uppbr and Lower), Mont- 
eoMKRT, a parish in the hnn^- and union dT LUp- 
fyllin. North Wales: 207 miles from London (eoach 
road 193), 4 from Llaufyllin, 9 from Llanfair.«e«(>- 
Nor. Weat RaiL through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Welshpool, thence 12 miles : from 
Derby, tiuroagh Stafford, Shrowsbury, &c., 122 
iniles.-oM»>Money orders issued at Oswestry : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 11^ a.m. : post closes 1 p.m. 
-oM>.One of the schools here is endowed with £18 
per annum .-e«>-The living (St. Michael), a rectory 
in the archd^- and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued 
at £5. 158. 5d.: pres. net income, £334: patron, 
Bishop of St. Asaph : pros, incumbent, R. Fugh : 
contains 160 houses: pop°- in 1841, 1,041 : 4S8^ 
prop''- £3,862 : poor rates m 1838, £480. 

LLANFIHANGEL-ABERBYTHYCH. Cab- 
XARTRBX, a parish in the hun^ of Is-Kennen, union 
of Llandeilo-Fawr, South Wales, on the southern 
bank of the Towy : 254 miles from London (cQach 



road 205), 4 from Llandeilo-Fawr, 13 from Cai:- 
marthen.^oM>.Gt. West. Rail, through Stonohouse^ 
Gloucester, Clicpstow, and Llanelly, to Llandeilo- 
Fawr, thence 4 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c.^ 245 miles. -oao^Money 
orders issued at Llandeilo : London letters deliv^* 
1^ p.m. : post closes 10 a.m.-oMr-'Tbe parish forms 
part of the duchjr of Lancaster. -ovo^The living 
(St. Michael) , a perpetual curacy in the archd''' of 
Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's : pres. net 
income, £72: patron, Eari Cawdor: pres. incum- 
bent, H. G. Williams, 1838: contains 182 houses : 
pop" in 1841, 948 : ass*- prop^- £2,817 : poor rates 
in 1838, £272. 14s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGEL-ABERECORVIN, Cabmab- 
TBEN, a parish in the hun*- of Derllys, union of 
Carmarthen, South Wales, on the northern bank of 
the rivec Taff : 242 miles from London (coach road 
241), 8 from Carmarthen, 2 from IJanghame. ■o* » 
^•e»Gt. West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Glouce^ 
ter, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 28 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
233 miles. -eM>- Money orders issued at CarmaN 
then : London letters deliv*- 4} p.m. : post closes 
9 p.m."o*c^There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel 
hero. In the churchyard thera are three ancient 
tombs, called *the Pilgrims' TQmbs.'^<:>*o-The liv- 
ing (St. Michael), a cdrscy annexed to the vicarage 
of Mydrim : contains 158 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
819: ass** prop^- £4,780: poor rates in 1838, 
£373. 16s.-=>»<^Fairs : May 5, and Oct. 10. 

LLANFIHANGEL-ABERGW^ISSIN, Bbbcob, 
a parish in the bun*- and union of Builth, South 
Wales: 187 miles from London (coach road 188), 
15 from Builth, 18 from Rhayader.^»«c^Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, 
thence 55 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 178 miles.'-<>«c» Money orders 
issued at Builth : Ijondon letters deliv** 6 p.m. : 
post closes 3^ p.m.-o*e-The living (St. Michael), 
a curacy annexed to the vicarage of Llanaianfawr : 
contains 55 houses: pop"- in 1841, 311: ass** 
prop''- £886 : poor rates in 1838, £64. 16s* 

LLANFIHANGEL-AR-ARTH,Cabiiabthx9, a 
parish in the bun** of Cathinog, union of Newcastlo- 
in-£mlyn, South Wales, on the southern btmk of 
the Teifi : the parish includes the hamlets of Cwm- 
Arlloes, FrO, Gwydd CrClg, Gwyddll, and Pencader: 
265 miles from London (eoach road 222), 15 from 
Carmarthen, 11 from Newcastle. -«•»- Gt. Weat. 
Rail, thfough Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Llandilo-Yawr, thence 15 miles: from 
Derby, through ^i]rqlingham, Gloucester, &c., 256 
miles. ■■ Q Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters d^iv*- 6t p.m. : post doses 8 p.m. 
-CMM>-The living (St. Michael), a disch** vicarage in 
the arobd?^' of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £6. 6s. 8d. : pros, net in- 
come, £127: patron, W, I^ewis and £, Lloyd, 
Esqis., alternately : pres. incumbent, Thomas 
Lewis, 1818: contains 426 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
1,993 : probable pop"" in 1849, 2,292 : ass*- prop^- 
£4,841 : poor rates in 1838, £913. Ss. 

LLANFIHANGEL-BACUALLETH, Cabnab- 
voN, a parish in the bun*- of Gyfflogian, union of 
PwUbeli, North Wales: 268 miles from London 
(coach road 248), § from Pwllheli, 5 from Nevin. 
-<9«e-Nor. West. Rail, throngn Crewe and Chester 



to Bangor, thence 30 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 168 milep.-o«c^Money orders issued at 
Pwllheli: London letters deliv*** at noon: post 
closes 1 p.m.-o^o-The living is a curacy annexed 
to the rectory of Llanbadrig: contains G3 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 333: ass**- prop^- £1,347 : poor rates 
in 1838, £152. Is. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGEL-BRYN-PABWAN, Brecon, 
a parish in the hun**- and union of Builth, South 
"Wales, east of the Wye : the parish includes the 
hamlets of Llanfihangel and Rhosterig: 182 miles 
from London (coach road 18G), 13 from Builth, 5 
from Rhayader. -»«=-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Ross, thence 50 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
173 mile8.^9«=>-Money orders issued at Builth: 
London letters deliv**' 5^ p.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-o«<=^The living is a curacy annexed to the vicarage 
of Llanafanfawr : contains 65 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 384: ass'* prop^- £1,364: poor rates in 
1838, £119. 7b. 

LLANFIHANGEL - CASTELL - GWALTER. 
See Llanfthakoel-Genecr-Glynn. 

LLANFIHANGEL - CIL - FA RGEN, Carmar- 
then, a parish in the hun*'* of Cathenog, union of 
Llandeilo-Fawr, South Wales: 255 miles from 
London (coach road '206), 5 from Llandeilo-FawTi 
11 from Carmarthen.-o»o-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llan- 
deilo-Fawr, thence 5 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 246 miles. -o»o^ 
Money orders issued at Llandcilo : London letters 
deliv**- 2 p.m. : post closes 9i a.m.-o«<»-The living, 
a rectory in the archd'^- of Carmarthen, and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £1. 68. 8d. : prcs. net 
income, £113: patron. Earl Cawdor: prcs. incum- 
bent, W. T. NichoUs, 1838 : cont^iins 10 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 61 : ass*** proi)^- £267 : poor rates in 
1838, £47. lis. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGEL-CWM-DU, Brecon, a par- 
ish in the bun''* and union of Crickhowel, South 
Wales, on a bmnch of the Usk : the parish includes 
the parcels of Blaynoy, Kenol, Kilwych, and Trc- 
tower: 167 miles from London (coach road 160), 
13 from Abergavenny, 10 from Brecon.-o»ei-Gt. 
West. Rail, thi-ough 8tone]iouse and Gloucester to 
Monmouth, thenc« 25 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 158 miles. -o«o- 
Money orders issued at Abergavenny : London 
letters doliv**- 11 a.m. : post closes 1^ p.fh. e> & The 
living (8t. Michael) is valued at £19. 156. 2id. : 
contains 223 houses: pop" in 1841, 1,039: ass'*- 
prop'^- £5,538 : poor rates in 1837, £403. 9s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-FACH (or Llanfihangel- 
Helyoen), Radnor, a parish in the hun^* and 
union of Rhayader, South Wales : 178 miles from 
London (coach road 178), 6 from Rhayader, 8 
from Builth.-3««-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Ross, thence 55 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, 
6rc., 178 miles. ^»*»-Money orders issued at Rha- 
yader : London letters deliv'*- 1^ p.m. : post closes 
11 a.m.-o«»-The living is a perpetual curacy in the 
archd'" of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's : prcs. 
net income, £80 : patron. Vicar of Nantmer : prep, 
incumbent, James John Evans, 1848: contains 19 
houses: pop^^- in 1^41, 102: ass*- prop^- £524: 
poor rates in 1838, £19. 8s. 



LLANFIHANGEL-FECHAN, Brecon, a cha- 
pclry in the parish of Llandefaclog-nich — (which 
see for access, &c.) — Fouth Wales : 172 miles from 
London, 5 from Brecqn, 10 from Builth.-3»<^Money 
orders issued at Brecon: Jjondon letters dcliv** 10 
a.m. : post closes 2 p.m. -oeo- The chapel was 
erected at the expense of one of the family of 
Powel of Castle-Madoc.-o.o-Thc living is a curacy, 
subordinate to the rectory of Llandcfaelog-fach : 
contains 31 houBCs: pop"- in 1841, 200: poor rates 
in 1838, £89. 19. 

LLANFIHANGEL -GENEUR- GLYNN (or 

LANFI H ANGEL- AL-CaSTELL-GwALTER-GlYNN, CAR- 
DIGAN, a parish in the bun*- of Geneur-Glynn. union 
of Abcrystwith, South Wales : the parish includes 
the townships of Caelan-y- Maesmor, Cyfoeth-y- 
Brenin, Cynill-Mawr, Henllys, Scybor-y-Coed, and 
Tyr-y-Mynach : 247 miles from London (coach 
road 216), 5 from Abcrystwith, 11 from Machyn- 
leth.-o«e»-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhamp- 
ton, Shrewsbury, & Oswestry, to Newtown, thence 
40 miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 142 milcs.-o*e- Money ordei-s issued at 
Abcrystwith : London letters deliv*- 5J p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.^3«c^There is a Calvin istic Methodist 
chapel in the village. Many druidical remains 
have been found in the parish.-o«^The living, a 
disch*" vicarage, in the archdJ"- of Cardigan, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £12: prcs. net 
income, 221 : patron, Bishop of St. David's : pres. 
Incumbent, J. Jones, 1844: contains 727 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 3,838: probable pop"- in 1849, 
4,414: flss"*- propJ^- £9,727: poor rates in 1838, 
£1,172. 13s. 

LLANFIHANGEL -m- RUG (or Llanruo), 
Carnarvon, a parish in the bun** of Is-Gorfai, 
union of Carnarvon, North Wales, on the river 
Sciont : 245 miles from London (coach road 244), 
4 from Carnarvon, 7 from Bangor. ^3«=^Nor. West. 
Rail, through Ci'cwe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 7 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c, 
1 45 miles.-o«o-Money orders issued at Carnarvon : 
London letters deliv**- 3i p.m. : post closes 10 a.m. 
-o«»-The living, a rectory in the archd^- and dio- 
cese of Bangor, is valued at £5. 2», 6d. : pres. net 
income, £1GG: patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. 
incumbent, H. B. Williams, 1843: contains 244 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,760: probable pop"- in 
1849, 2,024: ass*- prop^- £1,639: poor rates in 
1838 £229 198 

LLANFIHANGEL-LLETHYRFROED, Car- 
digan, a parish in the bun*- of liar, union of 
Tregaron, South Wnles: the parish includes the 
townships of Lledrod - Isaf, and Lledrod-Uchaf: 
242 miles from London (coach road 219), 8 from 
Abcrystwith, 7 from Tregaron.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton, Bhrewsbury, and Os- 
westry, to Newtown, thence 35 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 137 miles.-o»c»- 
Money orders issued at Abcrystwith : London let- 
ters deliv**- 6 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-o«o One of 
the schools here has a small endowment.-o«o The 
living, a perpetual curacy, in the archdy- of Cardi- 
gan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £4 : 
prcs. net income, £112: patron. Bishop of St. 
David's: pres. incumbent, John Felix, 1828: 
contains 254 houpes: pop"- in 1841, 1,149 : prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 1,321: ass^ prop^- £2,060: 



LLA 



37 



LLA 






poor rates in 1838, £274. 18B.-o«e*Fair, Octo- 
ber 7. 

LLANFIHANGEL-NANT-BBANE (Upper and 
Loweb), Bbecon, a parish in tho hnn^- of Merthjr, 
anion of Brecon, Sonth Wales, on a branch of Uie 
Uftk: 182 miles from London (coach road 177), 

10 from Brecon, 15 from BaiUh.«eM^Gt. West. 
RuL thxoagh Stonehonso and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 42 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 173 miles, --mo- 
Money orders issued at Brecon: London letters 
deliv^ 11 a.m. : post doses 1 p.m.^o*o' There is a 
Gslvinistic Methodist chapel in the vilIage.-«Me- 
The living (St Michael) is a perpetual curacy, in 
the archd''' of Brecon and diocese of St. David's ; 
not in charge: pres. net income, £G6: patrons. 
Coheirs of the late W. Jeffreys, Esq. : pres. incum- 
bent, Thomas Price, 1817: contains 102 houses: 
pop*- in 1841, 495; ass*- prop^- £1,786 : poor rates 
in 1838, £202. 58. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGELNANT-MELLAN, Radkob, 
a parish within the liberties of the borough of New 
Kadnor, union of Kington, South Wales: the 
parish includes the township of Trewom : 172 
miles from London (coach road 162), 4 from New 
Badnor, 11 from Presteign.<-««»Gt. West. Sail, 
through Stonehouso and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 40 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 163 milcs.-«>K>-Money orders 
issued at Kington : London letters dcliv^- 10| a.m. : 
post closes 1 p.m. q ^ e The parochial charities 
produce about £8 per annum. -o«<»The living, a 
disch*^ vicarage in the archd'- of Brocon, and dio- 
cese of St. David's, is valued at £4. ISs. 4d. : proa, 
net income, £142 : patron. Lord Chancellor: pres. 
incumbent, W. Williams, 1831 : contains 73 
houses: pop"* in 1841,419: ass^ prop^* £2,409 : 
poor rates in 1838, £94. 

LLANFIHANGEL-FENBEDW, Fembrokb, a 
parish in the hun^ of Kilgarran, union of Cardigan, 
&Nith Wales : 264 miles from London (coach road 
234), 4 from Newcastle, 4 irom Cardigan.-oM»-Gt. 
West BaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 1 55 
milea.-eM>* Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv^' 7pm.: post closes 9 p.m. 
-«»e.-Tho living, a disch*^- rectory in the archd^- of 
Cardigan, and diocese of St David's, is valued at 
£6: pres. net income, £89: patron, Lord Chan- 
cellor : pres. incumbent, G. Devoneld, 1828 : con- 
tains 70 houses: pop"- in 1841, 343: ass**' prop^"- 
£1,340 : poor rates in 1838, £181. 16s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-KHOSICORN, CiUUCAirrHEii, 
a parish in the hun**' of Cathinog, union of Lam- 
peter, South Wales: j261 miles from London 
(coach road 205), 15 from Carmarthen, 10 from 
Lampeter. a»o Gt. West. Rail through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Landeilo-Fawr, thence 

11 miles : from Derby, through Birminp^Vam, 
Gloucester, &c., 252 mlles.-«3*o-Monoy orders is- 
saed at Carmarthen: London letters deliv^ 6} 
p.m.: post closes 9 p.m.-eM^The living is a curacy 
snboidinate to the vicarage of Llanllwni : contaius 

prop''- 



ass 



d. 



132 houses: pop^ in 1841, 709: 
£1,722 : poor rates in 1838, £280. 

LLAKFIHANGEL-RHYDITHON, Radnor, a 
pariah in the bun*'- of Kevenllcece, union of 



Knighton, South Wales, east of the Ithen: 173 
miles from Loudon (coach road 168), 12 from 
Rhayader, 9 from New Radnor.-o«c:^Gt. West. 
Rail, through Oxford to Worcester, thence 55 
miles: from Dorby, through Birmingham, Wor- 
cester, &c., 126 miles.*e«o. Money orders issued at 
Rhayader: London letters deliv^ 3 p.m.: post 
doses 9^ a.m.^3«»'The living is a perpetual cu- 
racy, annexed to that of Llanddewy-ystradenny : 
contains 54 houses: pop"* in 1841, 337: ass*** 
propy- £1,765: poor rates in 1838, £222. 15s. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGEL-TAL-Y-LLYNN, Brkcon, 
a parish in the hun^* of Talgarth, union of Brecon, 
South Wales: 160 miles from London (coach 
road 165), 5 from Brecon, 12 from CrickhoweU. 
'OMs-Gt. West. lUil. through Stonehouse and 
Gloucester to Monmouth, &c., thence 28 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
141 miles.-ovo Money orders issued at Brecon : 
London letters deliv*** 10 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m. 
-«s««»-The living, a disch**- rectory, in the arohd^* of 
Brecon, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £4; 
12s. 3id.: pros, not income, £158: patron, Rev. 
Hugh Bold: pros, incumbent, Hugh Bold, 1822: 
contains 33 houses: pop^* in 1841, 151: ass^- 
propy- £629: poor rates in 1838, £75. 17s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-TRER-BEIRDD, Ahglb- 
SET, a parish in the hun^ of Twrcelyn, union of 
Anglesey, North VV^ales: 251 miles from London 
(coach road 263), 3 from Llanerch-y-Med, 12 
from Beaumaris. -oM»- Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crowe, Chester, and Bangor, to Gaerwen station, 
thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Crowe, &c., 
151 miles. «o«c>. Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv^- 9^ a.ro. : post closes 2^ p.m. 
e> 6 ' The village originally received its peculiar 
title from having been a bardic settlement or sta- 
tion of the Druids. On Bodafon hill, close by, is 
** the shapely cromlech " mentioned by Rowlands 
as thrown down and lying upon throe supporters 
in the lands of Blockey. The table-stone measuros 
ten feet in length by eight in broad th, and its com- 
mon name among the natives is y-maen Llwydd. 
Not far distant, at a place called Barras, thero is 
a smaller one in ruins. Some trifling charities 
belong to the pari8h.'-«>«>-The living is a curacy, 
subordinate to the rectory of Llandyfrydog : con- 
tains 69 houses: pop"' in 1841, 373: ass^* prop^- 
£954 : poor rates in 1838, £166. 6s. 

LLANFYHANGEL-TYNSYLWY,AKoi.r.8EY,a 
parish in the hnn^ of Tyndaethwy, union of Ban- 
gor and Beaumaris, North Wales : 24G miles from 
London (coach road 255), 4 from Beaumaris, 14 
from Llancroh-y-med.^o«e- Nor. West. Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester, to Bangor, thence 8 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 146 miles, o o 
Money orders issued at Beaumaris : London letters 
deliv*^ 9 a.m. : post closes 4^ p.m.-«Mei>Thero aro 
the romains here of an ancient British fort, and 
one of those relics commonly called Arthur's Round 
Table.-">K>>The living is a curacy, subordinate to 
that of Llangoed: contains 10 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 63: as8<>* prop3^- £332 : poor rates in 1838, 
£41. 8s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-UWCHGWILI, Carmar- 
then, a denomination in the hun*^- of Elvet, South 
Wales: 228 miles from Liondon, 7 from Carmarthen, 



LLA 



38 



LLA 



14 from Newcaatle. « •& Money orders issued at 
CAnnarthen : London letters deliv^- 4) p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-o*o^Thc living is a perpetual curacy in 
the archd^* of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. 
David*B : pres. net income, £75 : patron, Vicar of 
Abergwilly: pres. incumbent, Enoch I^gh, 1846. 

LLANFin ANGEL- Y-BONTFAEN, (or Llan- 
innANOLs), Glamorgan, a parish in the hun'* of 
Ogmore, locally in that of Oowbridge, union of 
Bridgend and Cowbridge, South )Vales : 196 miles 
from London (coach road 175), 2 from Cowbridge, 
7 from Bridgend. -o«o-Gt. West. Rail, through 
6tonebouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Bridgend, 
thence 7 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &o., 187 mileB.-eM>-Money orders 
issued at Cowbridge: London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. : post closes 1 p.m. and 4} p.m. «•» 
There is an old seat here belonging to the Earl of 
Dunraven, but occupied, for the last half century, 
only by farmers ; there is a very fine plantation of 
yews in the grounds. -ove^Tbo living (St. Michael) 
is a rectory in the diocese of Llandaff : pres. net in- 
come, £142 : patron, Earl of Dunraven : pres. in- 
cumbent, G. A. Biedermann, 1818: contains 5 
houses: pop*^ la 1841, 50: ass'- prop^* £611: po<Mr 
rates in 1838, £58. 10s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-y-CKOYDDIN, ISAP and 
UCHAF, Cardigan, a parish in the upper division 
of the hun^ of liar, union of Aberystwith, South 
Wales : 247 miles from London (coach road 205), 
7 from Aberystwith, 10 from Tregaron.-*>»ea-Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton, Shrewsbury, 
and Oswestry, to Newtown, thence 40 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafi'ord and Shrewsbury, &c., 142 
raile8.-<o*<»Money orders issued at Aberystwith: 
London letters deliv^ 6 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-^•o^There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. 
•<«e>>The living, a disoh*^ vicarage in the arohd'* 
of Cardigan and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£8 : pres. net income, £126 : patron, Bishop of St. 
David's : pres. incumbent, Lewis Evans : contains 
354 houses : pop*"- in 1841 , 2,102 : probable pop" in 
1849, 2,417: ass^- prop)"- £5,030: poor rates in 
1838, £539. 4s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-YN-HOWYN, Anolbset, a 
chapelry in the parish of Rhte^Colyn — (which see 
for access, &c.). North Wales: 269 miles from 
London, 6 from Holyhead, 10 from Langefni.-oM». 
Money ordera issued at Holyhead : London letters 
dcliv^' 9 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o«>43ome trifling 
charities belong to the chapelry. -e^i-The living is a 
curacy subordinate to the rectory of Rhds-Colyn : 
contains 33 houses : pop^ in 1841, 200 : ass'- props'- 
£446: poor rates in 1838, £85. 3s. 

LLANFIH ANGEL- YNYGWAELOD. See St. 

MiCHAELSTONE-LE-PlT. 

LLANFIHANGEL-Y-PENNANT, Carnarvon, 
a parish in the hun^ of Evionydd, union of Festi- 
niog. North Wales : 258 miles from London (coach 
road 232), 5 from Tremadoc, 12 from Carnarvon. 
^^•exNor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thence 20 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 158 miles.-e«>-Money orders issued at 
Carnarvon: London letters deliv^* 7 p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-*3*=-The living (St. Michael) is a rec- 
tory in the archd'^* and diocese of Bangor : pres. net 
income, £127 : patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. in- 
cumbent, John Jones, 1827: contains 95 houses: 



pop"- in 1841, 680? ass^^ prop^- £2,586: poor rates 
in 1838, £614. 6s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANFIHANGEL-Y8CBIFI0G, Angijmet, a 
parish in the hun^ of Menai, union of Bangor and 
Beaumaris, North Wales, on the river Cefhi : 245 
miles from London (coaoh road 258), 7 from Ban- 
gor, 7 from Newborough.-««o-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 7 
miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 145 miles. 
-e»e>Money orders issued at Bangor : London let- 
ters deHv^' 9 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-«9M>-The cha- 
rities produce about £9 a year.-^Mo^The living is a 
perpetual curacy, with that of Llanfinnan, in the 
archd''* and diocese of Bangor : pres. net income, 
£120: patron. Dean of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
R. Parry Jones, 1849 : contains 133 houses: pop"- 
in 1841, 947: a8S<>- props'- £1,161: poor rates in 
1837 £214. 15s. 

LLANFIHANGEL-YSTRAD (Lower and Ur^ 
per), Cardioan, a parish in the hun^- of Moyddyn, 
union of Aberayon, South Wales, on the western 
bank of the Aeron : 270 miles fVom London (coach 
road 217), 6 f^m Lampeter, 10 from Tregaron. 
-«M>^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 20 
miles } from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 261 miles.-eM>-Money orders is- 
sued at Lampeter : London letters deliv^* 5} p.m. : 
post closes 9 p.m. -cMo- There is an Independent 
chapel here. a* p The living, a disch^ vicarage 
in the arehd'- of Cardigan and diocese of St. David^s, 
is valued at £4. 18s. l}d : pres. net income, £96 : 
patron. Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, 
David Griffiths, 1838 : contains 261 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 1,225: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,409: 
BAB^' propr- £3,660 : poor rates in 1838, £468. Is. 
Tithes commuted in 1 839. 

LLANFIH ANGEL -Y-TRAETH AN, Mbriot 
NETH, a parish in the bun'* of Ardudwy, union of 
Festiniog, North Wales : 227 miles from London 
(coaoh road 229), 7 flrom Tanybwleb, 3 from Har- 
lcoh.-o«»-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton 
and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 60 miles: 
from Derby, through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 
142 miles. -oMt'Monev ordera issued at Carnarvon : 
London letters deliv^ 9^ p.m.: post closes 8 p.m. 
w » There are two Calvinistic Methodist chapcia 
here.'-«>«>-The living, a perpetual curacy , with that 
of Llandecwyn, in the arehd'* of Merioneth and 
diocese of Bangor, is valued at £6. 14s. 9^ : pres. 
net income, £113: patron. Treasurer of Bangor 
Cathedral: pres. incumbent, John Pughe, 1826: 
contains 188 houses : pop*** in 1841 , 1,339 : probable 
pop^ in 1849, 1,562: ass* prop^- £2,079: poor 
rates m 1838, £435. 9s.-o«>Plas.yn-Ptenthyn is 
the seat of Samuel Holland, Esq., a magistrate for 
the county. 

LLANFILO, (or LLANVTLiiO), Brecon, a parish 
in the httn*- of Pen-Kelly, union of Brecon, South 
Wales, on a branch of the Wye: 160 miles from 
London (coach road 167), 6 from Brecon, 11 from 
Hay.-cw«^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and 
Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 28 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 
151 miles.-oM>-Money orders issued at Brecon: 
London lettere deliv*^ 10 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m. 
-o«o-The living (St. Milburg), a rectory, with the cu- 
racy of Llandevailogtref-y-graig, in the arohd^^* of 



Bncon ud ^ooeM of 8ti DaTid's, is valaad at 
£6. 14s. 9id. : prcs. net inocmo, £324 : patroO) T. 
Watkina, faq.: presw incwiib^t, Wm. Bowcott, 
1844: oontaina 78 kousea: pop"- in 1841, 300: 
lai^ propy- £1,655: poorimteain 1838, £174. 128. 

LLANFOIST, Moiooittb, a parUh in die upper 
diTiflion of the hnn'- of Alwrgavenny, tinion of 
Abeqi^Tenny, bounded on tlie north and eaat by 
the Uak, and oroaaed by tbe Brecon Canal : 158 
miJea from London (eoacb rood 148), 2 mtiea from 
Abergavenny, 7 £n>m CriokhoweU.-««e^Gi. Weat 
Bait through 8t<Mieho«0e aoid Qlouceater to Mon- 
monthf thenee 16 liiUea: froni Darby, through 
BirmtnghAin and Glouceater, &c., 149 milea.'OMa- 
Money osders iwued at Abergavenny: London 
lettera deliv^ 8 ;a.Bi. : poat clofies 4} p.in.-««^The 
firing Is in the arcfadf* aAddiooeta of liandaff : prea. 
net income, £174 : patron> Earl of Abergavenny : 
eontaina 2,490 acrea: 169 houses: poplin 1841, 
U500: probable p<9'- in 1849, 1,725: asa'* ptop^- 
£1,733 : poor ratea in 1838, £79. 8fl. 

LLANFKOTHEN, Mbrioketb, a parish in the 
han'- of Ardudwy, union of Festiniog, North Wales : 
222 miles from Loudon (coaeh roud 220), 10 from 
Beddgelert, 9 from Harle6h.^o«p-Nor. Weat. RaiL 
through Wolverhampton aad Shrewsbury to Os- 
westry, tlienoe 65 miles: from Derby, through 
Stafford and Shrewsbury, Jcc., 147 mile8.-a««*Mo- 
aey oiders issued at Carnarvon: London letters 
deUv^ 7 pju* : poat closes 8 pwm.-«««^There is a 
Cslvinistic Methodist chapel hen.-««e*The living 
{St Bfuthen), a discharged rectory in the arohd'* 
of Merioneth and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£6. 16b. : pros, net income, £115: patrou, Bishop of 
Bangor: contains 128 houses: pop^- in 1841, 853: 
asa<' piop]'- £1,951 : poor rmtes in 1838, £389. 3s. 

LLAKFRYNACBL See Llamfbulah. 

LLANFUOAIL (or LLiLHFXOAiL), ANULasET, a 
pariah in the hun'- of Tal-y^BoUon, union of An- 
glesey, North Wjdea: 270 miles from London 
(coaeh road 270), 7 from H<dyhead, 7 from Llan- 
ereh-y-med.-<oM»-Nor. West. RaiL through Crewe 
and Cheater to Hdyhead, thcmce 7 miks: from 
Derby, through Crewe, Ac, 170 miles.-o«»>Money 
orders issued at Holyhead: London ietters deUv"- 
9| a.ni.: po^ doses 3^ p.ni.-««»-There ii a Cal- 
vinistie Methodist chapel bera.-««»-The living is a 
cQiaey, subordinate to the rectory of IJanfacfeth; 
eontsina 26 houses: pop"- in 1841, 164: asa^ 
propT- £4 26: p oor ratea in 1838, £124. Us. 

LLANFWROO, Amolbibv, a parish in the 
hun^ of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, North 
Wsles: 272 miles from London, 13 from Lhm* 
geffiu. o<e (For asossp and postal arrangements, 
see above.) q«e . S ome trifling charities belong to 
the parish. There is a Galvinistic Methodist 
chapel liere.«««»-The living (St Mwrog) is a curacy, 
subordiuate to the rectoiy of Llanfaethie : contains 
46 honsea: pop"- in 1841, 267: ass"^ prop^* 
£1,053: poor rates in 1838, £184. 13b. 

LLANFWROO, Dbhbioh, a parish in the hun^, 
botuugh, and union of Ruthin, North Wales, on 
the river Owyd : 202 miles from London (coach 
road 196), 8 from Denbigh. -o^e- Nor. West. 
RalL through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury 
to Wrexham Segia, thence 15 milea : from Derby, 
thiough Staffi)^ and Shrewsbury, &o., 117 
miles.'^wi-Money orders issued at Ruthin: Lon- 



don ietters deliv*** 9^ a.m. : post closes 3} p.m. 
-•«o*'An hospital for ten poor persons was founded 
and endowed here in 1808 by Lady Jane Bagot. 
The other charities produce about £15 a year.-oM>* 
The living (St. Mwrog), a rectory in the diocese 
of Bangor, is valued at £16. 138. 4d. : pros, net 
income, £429: patron, Biphop of Bangor: pros, 
incumbent, R. Newcoma, 1804: contains 367 
houses: pop^- in 1841, 1,554: probable pop"* in 
1849, same : ass^ prop^> £2,356 : poor rates in 
183$, £504.-»M>.The gentlemen's seats in the 
parish are, Pool Park, the residence of Lord Bagot ; 
Woodlands, of Hugh Jones, £6q. ; and Plasnewydd, 
of Joseph Peers, Esq. 

LLANFYLLIN, Moktooscbry, a parish, borough, 
and market town, in the hun** and union of Llan- 
fyUin, North Wales: 199 miles from iK>ndon 
(coach road 179), 12 from OBwestiy.^a^c^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury |o Oswestry, thence 12 miles: from Deri)y) 
through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 104 miles. 
«mm M oney orders issued at Oswestry: London 
letters deliv*^ lOj aon. : post closes 2 'p.m.-o«o- 
The town, which is situated on the south bank; of 
the river Cam, ts neat and agreeable in its appear- 
ance; the principal street, which runs east and 
west, being crossed by t&e Abd-breok, which falls 
into the Cam. The town-hall, a neat brick build- 
ing, with a covered area for a market andomeath) 
was built by the proceeds of a sale of die common 
lands, disposed of for the purpose, by act of parlia- 
ment. Tlie church is a brick building, altogether 
destitute of architectund beauty. The Wesleyan 
and Calvinistic Methodists^ the Baptists and the 
Independents, have places of worship here. Bene* 
factions have been left for the support of schools, 
by lilr. Thomas, Mrs. Yaughan, and Lady Strange- 
ways, for the purpose of educating the poor. 
LUmfyllin was incorporated by Llewelyn-ap- 
Gryffydd, in the time of Edward II. ; and a char- 
ter was granted to it by Charles II., whose deed 
appears to have directed and consolidated the go- 
verning power, but the borough is not included in 
any of the schedules of the municipal reform act. 
It joins with Montgoaiery in sending a represen- 
tative to parliament, and is one of the polling- 
places for the county^ A workhouse has been 
erected here, which is capable of accommodating 
250 inmates. The LlanfylUn poor-law union com- 
prises 23 parishes, with a population of about 
kO,000 perBonB.-»^The living (St. Myllm), a 
rectory in the arohdJ^* and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £10. 13s. 6id.: pros, net income, x485: 
patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : prea incumbent, D» 
Hughes, 1813: contains 376 houses: pop*^- in 
1841, 1,955: probable pop»* in 1849, 2,248: ass**- 
piop7- £5,296 : poor rates in 1838, £676. 19b.-««» 
Fairs: Wednesday before £a0ter, May 24, June 
28, Thursday before August 15, December 10. 

LLANFYNNYD, CABUAirrHEN, a parish in tbe 
bun*'- of Cathiuog, union of Llandeilo-Fawr, South 
Wales, east of the river Cothte : 257 miles from 
London (coach road 209), 7 from Llandeilo-Fawr, 
11 from Carmarthen. «o«>-Gt. West. RaiL through 
Stonehonse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llan- 
deilo-Fawr, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Qlouceater, &c., 248 miles, ot c. 
Money orders issued at Llandeilo: London letters 



J 



LLA 



40 



LLA 



deliv^ 2} p.m.: post closes 9 a.m. «■ & One of the 
schools here has been endowed, by the Rey. 
D. Jones, with £15 a year. -««o- The living 
(St. Egwad), a disch**' vicarage in the archd'* of 
Carmarthen and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £6. 13b. 4d. ; pres. net income, £150: patron, 
Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, William 
Harris, 1838: contains 277 houses : pop*^* in 1841, 
1,358 : probable pop*- in 1849, 1,561 : ass*- prop^- 
£4,878: poor rates in 1838, £710. 138. Tithes 
commuted in 1839. o *e i Fairs: July 5, September 
28, and November 19. 

LLANGADFAN, Mohtgobibst, a parish in the 
bun**' of Mathrafel, union of LJanfyllin, North 
Wales, on the river Banwy : 207 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 190), 7 from Llanfair, 10 from 
Llanfyllin.-o.o- Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton, Shrewsbury, and Oswestry, to Welsh- 
pool, thence 15 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford and Shrewsbury, &c., 122 miles. -o«e^Money 
orders issued at Welshpool : London letters deliv^- 
1 p.m.: post closes at noon.-o«o^£l50 was given 
by the St. Asaph Diocesan Society for the building 
of a chapel of ease there. The parochial charities 
produce about £7 per annum.-e«e>-The living (St. 
Cadvan), a rectory in the diocese and archd^* of 
St. Asaph, is valued at £9. 5s. : pres. net income, 
£299 : patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incum- 
bent, 6. Howell, 1813: contains 195 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1,070: ass*- piop^- £2,864: poor 
rates in 1838, £313. 9s. 

LLANGADOCK, Carmarthen, a parish and 
market town in the hun*^* of Perfedd, union of 
Llandovery, South Wales, on the river Tcifi : the 
parish includes the hamlets of Above-Sawddo, 
Duifryn-Cydrich, and Gwinfe : 258 miles from 
London (coach road 195), 8 from Llandeilo-Fawr. 
"ovo^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 8 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 249 miles. -«»o- Money ordors 
issued here : London letters deliv'* at noon : post 
closes 12^ p.m.-eM^The town is governed by a 
portreeve and eight burgesses. Coorts-baron are 
held here monthly, and the lord of the manor 
holds a court-lcet every six monthB.-e*e>The living 
(St. Cadog), a vicarage, with the curacy of Llan- 
thrisaint, in the archd''* of Carmarthen and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £9 : pres. net income, 
£267 : patron. Bishop of St. David's : pres. incum> 
bent, Thomas Davies, 1836 : contains 477 houses : 
pop»- in 1841, 2,604: probable pop»- in 1849, 
2,994: ass*- prop^- £6,767: poor rates in 1838, 
£1,107.<«3«» Fairs: March 12, horses; Ascension- 
day, July 9, first Thursday in September, cattle, 
borses, sheep; December 11, cattle.-oM»-GlauBevin 
Arms Inn. 

LLANGAFFO, Anglesey, a parish in the bun** 
of ^enai, union of Carnarvon, North Wales, east 
o^ the river Cefoi : 247 miles from London (coach 
road 254), 5 from Carnarvon, 3 from Newborougli. 
-o«c»-Nor. West. Rail, through CVowe, Chester, and 
Bangor, to Gaerwen station, thence 2 miles : from 
i'erby, through Crewe, &c., 147 miles. -o^c^Money 
orders issued at Carnarvon : London letters deliv** 
4 p.m.: post closes 9 J a.m.-o»«>-The living (St. 
Cafio) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of 
Llangeinwen: contains 20 houses: pop"- in 1841, 



139 : ass"!- prop^* £643: poor rates in 1838, £112. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGAIN, Carmarthen, a parish in the hon^ 
of Derllys, union of Carmarthen, South Wales, on 
the western bank of the Towy : 234 miles from 
London (coach road 222), 4 from Carmarthen, 7 
from Llaughame. -oMi- Gt West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 20 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c., 225 mile8.-<»«>-Money 
orders issued at Carmarthen : London letters deliv*^ 
3^ p.m.: post doses 9 p.m.-«K>.The living (St. 
Synin) is a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of Car- 
marthen and diocese of St. David's : pres. net in- 
come, £85 : patron, F. Biudworth, Esq. : pres. 
incumbent, John Thomas, 1816: contains 71 
houses: pop"- in 1841,403: ass^* prop^* £1,530: 
poor rates in 1838, £253. 19s. 

LLANGAMMARCH, Bsecon, a parish in the 
hun^' and union of Builth, South Wales, on a 
branch of the Wye : the parish includes the ham- 
lets of Pen-Buait and Treflis: 182 miles from 
London (coach road 182), 9 from Builth, 13 from 
Rhayoder.-oM^-Gk. West. Rail, through Stonehouso 
and Gloucester to Ross, thence 50 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &o., 
173 milcs.-<=«c:^Moiiey orders issued at Builth : 
London letters deliv^ 4j p.m. : post closes 5 p.m. 
-o.»In 1782, Mrs. Margaret Jones left £1,000 in 
the 3 per cent, consols for charitable purposes.-<Mo- 
The living (St. Cammarch), a disoh**- vicarage, 
with the curacies of Llanurtid and Llandewi- 
Abergwessin, in the archd''* of Brecon and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £8. 148. 5d. : pres. net 
income, £209 : patron, Bishop of St. David's : 
pres. incumbent, W. Jenkins, 1833: contacts 129 
houses: pop°-in 1841, 1,062: ass'- prop^* £3,163: 
poor rates in 1838, £325. 3s. 

LLANGAN, Carmakthbn, a parish in the hun^ 
of Derllys, in the above county, and in that of 
Dungleddy, union of Narbeth, county of Pem- 
broke: 249 miles from London (coach road 233), 
7 from Narbeth, 15 from Carmarthen. -o*o>GL 
West Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 35 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 
240 miles.-o«c^Money orders issued at Narbeth : 
London letters deliv^ 10 p.m. : post closes 7) 
p.m.'OAc^The living (St. Canna), a disch*^ vicarage 
in the archd''' of Carmarthen and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3 : pres. net income, £86 : 
patron. Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, John 
Evans, 1831: contains 135 houses: pop*^- in 1841, 
640: ass'* prop^^- £2,514: poor rates in 1838, 
£239. £s, 

LLANGANNA, Glakoroan, a parish in the 
hun^ of Ogmore, union of Bridgend and Cowbridge, 
South Wales : 196 miles from Loudon (coach road 
176), 4 from Cowbridge, 7 from Bridgend.-oM9>Gt. 
West. Riiil. through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Clicpstow, to Bridgend, thence 7 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 187 
miles. c»«o Money orders issued at Cowbridge : 
London letters dcliv'* 11} a.m. : post closes 12} 
p.m.^9«=>-The parochial charities produce about £3. 
15s. per annum. -<>M» The living (St. Conna), a 
disch*^- rectory in the archd^* and diocese of Llan- 
daff, is valued at £12. 16s. 0}d. : pres. net income, 




£244 : patron, Earl of Clarendon and Earl Dnn- 
laren: prea. incumbent, R. Prichard, 1821: con- 
tains 49 hoiuies: pop"- in 1841, 238: ass*- prop^- 
£1,312 : poor rates in 1838, £86. ds. 

LLANGANTEN, Brecon, a parisli in tbe lian'i- 
and onion of Bnilth, South Wales : 182 miles from 
London (coach road 176), 3 from Builth, 16 from 
Brecknock. -oMi-Gt. West Rail, throngh Stone- 
liouse and Gloucester to Ross, thence 50 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
173 miles. -a*o- Money orders issued at Builth : 
London letters deiiv'- 3 p.m. : post closes 6^ p.m. 
-o«>-The parochial charities produce about £3. lOs. 
per annum. o»c . The living (St. Catherine or St. 
Canten), a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of Bre- 
eon, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £5 : 
pres. net income, £64: patron, Bishop of St. 
David's : pres. incumbent, E. Holcombe : contains 
33 houses: pop"- in 1841,177: ass*- prop^- £1,040: 
poor rates in 1837, £63. 80. 

LLANGAR, Mbuoksth, a parish in the hun^ 
of Edemion, union of Corwen, North Wales, on the 
rirer Dee: 194 miles from London (coach road 
195), 1 from Corwen, 12 from Ruthin.^*o.Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Llangollen station, thence 15 miles: from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 109 
miles. -cMo-MoDey orders issued at Corwen: Lon- 
don letters deliv'- 9} a.m. : post closes 2} p.m. 
-«M>-The liviug (All Saints), a disch^- rectory in 
the archd^' and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at 
£5. 7s. lid.: pres. net income, £2(X): patron. 
Bishop of St Asaph : pres. incumbent, John Daw- 
son, 1838: contains 42 houses: pop°- in 1841, 
250: ass^ prop}"- £1,829: poor rates in 1838, 
£145. 158. 

LLANGARRAN, Hebeford, a parish in the 
lower division of the hun^ of Wormelow, union of 
Boss, on a branch of the Wye : 137 miles from 
London (coach road 126), 5 from Ross, 6 from 
Monmouth. -eM>- Gt. West. 1^1. through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Ross, thence 5 miles: 
firom Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
128 mile8.'o«».Money orders issued at Ross : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 8) a.m. : post closes 6 p.m.-e^*- 
Thexe aie some small charities amounting to £2. 
Ss. per annum, belonging to the parish, which also 
ptrticipates in Mrs. F. Scudamore's benefaction to 
this anid two other parishes, for the apprenticing 
of children.-«>Ms-The living is a curacy, subordinate 
to the vicarage of Lugwardine: contains 5,890 
acres: 209 houses: pop*^- in 1841, 1,175: probable 
pop»- in 1849, 1,351: ass**- prop^- £6,704: poor 
rates in 1838, £432. 158. 

LLANGASTY-TALYLLYN, Brecon, a parish 
in the hun*** of Pen-Kelly, union of Brecon, South 
Waka, on the lake of Llangorse: 167 miles from 
London (coach road 168), 6 from Brecon, 12 from 
Orickhowell.-e«»>Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 25 
auks: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &C., 158 mile8.-e«»-Money orders issued at 
Brecon: London letters deliv*** 10 a.m.: post 
closes 2 p.m.-«>«»-The living (St. Gasty), a rectory 
in the arehd^* of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £4. 18s. 9d. : pres. net income, £207 : 
patron, Rev. R. Davies: pres. incumbent, R. P. 
Davies, 1833: conUins 31 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 
roL. in. 



164: ass^propy- £1,726: poor rates in 1838, £63. 
19s. 

LLANGATHEN, Caruartben, a parish in the 
huu^ of Cathinog, union of Llandeilo-Fawr, on the 
river Towy : 253 miles from London (coach road 
204), 3 from Llandeilo-Fawr, 13 from Carmarthen. 
■o««>Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 
3 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &C., 244 miles.^o*oMoney orders issued at 
Llandeilo-Fawr : London letters deliv*** 1 p.m. : 
post closes 10 a.m.-oM>-The living (St. Cathan), a 
vicarage in the arohd'* of Carmarthen, and diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £6. 13s. 4d. : pres. net 
income, £93 : patron, Bishop of Chester : pres. in- 
cumbent, William Jones, 1847 : contains 197 
houses: pop*^ in 1841, 1,108: probable pop"* in 
1849, 1,274: ass*- prop^- £5,096: poor rates in 
1838, £591. Tithes commuted in 1839.-o.<^Fair, 
April 16. 

LLANGATTOCE, Monmouth, a parish in the 
lower division of the hun** of Usk, union of New- 
port : the parish includes the town of Caerleon. 
-o«c..(For access, &c,, see CAERLEON.)-«M»*Monev 
ordera issued at Newport : London letters deliv^- 
9 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o««>-The living is a vi- 
carage in the diocese of Llandaff : pres. net income, 
£296: patron. Dean and Chapter of Llandaff: 
pres. incumbent, D. Jones, 1831 : contains 2,750 
acres: 277 houses: pop°-in 1841, 1,440: probable 
pop"- in 1849, 1,656: ass^ prop^* £5,148: poor 
rates in 1838, £307. 4s. 

LLANGATTOCK-LLINGOED, Moumouth, a 
parish in the lower division of the hun*^- and union 
of Abergavenny : 154 miles from London (coach 
road 141),' 6 from Abergavenny, 12 from Mon- 
mouth.-ooo.Gt. West. Kail, through Stonehouse and 
Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 12 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 145 
mile8.«o«cwMoney orders issued at Abergavenny : 
London letters deliv*** 9 a.m. : post closes 3} p.m. 
-oMi-The charities produce about £5. 10s. per an- 
num.-cM^-^he living, a disoh*- vicarage in the 
archd''* and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £5. 68. 
5}d. : pres. net income, £172 : patron Lord Chan- 
cellor: pres. incumbent, Hon. H. Rodney, 1827: 
contains 1,730 acres: 43 bodies: pop"- in 1841, 
203 : ass^ prop^- £1,1 55 : poor rates in 1838, £146. 
10s. 

LLANGATTOCE, near USK, Monmouth, a 
parish in the upper division of the bun'* and union 
of Abergavenny, on the river Usk : 155 miles from 
London (coach road 142), 8 from Usk, 13 from 
Monmouth.-owa-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 13 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
146 miles.-oM>>Motfey orders issued at Usk : Lon- 
don letters deliv'* 10 a.m. : post closes 2} p.m.<<»c>- 
The charities paoduce about £4 a year.-e«o^The 
living (St Cadoc), a rectory in the archd^- and 
diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £11. 78. Sjd. : 
pres. net income, £272 : patron, Earl of Aberga- 
venny: pres. incumbent, William Powell, 1810: 
contains 1,260 acres: 32 houses: pop" in 1841, 
171 : ass**- prop^- £2,161 : poor rates in 1838, £156. 
12s. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANGATTOCK-VIBON-AVEL, Monmouth, 

a palish in the lower division of the hun*^- of Sken- 

o 



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42 



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fireth, union of Monmoath : 147 miles from London 
(coach road 134), 5 from Monmouth, 11 from 
Ahergavenny.>««»^€^ West. Bail, though Stone- 
hooflo and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 5 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c^ 
138 miles.'OMa^Money orders issued at Monmouth : 
London letters deliy"- 8^ a.m. : post closes 5^ p.m. 
-<M<»»Lime is formed in great abundance in the par- 
ish. The country around is remarkable for its pic- 
turesque beauty, and the views of the Welsh moun- 
tains on the one side, and the richly-wooded hills Of 
the Forest of Deane on the other, are very fine. The 
hamlet of Newcastle (part of the parish of Llan- 
gattock) presents the remains of an ancient castle, 
of which it was once the site, and also possesses 
an oak tree, celebrated for its peculiar appearance, 
and known by the name of the " Newcastle Oak," 
said to hare been planted by Owen Glendower. 
-«w>-The living, a Tiearage, with the perpetual 
curacies of Llanvenair and St Maughan's, in the 
arched- aikd diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £6. 
188. ll^d. : pros, net income, £365: patron, John 
£. W. Bolls, Esq. : pres. incumbent, £dward Perry, 
1844 : contains 3,650 acres : 97 houses : pop'- in 
1841* 503: ass*^- prop)"- £3,074: poor rates in 
1838, £224. 15s.^»«e^The Hendie is the seat of 
John Etherington Welch Rolls, Esq., who was 
high sheriff in 1842, and is a magistrate and 
deputy-lieutenant of the county. 

LLANGATTBOG (or LLA^NaArrocK) , Bbecos, 
a parish in the hun^ and union of Crickhowell, 
South Wales: the parish includes the parcels of 
Penallt, Frisk, and Killey: 165 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 158)^ 1 from Crickhowell, 9 from 
Abergavenny.-oae^t. West. Bail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Monmouth, ^ence 23 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 156 miles.-eMi-Money orders issued at 
Crickhowell : London letters deliv^ 7} a.m. : post 
closes 4^ p.m.-aM>-The living (St Gatrog or Cadoc), 
a rectory, with the curacies of Llanelly and Llan- 
genney, in the archd''* of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £31. 3s. 9d. : pres. net 
income, £1,123: patron, Duke of Beaufort: pres. 
incumbent, Lord W. G. H. Somerset, 1814 : con- 
tains 516 houses: pop*** in 1841, 4,334 : probable 
pop*"' in 1849, 4,984: ass''- prop^^- £2,950 : poor 
rates in 1838, £343. 5s. 

LLANGEDWIN, Dbnbiohshirb, a parish in the 
hun*^ of Churk, union of Lknfyllin, North Wales, 
on the river Tanat: 184 miles from London (coach 
road 187), 4) from Llanfyllin, 10 from Oswestry. 
-««»-Nor. West Bail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 10 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &o., 99 miles. 
-«Me»Money orders issued at Oswestry: London 
letters deliy^ 10 a.m. : post^doses 2^ p.m.-o»o- 
The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^* 
and diocese of St. Asaph : pres. act income, £100 : 
patron. Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart., M.P. : pres. in- 
cumbent, David Boberts, 1843 : contains 58 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 332: ass*"- prop^- £1,793: poor 
rates in 1837, £100. Tithes commuted in 1839 
o»o In this parish is the ancient mansion of Llan- 
gedwin Hall, the residence of Sir Watkin W. 
Wynn, Bart., M.F. for the county, who has a very 
large property in this neighbourhood, both in the 
counties of Montgomery and Denbigh. — Bryny- 



gwalian is also a pretty residence in this parish, 
belonging to the Maurice £Eunily, occupied by Jo- 
seph Gill, Esq. 

LLANGEDWYN (or Llakoltdwen), Caricab- 
THXR, a parish in the hun^* of Derllys, union of 
Narbeth, South Wales : 244 miles from London 
(coach road 238), 12 from St. Gear's, 14 from New- 
castle-in-£mlyn.-««o-Gt. West. Bail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, thence 30 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingliam, Grloucester, &o., 
235 miles. o *e » Money orders issued at St Clear's : 
London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 7 p.m. 
-o«s-The living (St Cedwyn), a disch^ rectory in 
the archd^' of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. Da- 
vid's, is valued at £2. 13s. 4d. : pres. net inoomOi 
£96 : patron, Jjord Chancellor : pres. incumbent 
John Evans, 1832: contains 69 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 328 : ass"*- prop^- £539 : poor rates in 1838, 
£79. 5s. 

LLANGEFELACn (or Llahoevelach), Gla- 
iioitOAK, a parish in the hun^ of Llangefelach, 
union of Swansea, South Wales, west of Sie river 
Tawe: the parish includes the hamlets of Close 
(Higher and Lower), Fenderry (Higher and Lower), 
and Bhyndroy-Clydach (Higher and Lower) : 218 
miles from London (coach rMd 204), 4 from Swan- 
sea, 6 from Neath.-«M».Gt. West BaiL through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swan- 
sea, thence 4 miles: from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 209 miles.-oM»-Money 
orders issued at Swansea : London letters deUv** 
3 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-^Mo-There is an Inde- 
pendent and Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. 
Numerous copper works and collieries give em- 
ployment to the inhabitants of the pari8h.-o«>The 
living (St. Cyvelach), a vicarage in the Hkt^hd''* of 
Carmarthen, and diocese of St David's, is valued 
at £9. 14s. 9^d. : pres. net income, £159 : patron, 
Bishop of St. David's : pres. incumbent, D. Evans, 
1845: contams 1,512 houses: pop"-in 1841, 9,394: 
prob. pop"- in 1849, 10,803: ass*- propy- £21,809: 
poor rates in 1838, £2,071. 18s.^»^Fair, Mar. 1. 

LLANGEFNI, AroLESET, a parish and small 
market town in the bun*'- of Menai, union of Angle- 
sey, North Wales : 256 miles from London (cMoh 
road 259), 12 from Beaumaris. -««»- Nor. West. 
Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to 
Bodorgan station, thence 5 miles : from Derby, 
through Oewe, &o., 156 miles.-«Me-Money ordera 
issued at Bangor : London letters deliv^ 7^ a.m. : 
post closes 4.35 p.m.«e«c:>The Wesleyan and Cal- 
vinistic Methodists, and the Independents, all have 
chapels here. The charities produce about £1. 78. 
per annum, besides six houses which are let to 
the poor, rent-frbe. The petty sessions for the 
district are held here. Llangefni unites with 
Beaumaris in sending one member to parliament, 
and is one of the polling-places for the county. 
-o«3-The living (St Cyngar), a disch*< rectory, 
with the curacy of Tregaion, in the arcbd'* of 
Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£9. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £446: patron. 
Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, £. Williams, 
1819: contains 339 houses: pop»- in 1841, 1,755: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 2,018 : a8s*-propy- £1,472: 
poor rates in 1838, £644. 7s.-««c^ Market day, 
Thursday. Fairs: March 14, April 17, June 10, 
Aug. 17, Sept 15, Oct 23, and sixth Thursday 




between Not. 13 and Dec. 25»^9*«>-Banker8 : Sub, 
Branch of North and South Wales Bank — draw on 
London and Westminster Bank ; Sub. Branch of 
National Provident Bank oi England— draw on 
London Joint-Stock Bank."OMa^Buir8 Head Inn. 

LLANGEINOR-ON-THE-HJLLLS (or Li^n- 
•rasoft), Glamorgan, a parish in the hon^ of Og- 
mott, unkm of Bridgend and Cowbridget SonUx 
Wales; 193 miles from London (coach road 181), 
i from Bridgend, 15 from Neath.-cMe»Gt. West* 
BaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Bridgend, thence 4 miles : from Derby, 
tfanmgh ^miiugham, Gloucester, &c., 184 miles. 
-e«e- Money orders issued at Bridgend: London 
letters dellr**- 8 a.m.: post closes 11} a.m.^o*o- 
The parish abounds with coal and iron.-o»>'Th& 
liring (St. Gwinewr), a perpetual curacy in the 
aichd^' and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £10 : 
pies, net income, £120: patron, C. B. M. Talbot : 
pres. incumbent, M. Lewdiyn, 1829 : contains 61 
hooBes: pop**- in 1841, 363: ass^ prop^^- £1,401: 
poor rates in 1838, £129. 14b. 

LLANGEINW^EN. ISAF and UCHAF, Anolb- 
8BT, a parish in the hun^ of Menai, union of Car- 
Barvon, North Wales: 244 miles from London 
(eoach road 252), 3 fh>m Carnarvon, 1 from New- 
borough. o« c i Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe, 
Chester, and Bangor, to Llanfair station, thence 2 
miles: froai Derby, through Crewe, &c, 144 
miles. •<««>- Money orders issued at Garnarvon : 
London letters d^iv^ 3^ p.m. : post closes 10 p.m. 
-««»>There is a Calvinistio Methodist chapel here. 
The parochial charities produce about £4. 10s. 
per anniua.--«MO'The living (St Ceinwen) is a rec- 
tmy, with the curacy of Llangaffo, in the archd^- 
and diocese of Bangor: pres. net income^ £664: 
patron, Mrs. Jane Hughes : pres. incumbent, W. 
WitUama, 1829; -contains 163 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 943: ass^- prop^"- £2,047: poor rates in 
1837, £347. 15s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLAKGEITHO, Cabdioan, a parish in the hun^ 
ofPenavth, union of Tregaron, South Wales: 217 
niles from London (coach road 210), 9 from Lam- 
peter, 12 from Aberystwith.-c.«-^t. West. Bail, 
throng Stonehouse and Gloucester to Boss, thence 
85 miieB : fh)m Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &0., 208 miles.-c>«»-Money orders issued at 
Lampeter: London letters deliv^ 6} p^m. : post 
ekwes 9 pjn.-«Mo.-Tfaere is a Calvinistio Methodist 
ehapel hers. The parochial charities produce 
about £50 a year.-o»«^The living (St. Ceitho), a 
diflch^ rectory in the axch^- of Cardigan, and dio- 
eese of St. David's, is valued at £6 : pres. net in- 
come, £106 : patnm, BSshop of St David's : pres. 
incumbent, Thomas Edwards : contains 70 houses : 
pop"* in 1841, 431: ass"** prop^- £790: poor rates 
in 1838, £55. 178. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGELER, Cabmabthbn, a parish in the 
hvn^ of Ehret, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, South 
Wales, on the river Teifi : 244 miles from London 
(ooabii road 229), 4 from Newcastle-iu-Emlyn, 14 
from Carmarthen. -oco-Gt West Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 30 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
luuB, Glouoester, &c, 235 miles.-oM»-Money orders 
iasoed at Carmarthen: London letters deliv^ 7 
p.BL: post closes 9 p.m.-o«a.The living (St Celert) ' 
ooDsists of a sinecure rectory rated at £12. 18s. 9d., , 



gross income, £212; and a vicarage rated at £6, 
13s. 4d., gross income, £160 : in the archd^* of 
Carmarthen, and diocese of St David's, the former 
being in the patronage of St. David's College, and 
the latter of the bishop: contains 345 houses : pop*** 
in 1841, 1,747: probable pop"- in 1849, 2,009: 
asB^- props'- £3,289 : poor rates in 1838, £616. Is, 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGELYNIN, Carnarvon, a parish in the 
bun**' of Isaf, union of Conway, North Wales, west 
of the river Conwy : 225 miles trom London (coach 
road 231), 2 from Conway, 17 from Bangor. ■ o >c. 
Nor. West Rail, through Crewe and Chester to 
Conway, thence 2 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 125 miles.^o«=>-Money orders issued at 
Conway : London letters deliv'- 3 p.m. : post closes 
10 a.m.-««<^There is an Independent chapel here. 
•<««>-The living (St. Celynin) is a disch^ rectory in 
the aichd^- and diocese of Bangor : pres. net in- 
come, £150: patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. in- 
cumbent, W. Price, 1843 : contains 52 houses : 
pop*"- in 1841, 270 : asa*^- prop^"- £1,029 : poor rates 
in 1838, £161 ; in 1847, £200.-»«:-ThomaB WU- 
liams, Esq., has a seat here, called Glynn. 

LLANGELYNIN (Higher and Lowxb), Mebio- 
NETH, a pariah in the bun'* of Tal-y-Bout, union of 
Dalgelly, North Wales : 255 miles from London 
(coach road 213) , 6 from Barmouth, S from Towyn. 
■<>*«>-Nor. West RaiL through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 45 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &C., 147 
miles. o « c Money orders issued at Corwen : London 
letters deliv^- 4 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-«*o-There 
are three Calvinistio Methodist chapels here. The 
parochial charities produce about £19 a year.-<3«»- 
The living (St. Celynin) is a rectory in the arcbd^* 
and diocese of Bangor: pres. net income, £400: 
patron, Capt T. P. J. Parry ; pres. incumbent, J. 
P. J. Parry, 1827: contains 206 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 1,033: ass'- prop)"- £3,683: poor rates in 
1838, £528. 2s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGENDEIRN, Carmabthbii, a parish in 
the hun^ of Kidwelly, union of Carmarthen, South 
Wales: 230 miles from London (coach road 216), 
6 from Carmarthen, 6 from Kidwelly .-o«e>-Gt West. 
Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 16 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 221 miles. 
-vMCi-Money orders issued at Carmarthen : London 
letters deUv*^ 4 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-xMe-.Thera 
is a Calvinistio Methodist chapel here. Coal, lime^ 
and ironstone abound in the parish, and marble of 
good quality is also found here.-oM»-The livings 
(St. Cynderyn), a perpetual curacy in the ardid'* 
of Carmarthen, and diocese of St David's, is valued 
at £6. 13s. 4d. : pres. net inoome, £88 : patron. 
Bees G. Thomas : pres. incumbent Daniel Jones, 
1833: contains 490 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 2,624: 
probable pop*^ in 1849, 3,018 : ass*- prop^- £8,222 : 
poor rates in 1838, £862. 2s.^<Mo-Fair, Aug. 5, for 
horses, cattle, and pedlery. 

LLANGENNECH, CABMAETHKif , a parish in the 
him*- of Gamwallan, union of Llanelly, South 
Wales, west of the Llougher river : 224 miles from 
London (coach road 216), 4 from Llanelly, 5 from 
Lloughcr.^oM>-Gt. West. BaiL through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 10 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 



cester, &c., 215 mi]es.-«>«e. Money orders issQed at 
Llanelly : London letters deliv^ 5 p.m. : post closes 
9 p.m.^3*:^The living (St. Gwynog), a perpetual 
curacy in the archd''* of Carmarthen, and diocese 
of St David's, is valued at £6. 13s. 4d.: pres. net 
income, £82 : patron, E. Rose Tunno : pres. in- 
cumbent, Thomas Morgan, 1839: contains 128 
houses: pop"- in 1841,893: ass*- prop^- £1,597 : 
poor rates in 1838, £211. 1 58.-o.c^Fair, Oct. 23, 
for cattle, horses, and pedlery. 

LLANGENNITH, GLAnoRaAN, a parish in the 
hun*- and union of Swansea, South Wales : 230 
miles from London (coach road 212), 16 from 
Swansea, 6 from Penrice. -a*^ Gi. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 16 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 221 miles. -o«o- 
Money orders issued at Swansea : London letters 
deliv** 6 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-o«c-There was 
formerly a- priory here, dedicated to St. Kemydd, 
subordinate to the abbey of Taurinus, in Nor- 
mandy; it was granted to All Souls College, Ox- 
ford, in 1441, by Henry VI.^s«c^ The living (St 
Cmydd) , a disch*- vicarage, in the archd'* of Car- 
marthen, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£5. 16s. 8d. : pres. net income, £65 : patron, T. 
Penrice^ Esq. : pres. incumbent, Samuel Phillips, 
1849: contains 74 houses: pop"* in 1841, 436: 
ass*- propy- £1,482 : poor rates in 1838, £70. 8s. 

LLANGENNY, Brecon, a parish in the hun** 
and union of Crickhowell, South Wales, on the 
river Usk: 160 miles from London (coach road 
155), 2 from Crickhowell, 9 from Abergavenny. 
-o»>Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Glou- 
cester to Monmouth, thence 18 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 151 miles. 
^o«<»Money orders issued at Crickhowell: Lon> 
don letters deliv*- 7^ a.m. : post closes 4} p.m. 
-oKxThere are some trifling charities here. Iron- 
founding and paper-making are carried on in the 
pari8h.-«*3-The living (St. Cenew) is a curacy, 
subordinate to the rectory of Llangattock: con- 
tains 82 houses : pop"- in 1841, 427 ; ass*- prop''- 
£2,913: poor rates in 1838, £188. 10s. Tithes 
commuted in 1840. 

LLANGERNYW, or LLAVOERinEw, (Upper and 
Lower), Denbigh, a parish in the hun*^ of Is- 
Dulas and Is-Iled, union of Llanrwst, North 
Wales, on the river Elwy: the parish includes 
the chapelry of Branar and Marchaled : 221 miles 
from London (coach road 224), 6 from Llanwrst, 
8 from Abergele.-«»«:^ Nor. West Rail, through 
Crewe and Chester to Abergele, thence 8 miles : 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 121 miles.-o«o- 
Money orders issued at Conway : London letters 
deliv'- 3 p.m. : post closes 4 p.m.^o«ci.The parochial 
charities produce about £23 a year. There arc 
three Calvinistic Methodist chapels hcre.-e*e>The 
living (St. Digain), a disch*^- vicarage in the 
archd''- and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £7. 
6s. O^d. : pres. net income, £275 : patron. Bishop 
of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, E. L. C. Jones, 
1843: contains 208 houses: pop"-, in 1841, 
1,118 : probable pop"- in 1849, 1,286: ass^- prop'^- 
£2,887 : poor rates in 1837, £333. 12s.^>*e^Fairs: 
March 29, May 16, June 29, September 29, No- 
vember 29. 

LLANGEVIEW, Monmouth, a parish in the 



I 



upper division of the hun^* of Usk, union of Pon- 
typool: 154 miles from London (coach road 141), 
1 from Usk, 12 from Monmouth.-o«»-Gt. West 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 12 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 145 miles. ^o«> 
Money orders issued at Usk : London letters 
deliv*- 8^ a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«>«s->The living 
(St. David), a perpetual curacy in the archd''- and 
diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £6 : pres. not in- 
come, £81 : patron, Rot. J. Blower : pres. incum- 
bent, J. Blower, 1829: contains 1,280 acres: 46 
houses: pop*** in 1841, 187: ass*- props'- £1,246: 
poor rates in 1838, £75. 6s. 

LLANGIAN, Carnarvon, a parish in the hun^ 
of Gafflogian, union of Pwllheli, North Wales: 
263 miles from London (coach road 249), 6 from 
Pwllheli, 8 from Nevin. -a*:- Gt. West. Rail. 
through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 25 
miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 163 
mile8.-o«<=- Money orders issued at Pwllheli : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- at noon : post closes 1 p.m.-<«e>> 
Some trifling charities belong to the parish.-<o*<» 
The living (St. Cian) is a curacy, subordinate to 
the rectory of Lianbedrog : contains 247 houses ; 
pop"- in 1841, 1,144: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,315: ass'^ prop^- £2,077: poor rates in 1838, 
£400. 5s. 

LLANGIBBY, Monmotjth, a parish in the lower 
division of the hun^- of Usk, union of Pontypool, 
bounded on the east by the Usk : 2 miles from 
Usk, 5 from Caerleon.-c>«»- (For access and postal 
arrangements, see LLAKaEY]EW.)^oM».TheTe is an 
Independent chapel here. -«•«>" The living (St 
Cuby), a rectory in the archd^* and diocese of 
Llandaff, is valued at £19. 10s. lOd. : pres. net 
income, £477 : patron, W. A. Williams : pres. 
incumbent, C. A. Williams, 1821 : contains 3,700 
acres : 83 houses: pop"- in 1841, 535: ass** prop^^' 
£3,971 : poor rates in 1838, £279. Us.^^^e-Llan- 
gibby Castle is the seat of William Addams Wil- 
liams, Esq., who, for several years, represented the 
county of* Monmouth in the House of Commons. 
Mr. Williams is a descendant of Caradog Vauch- 
fras, or Cradoc Fraich Fras, which means, ** Cradoc 
with the strong hand,'* who was, in right of his 
father, lord of Gloucester, and the grandson of 
Brychan Breheiniog, prince and lord of Brecknock, 
a contemporary with King Arthur, who Ured 
about the year 490, one of the knights of his round 
table, and lord- keeper of "ye Castell Dolorus," or 
the Dolorous tower. Cradoc was lord of Brecon 
after the death of all the sons of Brychan ; he was 
also lord of Ffen-egg, or Fferlex, which lies be- 
tween the Severn and the Wye, having obtained 
it by conquest previous to his entry into Wales. 
Cradoc was the direct ancestor of Gwymgy ap 
Gwenddy, who was king of Fferreg and Brecknock, 
whose great-grandson, Maenyrch ap Driffin, lord 
of Brecon, was the founder of many distinguished 
families in Wales ; and whose descendant, tiirongh 
a long series of ages, Sir Rowland Williams, Knt., 
of Llangibby Castle, was high sheriff of the county 
in the time of James 1. The grandson of that 
gentleman, Treror Williams, Esq., was created a 
baronet for his eminent services in the cause of 
Charles T. ; but his descendant, Sir John Williams, 
dying without male issue, the title went to his bro- 



LLA 



45 



LLA 



r 



ther. Sir Leonard, who dying childless, the baro- 
netcy expired, but the estates had preyioasly 
passed to EUen, the daughter of 8ir John, who, in 
1748, married William Addams, Esq., of Mon- 
moath, who assumed the additional surname of 
Williams. Of that gentleman, the present pro- 
prietor of Llangibby is the grandson. Mr. Wil- 
liams, who has been high sheriff of the county, is 
a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant of Monmouth- 
shire. 

LLANGIRRIG, Moxtgouekt, a parish in the 
bun**- of Llanidloes, union of Newtown and Llani- 
dloes, North Wales: 225 miles from London 
(ooach road 182), 5 from Llanidloes, 13 from 
Rhayader. o»e > Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 15 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford and Shrews- 
boiy, &C., 137 mile8.-e*e-Money orders isued at 
Llanidloes : London letters dehv^ 4 p.m. : post 
cloKS 9 p.m.-o«o-The living (St. Curig), a vicarage 
in the deanery of Amstly, and diocese of Bangor, 
is valued at £9. 10s.: pres. net income, £175: 
patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, Evan 
James, 1846 : contains 316 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
1,951: probable pop"- in 1849, 2,243: ass*- prop^- 
£2,782 : poor rates in 1837, £1,080. 6s. 

LLAN6ISTIL0US, Akquesey, a parish in the 
hun^ of Maltraeth, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales, west of the river Cefhi: 244 miles from 
London (coach road 250), 1 from Llangeffni, 9 
firom Bangor.-eM>-Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Bangor, thence 9 miles: from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 144 miles.-o^o^Money 
orders issued at Bangor : London letters deliv'- 8 
a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. «■ & There are an Inde- 
pendent and Calvinistio Methodist chapel here. 
This place is entitled, under the will of Bishop 
Rowliuids, to nominate a pensioner to the alms- 
houses at Bangor. o« e . The living (St Christiolus) is 
a perpetual curacy, with that of Cerregeinwen, in 
the archd''- and diocese of Bangror: patron and 
pres. incumbent, Bishop of Bangor : contains 185 
houses: pop*- in 1841, 938: ass<*- prop^"- £2,327: 
poor rates in 1838, £681. 5s. 

LLANGLYDWEN. See Llavoedwtk. 

LLANGOED, Akolbset, a parish in the hun^ 
of Tindaethwy, union of Bangor and Beaumaris, 
North Wales : 244 miles from London (coach road 
254), 3 from Beaumaris, 6 from Bangor, oio Nor. 
West Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 6 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
144 mile8.-<Me-Money orders issued at Beaumaris : 
London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 4^ p.m. 
-OM^-There is a Calvinistic MeUiodist chapel hero. 
The charities produce about £9 a year.-««»-The 
living (St Cawrdaw) is a perpetual curacy, with 
the curacies of Llanristyn and Llanfihangeltin- 
Klwy, in the srchd^- of Anglesey and diocese of 
Bangor: pres. net income, £90: patron, R. J. 
Hughes: pres. incumbent, John Owen Jones, 
1840: oontoins 124 houses: pop""- in 1841, 004: 
ass^ prop^- £644 : poor rates in 1838, £264. 

LLANGOEDMAWR (or Lakooedmokb), Car- 
DiOAX, a parish in the bun'- of Troed-yr-Aur, 
nnion of Oirdigan, South Wales, on the eastern 
bank of the Teifi : 264 miles from London (coach 
road 239), 1 from Cardigan, 9 from Newcastle. 
-e«»^Gt West Rail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 



ter, and Cliepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : 
from^ Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, 
&c., '255 miles."««e- Money orders issued at Cardi- 
gan : London letters deliv*** 8 j p.m. : post doses 9 
p.m.-o»o-There were formerly many Druidioal re- 
mains in the parish. -««»- The living (St. Cynllo), 
a rectory in the archd^- of Cardigan and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £12. 188. 6jd.: pres. net 
income, £329 : patron, St. David's College, Lam- ^ 
peter: pres. incumbent, W. North, 1840: contains* 
197 houses: pop"- in 1841, 985: ass*- prop^- 
£3,792 : poor rates in 1838, £355. 

LLANGOLLEN, Dendigh, a parish and market 
town in the bun*- of Chirk, union of Corwen, North 
Wales : 179 miles from London (coach road 184), 
23 from Chester. -o«<=-Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Llangollen 
station: from Derby, through Stafford and Shrews- 
bury, &c., 95 miles.^oM> Money orders issued here : 
London letters deliv*- 8} a.m.: post closes 4} 
p.m.-csMs-The town is situated on the banks of the 
river Dee, which is here crossed by a bridge of 
five arches, erected in 1357 by Bishop Trevor. 
The parish is divided into three separate traians or 
districts, termed, respectively, Langollcn-traian, 
Trevor- traian, and Traian-y-Glynn ; the two first, 
which lie contiguous to each other, are divid- 
ed from the last by an intervening mountain; 
they had but one church in common, although 
each district has its own churchwarden. A 
new church has lately been erected in Glynn- 
traian, called Pontfadoc. The town, situated 
in the romantic and very beautiful vale to 
which it gives its name, wears only a dingy 
and forbidding aspect, from the dark-coloured 
shale-stone and slate of which the houses are built 
It is, however, much frequented by visitors, on 
account of the remarkable natural beauties by 
which it is surrounded. In the church there is 
nothing worthy of notice — ^it is a homely structure, 
with a square tower at the west end; but the 
churchyard will amply repay any one for the 
trouble of pacing it, by the splendid panorama of 
nature which there lays open to view. The prin cipal 
trade of the place consists in the manufacture of 
flannels, but there are also three mills for the 
making of what are more particularly termed 
woollen cloths. The county magistrates hold 
their meetings here. Considerable remains of the 
ancient castle of Dinas Bran, or Crow Castle, still 
exist, nearly covering the hill on which that for- 
tress stood. Near here, also, are the beautiful 
ruins of Vale Crucis Abbey. Though terribly 
mutilated, they yet present some fine remains of 
the pointed order of Gothic architecture, arid seem 
as if they had been placed in the very spot on 
which they stand for the purpose of picturesque 
effect. The abbey was founded by Madog a 
Gryffydd Maelor, Prince of Powys, for tlie monks 
of the Cistertian order, and at the general dissolu- 
tion of the monasteries had a revenue of £214. 3s. 
5d. Llangollen is one of the polling-places for 
the county. e> & The living (St. CoUen), a vicarage 
in the archd^- and diocese of St Asaph, is valued 
at £9. lis. lO^d. : pres. net income, £422, a 
house, and seven acres of glebe : patron. Bishop 
of St. Asaph : pres. incuiEbent, W. Edwards, 
1849: pop'*- in 1841, 4,906: probable pop»- in 




1849, 5,642: poor rates in 1838, £917. 8b. 
Tithes commnted in 1839.-«Mo-Market day, Satur- 
day. Fairs : last Friday in January, March 17, 
May 31, August 21, November 22.'OM>-£agle Inn. 
Hand and Royal Hotels. 

LLANGOLMAN, Pembroke, a parish in the 
hun**' of Kcmess, union of Narbeth, South Wales : 
254 miles from London (coach road 243), 8 from 
• Narbeth, 12 from Cardigan.-=>«ci-Gt. West. Rail. 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 40 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 245 miles, -om^ 
Money orders issued at Narbeth : London letters 
deliv^- 10 a.m.: post closes 7 J p.m.-o«o-The liring 
(St. Golman) is a perpetual curacy, with that of 
Llandilo, in the archd^- and diocese of St. David's: 
pres. net income, £97 : patron, H. W. Bowen, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, George Harris : contains 
59 houses: pop"- in 1841, 255: ass*- prop^- £759: 
poor rates in 1838, £91. lis. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANGORSE (Lower and Upper), Beecoit, a 
parish in the hun^ of Talgarth, union of Brecon, 
South Wales : the parish includes Trevlnan, and 
part of the township of Llnnywem: 169 miles 
from London (coach road 1C8), 7 from Brecon, 
12 from Crickhowell.^3«c-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
27 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 160 miles.-*>»ea- Money orders is- 
sued at Brecon : London letters deliv^- 10) a.m. : 
post closes 1^ p.m.-o«3>The parochial charities 
produce about £14 a year.^=>«c^The living (St. 
Faulinus), a vicarage in the archd^- of Brecon, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £5. 10s. : pres. 
nut income, £170 : patron, Dean and Chapter of 
Windsor : contains 91 houses : pop^ in 1841, 
397: ass*- prop^- £1,517: poor rates in 1838, 
£195. 6s. 

LLANGOYEN, Monmouth, a parish in the 
upper division of the hun*- of Ragland, union of 
Monmouth: 149 miles from London (coach road 
136), 4 from Ragland, 7 from Monmouth.-o«cs-Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Monmouth, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 140 miles, -ok*- 
Money orders issued at Monmouth : London let- 
ters deliv** 9 J a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«9«o-The 
parochial charities produce about £ld a year.^oM»- 
The Uving (St. Goven), a perpetual curacy, with 
that of Fenclawdd, in the archd^- and diocese of 
Llandaff, is valued at £3. 7s. Id.: pres. net 
income, £120 : patron, Dean and Chapter of 
Llandaff: pres. incumbent, J. Farquhar, 1838: 
contains 1,800 acres: 23 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
136: ass*- propy- £1,009: poor rates in 1838, £63. 
10s. 

LLANGOWER, Merioneth, a parish in the 
hun** of Penllyn, union of Bala, North Wales, on 
the eastern bank of Bala lake: 201 miles from 
London (coach road 197), 3 from Bala, 20 from 
LlanfyIlin.-o«<»-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 24 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 116 niiles.->»«e>^Money orders issued at 
Corwen : London letters deliv** noon : post closes 
noon.-«>«>-There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel 
here.-««o-The living (St. Gwyr), a disch*- rectory 



in the archd^* and diocese of St. Aiiapb, is valued 
at £5. 5s. : pres. net income, £136 : patron. 
Bishop of St Asaph: pres. incumbent, Hugh 
Jones, 1817: contains 89 houses: pop** in 1841, 
368 : as6*« prop)"- £1,693 : poor rates in 1838, 
£209. 5s. 

LLANGRANOG, Cabdiqah, a parish in tiio 
hun** of Moyddyn, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales : 264 miles from London (ccmch 
road 225), 10 from Cardigan, 11 from Newcastle, 
-«*o^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thenoe 50 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c, 255 miles. ^«>*o> Money orders issued at 
Cardigan: London letters deliv** 8} a.m. : post 
closes 7^ p.m.-««»^The living (St. Caranog) is a 
vicarage annexed to Llandissilio-Gtogo: contains 
206 houses: pop"* in 1841, 884: ase*- props'' 
£1,500: poor rates in 1838, £348. Ids. 'Hthes 
commuted in 1840.-o*=^Fair, May 27. 

LLANGREDIFEL. See PENMraoD. 

LLANGSTON. See Lanostome. 

LLANGUA, Monmouth, a parish in the npper 
division of the hun** of Skenfreth, union of D^re : 
156 miles from London (coach road 145), 11 from 
Abergavenny, 14 from Monmouth.^o^o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 14 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 147 miles, -omi- 
Money orders issued at Abergravenny : London 
letters deliv** 11 a.m. : post closes 2 p.nu q ae . The 
living (St. James), a disch*- rectory in the archd'* 
and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £2. 158. lOd.: 
pres. net income, £120: patron, J. L. Scudamore : 
pres. incumbent, William E. Sellan, 1846 : con- 
tains 890 acres: 14 houses: pop"* in 1841, 99: 
ass*- prop»- £608 : poor rates in 1838, £27. lOs. 

LLANGUICK. See Llan-Ciwo. 

LLANGUINOR. SeeLLAKOBtvoR-oN-THA-HiLLS. 

LLANGUNNOCH. See Li^AKOTHHoe. 

LLANGWENLLWYFO, Anolesby, a parish in 
the hun** of Twrcelyn, North Wales: the parish 
includes the hamlet of Dulas: 256 miles from 
London (coach road 262), 4 from Amiwoh, 6 firom 
Llanerofa-y-med. -«•»- Ner. West. Rail, through 
Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Llanfair station, 
thence 14 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &o., 
156 miles. a > c i Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv^ 10} aon. : post doses 1} 
p.m. ■ 9 « o The parochial charities produce about £2. 
10s. per annum.-e*e-Contains 108 houses: pop"* 
in 1841, 594: ass*- piop^* £1,027. 

LLANGWILLOG, Avolesbt, a parish in thd 
hun*- of Menai, union of Anglesey, North Wales: 
251 miles from London (coach road 264), 3 fkem 
Gwindy, 12 from Holyhead.-=»*c-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crowe, Chester, and Bangor, to Gaerwen 
station, thence 6 miles: from Derby, through 
Crowe, &c., 151 miles, ^ •e . Money orders issued 
at Bangor : London letters deliv*- 10} a.m. : post 
closes 1} p.m.-ow»"There are some trifling cha- 
rities belonging to the parish.-oM>-The living (8t. 
Cwyllog), a perpetual curacy in the arohd^'- and 
diocese of Bangor, is valued at £5 : pres. net in- 
come, £90 : patron, Sir R. B. W. Bulkeley, Bart : 
pres. incumbent, £. Williams, 1837 : contains 42 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 260: ass*- prop^* £729: 
poor rates in 1838, £207. 10s. 



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47 



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LIiANGWM, Dkctioh, a parish in the hun^ of 
la-Akd, anion of Gorwen, North Wales, on a branch 
of the Dee: 211 miles from London (coach road 
202), 6 from Cerig-y-Dmidion, 8 from Corwen. 
a «e Nor. West. Bail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbory to Llangollen, thence 22 miles : from 
Derby, throngh Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 118 
iniIes.-o«o.Money orders issued at Corwen : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ at noon: poet closes at noon. 
o«a The charities produce about £7 a year.-oM»- 
The living (St Heirom) is divided into a sinecure 
rectory, rated at £11. 4s. 7d., gross income, £177; 
and a disch^ vicarage, rated at £6, and returned 
at £142 gross ; it is in the archd^* and diocese of 
St. Asaph: patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph: pop^ 
in 1841, 1,017: poor rates in 1838, £373. 17s. 
Tithes commuted in I840.^s«ei-Fair, April 18. 

LLANGWM (IcHA and Ucha), Mohmouth, a 
parish in the upper division of the bun'* of Usk, 
onion of Chepstow : 148 miles from London (coach 
road 139), 4 fh>m Usk, 8 from Chepstow.-ovo-Gt 
West. Baal, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Chepstow, thence 8 miles: from Derby, through 
Binningham, Gloucester, &c., 139 miles. -««>- 
Money orders issued at Usk: London letters deliv^* 
9 a»m.: post closes 3} p.m.-«M»-The living (St. 
Jerome), a disch^ vicarage in the archd^* and dio- 
eese of IJandaff, is valued at £4. 10s. 8d. : pros. 
net income, £83 : patron, the Prebendary thereof: 
pros, incumbent, John Fleming, 1835: contains 
d,420 acres: 62 houses: pop**- in 1841, 350: ass^ 
piop^- £2,334: poor rates in 1838, £154. 

LLANGWM, Pembbokb, a parish in the hun^ 
of Rhoose, union of Haverfordwest, South Wales: 
264 miles from London (coach road 271), 5 from 
EbiVeribrdwest, 6 from Pembroke.^cM»^t. West 
BaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Cbep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 255 miles. 
o« e Money orders issued at Haverfordwest : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 8^ a.m.: post closes 8) p.m. 
a « P T he living (St. Hierom), a disch^- rectory in 
the aichd^' and diocese of St David's, is valued at 
£7. 12s. lid.: pres. net income, £100: patron, 
Mrs. O. Barlow and Sir J. Owen, alternately: 
pres. inoumbent, Thomas Williams : contains 131 
hooses: pop"- in 1841, 797: ass^^- piop^"- £321: 
poor rates in 1838, £1*96. lis. Tithes commuted 
in 1840. 

LLANGWNODYL (or Llakowvadlb), Cabhas- 
▼ov, a parish in the hun^ of Comitmaen, union of 
FwUheli, North Wales: 276 miles from London 
(oosch road 248), 12 from PwllheU, 12 from Neyin. 
■»*e* Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thence 38 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 176 miles. -"mo- Money orders issued 
at Pwllheli: London letters deli v*** 1^ p.m. : post 
doses m a.m. o *e » The church is very ancient. 
There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The 
parochial charities produce about £10 a year. q»o 
The living (St. Gwynodl) is a perpetual curacy in 
the aichd'* and diocese of Bangor : pres. net in- 
come, £50: patron, Sir J. S. Piozzi Salusbury, 
Bart. : pres. ineumbent, John Evans, 1813 : con- 
tains 56 houses: pop"*- m 1841, 309: ass*^ prop}"' 
£71 1 : poor rates in 1838, £86. 

LLANGWNOB (or Llanoumnor), Casmarthxh, 
a parish in the hun^ of Kidwelly, union of Carmar- 



then, South Wales, on the southern bank of the 
Towy: 234 miles from London (coach road 218), 

1 from Carmarthen, 10 from Kidwelly. -o«>Gt. 
West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 20 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 225 
miles, q t o Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv^* 3 p.m. : post closes 9 a.m. 
-«•«»- The living (St. Cynyr), a disch*** vicarage in 
the archd''- of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3 : pres. net income, £221 : 
patron, Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, 
James Griffiths, 1827: contains 180 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 1,229: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,413: 
ass^- prop)"- £6,041: poor rates in 1838, £483. 18s. 

LLANGWYFAN, Anoleset, a parish in the 
hun^- of Malltraeth, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales : 256 miles from London (coach road 270), 
11 from Llangeffni, 10 from Holyhead.-o«o^Nor. 
West. Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Ty-Croes station, thence 2 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 156 miles.-<o«»^Mon6y orders 
issued at Bangor: London letters deliv^- 10} a.m.: 
post closes 1} p.m.-eMi-The parochial charities 
produce about £29 a year.-e«o.The living (St 
Cwyvan) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of 
Trefdaeth: contains 40 houses: pop**- in 1841, 
193: ass^- prop^"- £1,292: poor rates in 1838, 
£95. 9s. ' Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGWYFAN, Denbigh, a parish in the 
hun'- and union of Buthin, North Wales, on a 
branch of the Clydd: 203 miles from London 
(coach road 217), 8 from Buthin, 3 from Denbigh. 
*e«>-Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Holywell, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &o., 103 miles. -o«o Monc3(;.order8 issued at 
Buthin: London letters deliv'^' 11 a.m. : post closes 

2 p.m.-«M»*There is an Independent church here. 
o«e» The living (St Cwyvan) , a disch*- rectory in 

the deanery of Dyfiryn-Clydd, and diocese of Ban- 
gor, is valued at £7. ISs. 9d. : pres. net income, 
£256 : patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
B. L. A. Bobcrts, 1829 : contains «ol houses : popl- 
in 1841, 264: ass^ prop)"* £1,266: poor rates in 
1838, £165. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANGWYSTINNYN, Cabnabvon, a parish in 
the hun^* of Creuddyn, union of Conway, North 
Wales: 227 mUes from London (coach road 233), 

3 from Conway, 8 from Abergele,-«3»-Nor. West. 
Bail, through Crewe and Chester to Conway, thence 
3 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &o., 127 
miles.-e«o.Money orders issued at Conway : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 3 p.m. : poet closes 10 a.m.-oM». 
The parochial charities produce about £20 a year. 
-<>«»-The living (St. Constantine) is a perpetual 
curacy in the archd'* and diocese of St Asaph : 
pres. net income, £145: patron, Bishop of St. 
Asaph : pres. incumbent, £. Bobarts, 1846 : pop"' 
in 1841, 599 : poor rates in 1838, £319. 

LLANGYBI, Carnarvoh, a parish in the hun'* 
of Evionydd, union of Pwllheli, North Wales : 262 
miles from London (coach road 239), 7 from Pwll- 
heli, 16 from Carnarvon. -««». Nor. West. Bail, 
through Crewe and Cliester to Bangor, thence 24 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 162 miles. 
-e«»> Money orders issued at PwUheli: London 
letters deliv*- 12 J p.m. : post closes 12 J p.m.-o*<»- 
An Independent church was founded here in 1660. 



1849, 5,642: poor rates in 1838, £917. 8b. 
Tithes commnted in 1839.-'«*<>'Market day, Satur- 
day. Fairs : last Friday in January, March 17, 
May 31, August 21, NoYember 22.^oM:^£agle Inn. 
Hand and Royal Hotels. 

LLANGOLMAN, Psiibrokk, a parish in the 
hun**' of Kemess, union of Narbeth, South Wales : 
254 miles from London (coach road 243), 8 from 
• Narbeth, 12 from Cardigan.^3«ei-Gt. West. Rail. 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 40 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 245 miles. -aM>- 
Money orders issued at Narbeth : London letters 
dcliv*- 10 a.m.: post closes 7 J p.m.-o«c^The liring 
(St. Golman) is a perpetual curacy, with that of 
Llandilo, in the archd^- and diocese of St. David's: 
pres. net income, £97 : patron, H. W. Bowen, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, George Harris : contains 
59 houses: pop"- in 1841, 255: ass*- prop^- £769: 
poor rates in 1838, £91. lis. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANGORSE (Lower and Ufpbr), Brecoit, a 
parish in the hun^ of Talgarth, union of Brecon, 
South Wales : the parish includes Trevinan, and 
part of the township of Lknywem: 169 miles 
from London (coach road 168), 7 from Brecon, 
12 from Crickhowell.-o«c-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
27 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 160 miles. -o.©- Money orders is- 
sued at Brecon : London letters deliv^- 10) a.m. : 
post closes 1} p.m.'cwe-The parochial charities 
produce about £14 a year.-o»c^The living (St. 
Paulinus), a vicarage in the archd^- of Brecon, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £5. lOs. : pros, 
net income, £170 : patron, Dean and Chapter of 
Windsor : contains 91 houses : pop^ in 1841, 
397: ass"- prop^- £1,517: poor rates in 1838, 
£195. 6s. 

LLANGOYEN, Monmouth, a parish in the 
upper division of the hun**- of Ragland, union of 
Monmouth: 149 miles from London (coach road 
136), 4 from Ragland, 7 from Monmouth.^o*ci-Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Monmouth, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 140 miles. -o«>- 
Money orders issued at Monmouth : London let- 
ters deliv*- 9 J a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-=»»<=^The 
parochial charities produce about £13 a year.'^Mci- 
The living (St. Goven), a perpetual curacy, with 
that of Penclawdd, in the archd^- and diocese of 
Llandaff, is valued at £3. 78. Id. : pres. net 
income, £120 : patron. Dean and Chapter of 
Llandaff: pres. incumbent, J. Farquhar, 1838: 
contains 1,800 acres: 23 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
136: ass*- prop^^- £1,009: poor rates in 1838, £63. 
10s. 

LLANGOWER, Merioneth, a parish in the 
hun** of Penllyn, union of Bala, North Wales, on 
the eastern bank of Bala lake : 201 miles flrom 
London (coach road 197), 3 from Bala, 20 from 
Llanfyllin.-o«»-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 24 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 116 niiles.-A'e^Money orders issued at 
Corwen : London letters deliv**' noon : post closes 
noon.-<9«>-There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel 
here.-o«o»-The living (St. Gwyr), a disch*- rectory 



in the archd>^- and diocese of Si. Amph, is valued 
at £5. 5s. : pres. net income, £136 : patron, 
Bishop of St Asaph: pres. incambent, Hugh 
Jones, 1817: contains 89 houses: p(^ in 1841, 
368 : as8^ prop]"- £1,693 : poor rates in 1838, 
£209. 5s. 

LLANGRANOG, CARDiaAH, a parish in tiie 
hun^ of Moyddyn, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales : 264 miles from London (coach 
road 225), 10 from Cardigan, 11 from Newcastle, 
■«3«c».Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &e., 255 mile8.^oM>-Money orders issued at 
Cardigan: London letters deliv^* 8} a.m. : post 
closes 71 p.m.-o«ci>The living (St. Caranog) is a 
vicarage annexed to Llandissilio-Gtogo : contains 
206 houses: pop"* in 1841, 884: ase^ prop^'- 
£1,500: poor rates in 1838, £348. Ids. "Hthefl 
commuted in 1840.-e«=-^Fair, May 27. 

LLANGREDIFEL. See Penmthod. 

LLANGSTON. See Lanostone. 

LLANGUA, Monmouth, a parish in the tipper 
division of the hun*** of Skenfreth, union of Dore : 
156 miles from London (coach road 145), 11 from 
Abergavenny, 14 from Monmouth.-o«>-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 14 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 147 miles. o » & 
Money orders issued at Abergavenny: London 
letters deliv^ 11 a.m. : post doses 2 p.m. q ae . The 
living (St. James), a disch^* rectory in the archd'* 
and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £2. 15s. lOd.: 
pres. net income, £120: patron, J. L. Scndamore: 
pres. incumbent, William £. Sellan, 1846 : con- 
tains 890 acres: 14 houses: pop*^^ in 1841, 99: 
ass**- prop»- £608 : poor rates in 1838, £27. lOs. 

LLANGUICK. See Llan-Ciwo. 

LLANGUINOR. SeeLLAKOEivoR-ox-THB-HiLLB. 

LLANGUNNOCH. See LLAKOVKHoe. 

LLANGWENLLWYFO, Anglesey, a parish in 
the hun^ of Twrcelyn, North Wales r the parish 
includes the hamlet of Dnlas; 256 miles from 
London (coach road 262), 4 from Amiwoh, 6 fW>m 
Llaneroh-y-med. fci n Ncmt. West. Rail, thnmgh 
Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Llanfair station, 
thence 14 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &a, 
156 miles. -eM>- Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv^ 10} a.m. : post doses 1} 
p.m.-««o'The parochial charities produce about £2. 
10s. per annum.-e*e-Contains 108 hoases: pop**' 
in 1841, 594: ass*- prop^- £1,027. 

LLANGWILLOG, Akoleset, a parish in tha 
hun^ of Menai, union of Anglesey, North Wales: 
251 miles from London (coach road 264), 3 fVom 
Gwindy, 12 from Holyhead.-««c^Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Gaerwen 
station, thence 6 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 151 miles.-e*o^Moiiey orders issued 
at Bangor : lx)ndon letters deliv^ 10} a.m. : post 
closes 1} p.m.-e«»-There are some trifling cha- 
rities belonging to the parish.-<e«e^The living (8t. 
Cwyllog), a perpetual curacy in the arohd^- and 
diocese of Bangor, is valued at £5 : pfes. net in- 
come, £90: patron. Sir R. B. W. Balkeley, Bart. : 
pres. incumbent, £. Williams, 1837 : contains 42 
houses: pop*** in 1841, 260: ass"*- props'- £729: 
poor rates in 1838, £207. 10s. 



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47 



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LIaANGWM, Dbhbioh, a paxish in tlie hnn^ of 
Is- Aled, union of Gorwen, Noxth Wales, on a branch 
of the Dee: 211 miles from London (coach road 
202), 6 from Cerig-y-Dmidion, 8 from Corwen. 

a« B Nor. West. Bail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsboiy to Llangollen, thence 22 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 118 
iiii]e8.-oM»-Money orders issued at Corwen: Lon- 
don letters deliv^ at noon: post closes at noon. 

o«a The charities produce about £7 a year.^oM>- 
The liTing (St Heirom) is diyided into a sinecure 
rectory, rated at £ll. 4s. 7d., gross income, £177; 
and a discM* yicarage, rated at £6, and returned 
at £142 gross; it is in the archd^* and diocese of 
BL Asaph: patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph: popl- 
in 1841, 1,017: poor rates in 1838, £373. 17s. 
Tithes commuted in 1840.-<9«»-Fair, April 18. 

LLANGWM (IcHA and Ucha), Monmouth, a 
parish in the upper diyision of the hun^* of Usk, 
union of Chepstow : 148 miles from London (coach 
road 139), 4 fh>m Usk, 8 from Chepstow. -o^o-Gt 
West. BaiL through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Chepstow, thence 8 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 139 miles. «eM» 
Money orders issued at Usk: London letters deliv^* 
9 a.iD.: post closes 3} p.m.-«M»-The living (St. 
Jerome), a disch^* vicarage in the archd^* and dio- 
eese of IJandaff, is valued at £4. 10s. 8d. : pros. 
net income, £83 : patron, the Prebendary thereof: 
pros, incumbent, John Fleming, 1835: contains 
3,420 acres: 62 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 350: ass*^ 
piop^* £2,334: poor rates in 1838, £154. 

LLANGWM, Pbmbbokb, a parish in the ban^ 
of Rhoose, union of Haverfordwest, South Wales: 
264 miles from London (coach road 271), 5 from 
Haverfordwest, 6 from Pembroke.^<»«o^Gt. West. 
BaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 255 miles. 

g» e . Money orders issned at Haverfordwest : Lon- 
don letters deliv*^ 8} a.m.: post closes 8^ p.m. 

o«o T he living (St. Hierom), a disch'- rectory in 
the aichd'* and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£7. 12s. lid.: pres. net income, £100: patron, 
Mrs. O. Barlow and Sir J. Owen, alternately: 
pres. incumbent, Thomas Williams : contains 131 
houses: pop^ in 1841, 797: ass''- prop^"- £321: 
poor rates in 1838, £l'96. lis. Tithes commuted 
in 1840. 

LLANGWNOD YL (or Llanowvauls), Cabhae- 
▼ov, a parish in the hnn^ of Comitmaen, union of 
Pwllheli, North Wales: 276 miles from London 
(coach road 248), 12 from PwUheU, 12 from Nevin. 

■ a >p Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thence 38 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 176 miles. -"mo- Money orders issued 
at Pwllheli: London letters deliv'* 1^ p.m.: post 
closes 11} a.m.-o*»>The church is very ancient. 
There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The 
parochial charities produce about £10 a year. q»o 
The living (St. Gwynodl) is a perpetual curacy in 
the archd'^' and diocese of Bangor : pres. net in- 
come, £50 : patron. Sir J. S. Piozzi Salusbury, 
Bart. : pres. incumbent, John Evans, 1813 : con- 
tains 56 houses: pop"*- in 1841, 309: ass"^ prop^- 
£711: poor rates in 1838, £86. 

LLANG WNOB^or Llamgumnor), Casmarthxh, 
a parish in the hun*^* of Kidwelly, union of Carmar- 



then, South Wales, on the southern bank of the 
Towy : 234 miles from London (coach road 218), 

1 from Carmarthen, 10 from Kidwelly.-o«>Gt. 
West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 20 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 225 
miles. a > c i Money orders issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv'* 3 p.m. : post closes 9 a.m. 

o«c* The living (St. Cynyr), a disch*** vicarage in 
the archd^- of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3 : pres. net income, £221 : 
patron. Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, 
James Griffiths, 1827: contains 180 houses : pop"* 
in 1841, 1,229: probable pop»- in 1849, 1,413: 
ass^- prop''- £6,041: poor rates in 1838, £483. 18s. 

LLANGWYFAN, Anoleset, a parish in the 
hun*^ of Malltraeth,. union of Anglesey, North 
Wales: 256 miles from London (coach road 270), 
11 from Llangeffni, 10 from HoIyhead.-oM>-Nor. 
West Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Ty-Croes station, thence 2 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 156 miles.-o«ci>Money orders 
issued at Bangor: London letters deliv*** 10} a.m.: 
post closes 1} p.m.-o«e^The parochial charities 
produce about £29 a yeaT.-e«o-The living (St 
Cwyvan) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of 
Trefdaetii: contains 40 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
193: ass^- prop^- £1,292: poor rates in 1838, 
£95. 9s. ' Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGWYFAN, Denbigh, a parish in the 
hun^' and union of Buthin, North Wales, on a 
branch of the Clydd: 203 miles from London 
(coach road 217), 8 from Buthin, 3 from Denbigh. 
-o*»-Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Holywell, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &o., 103 miles.-o«> Mone^-orders issued at 
Ruthin: London letters deliv^* 11 a.m. : post closes 

2 p.m.^o*c»-There is an Independent church here. 
o«c» The living (St. Cwyvan), a disch**- rectory in 

the deanery of Dyffryn-dydd, and diocese of Ban- 
gor, is valued at £7. 18s. 9d. : pres. net income, 
£256 : patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
R. L. A. Bobcrts, 1829 : ctmtains 51 houses : pop*^ 
in 1841, 264: ass^ prop)^' £1,266: poor rates in 
1838, £165. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANGWYSTINNYN, Cabnabvon, a parish in 
the bun*'* of Creuddyu, union of Conway, North 
Wales: 227 miles from London (coach road 233), 

3 from Conway, 8 from Abergele.-o»-Nor. West. 
Bail, through Crewe and Chester to Conway, thence 
3 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 127 
miles.-o«si-Money orders issued at Conway : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 3 p.m. : post doses 10 a.m.-«M»- 
The parochial charities produce about £20 a year. 
-oM»-The living (St. Constantine) is a perpetual 
curacy in the archd^* and diocese of St. Asaph : 
pres. net income, £145: patron, Bishop of St. 
Asaph : pres. incumbent, £. Bobarts, 1846 : popl- 
in 1841, 599 : poor rates in 1838, £319. 

LLANGYBI, Carnarvoh, a parish in the bun'* 
of Evionydd, union of Pwllheli, North Wales : 262 
miles from London (coach road 239), 7 from Pwll- 
heli, 16 from Carnarvon. -e«>. Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Clicster to Bangor, thence 24 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &o., 162 miles. 
-e«»> Money orders issued at PwUheli: London 
letters deliv^ 12^ p.m. : post closes 12} p.m.-e«o. 
An Independent church was founded here in 1660. 



LLA 



LLA. 



W. Price, Esq., ereclod nlmshoiiBCB here in 1760, 
the inmateg of wbich each reci-ive £i « ye«r; tba 
other charities produce ahont £2. 10s. per anunm. 
--«-The liTing (St. Cybi), a rectory, with that of 
IJanamioii, in the aichd''- and diocEse of Bangor, 
is valued at £15. 3b. 4d. : prcs. aet iDcome, £450: 
imtron, Bishop of Bangor: pre*, incumbent, St. 
G. A. ■WiUiamB, 1849: pop-- in 1841,726; ponr 
rales in 1838, £185. 128. Titbes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANGYBT, Cardio*h, a pariah in the bun* 
of Moyddyn, union of Ijunpeter, South Wales, 
west of the Teifi ; 270 milei from London (coach 
road 204), 4 ftom Lampeter, 7 from TregaroQ.~«- 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonchoose, Gloucenter, 
and Chepstow, to XJnndeilo-Fawr, thence 20 miles r 
from Darby, through Birroingham. Gloucenter, &e., 
2£1 miles. ^>» Money orders lEsued at Lampeter; 
London letters deliv''- 5 p.m.: poet closes 9 p.ni. 
-~=-An Independent church was formed here in 
1772; and there are two Calvinistic Methodist 
chapels here.-M=-Tho living, a perpetual curacy 
in the archd'- of Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £2: pres. net income, £60: patron, 
Eacl of Lisbume and Lord Carrington, alternately : 
pres. incnmbcnt, M. Williams, 1842: contains 56 
bouses: pop-- in 1841, 274: ass" ■prop^£600: poor 
latesinlSSS, £72. 

LLANGYNFELIN, CinniaAN, a parish in the 
bnn''' of Qeneuc-Qlyna, nnion of Aborystnith, 
South WileB : 244 miles from London (coach road 
217), 6 from Aberyatwith. 9 from TowyB.~— Nor. 
West. Kail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Newtown, thenc« 34 miles; from Derby, 
throngh Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 141 miles.~o»~ 
Money orders issued at Abcrystnith ; London let- 
ters deliv'- 5i p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.~— -There 
are the remains here of the castle of Wyddno, 
which belonged to Qwydno Gwranlin, who in aaid 
to have toEt a considerable space of ground here 
through an innndation of the sea. =•= The. living, 
a perpetual curacy in the archd'' of Cardigan, end 
diocese of SL David's, is valued at £6. 13s. 4d. : 
prea. net income, £176 ; patron, J. P. B. Chiches- 
ter: pres. incumbent, John Davies, 1849: con- 
tains 190 houses : pop°- in 1841, 642 : asa''- prop^- 
£1,120; poor rates in lfl38, £184. 

LLANGYNHAFAL, Dembtqh, a parish in the 
hun* and nnion of Euthin, North Waie»: 193 
miles fVom London (coach road 207), 4 from 
Knthin, 8 from Denbigh.^— °- Nor. West. Rail, 
through WolTerhampton and Shrewsbury to Wrex- 
ham-Regis, thence 13 miles : IVom Derby, through 
Stafford, Sbrewsbary, &c., 116 mUes.~»<>'MoDoy 
orders issaed U BnUiin : London letters deliv^ 10 
a.m.: post closes 3 p.m.-«c>Tbere In a Calvinistic 
Methodist chapel here. The parochial charities 
produce abolit £14 a year.— c-The living (St. 
Cynhaval), a disoh*- rectory in tlje deanery of 
Dryflin-Clivydd, and diocese of liangor, is valued 
at £15. 15s.-, pres. net income, £407: patron. 
Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, John Jones, 
1831: contains 100 houses: pop"- in 1841, 602: 
BEs*- prop^- £2,251 : poor rates in 1838, £318. 17s. 

LLANGYNJN(orLl.ANDOIl.-NllIQ),C*Rll*HTHES, 

• parish in the hun''- of Derllys, union of Carmar- 
then, South Wales, on the river Taff: 242 miles 
ftom London (coach road 229), 3 ftom St. dear's. 



I 1 1 from CannaTtfaen.-«>-Gt. West. R«I. through 
Stonchousc, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to (Swansea, 
thence 28 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 233 miles.— =-Money orders 
isaned at St. Clear's: London letters deliv*- 7 p.m.: 
post closes 9 p m.-nc There are two Independent 
cliapels hore.^— The living (St. Cynin) is » per- 
petual cnracy in the archd'- of CarmBrthon, and 
diocese of St. David's; pres. net income, £74; 
patron, J. L. Phillips, Esq.; pres. incumbent, 
Cbnrles Phillips, 1808 : contains 76 houses: pop*- 

■ in 1841, 405: ass*- propr- £2,063; poor rates in 
1638, £149. 13a.— ^Fair, January 18. 

LLANOYNLT.O, CAaoiaAN, a parish in the bnn^ 
of Trocdyraur, union of Ne wcas tie-in- Emiyn, 
South W^es ; 275 miles from London (coach road 
227), 4 from New castle-in -Emlyn, 12 ttom Cardi- 
gan. — =- Gt. West. Kail, through Btonehoose, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, 
thence 25 miles : from Derby, throQgh Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 2G6 mil es.-o~- Money order* 
issued at Carmarthen; London letters deliv'- 7 
p.m. : post closea 9 p.m. -a«^ Tlie living (8l. 
Cynllo), a disch"- rectory in the archd'' of Cardi- 
gan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £6. 
I3s. 4d. ; pros, net income, £143; patron, the 
Freeholders : pres. incumb^ut, T. H. Davies, 1835: 
contains 139 houses: pop"- in 1841, 641; ass^ 
propT- £1,554; poor rates in 1838, £239. lla. 
Tithes commuted in 1 839.-«c-There are in thia 
parish three gentlemen's seats ; — the principal one 
is ItroDwydd, the seat of Thomas Davies Lloyd, 
Esq. ; the second is Gunos, the properly of Uiss 

' Judith Parry; the third is Penybaily, the pro- 
perty of John HoweU Davies, Esq. 

LLANOYNLLO (Lowea and Uppbb), Kad- 
NOR, a parish in the bun''- of Kevenlleece, union of 
Knighton, South Wales; 166 miles from Londm 
(coach road 170), 6 from Kuigbton, 10 from New 
Radnor. -«c- Gt. West. Rul. throngh Oxford to 
Worceatcr, thence 48 miles; from Derby, throngh 
Birmingham, Worcester, &c., 119 mile b.-oh~ Money 
orders issued at Presteign: London letters dehv^ 
1 p.m.; post closes 11 a.m.'-K^The school here is 
endowed with £3. 3a. per annnm.-«<>'The living, 
a vicarage in the diocese of St, David's, ie valued ax 
£5. la. Ojd.: pres. net income, £98 : patron, Biahop 
of 81. David's: pre*, incumbent, D. Davies, 1843: 
contains 84 houses: pop^ in 1841, 501: ass^- 
propT- £3,749: poor rates in 1838, £278. 7a. 
Tithes commuted in 1839.-="»-There ore several 
persons residing in the parish on their own pro- 
perty; John Evans, Esq., Treburfa ; John Wur- 
man, Esq. ; GrifGn Lloyd, and Others. 

LLANGYNNOG (or Llinoukhdcr), Cabhu- 
THEK, a parish in the bun"' of Dcrllys, union of 
Carmarthen, South Wales : 239 milus from London 
(coach road 225) , 7 from Carmarthen, 6 from Kid - 
welly.-—- Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 25 
miles: from Derby, throagh Birmingham, Gloa- 
ccBter, &c., 230 miles.-w-Money orders issued at 
Carmarthen: London letters deliv'-^4J p.m.: poet 
closes 9 p.m.— The living (St Cynog) is a cu- 
racy, subordinate to the rectory of Llanstephen : 
contains 169 bouses: pop" in 1841, 800: asa'^ 
prop'- £3,017 : poor rates in 1838, £288. lis. 
LLANGYNNOG, MonaoinBT, a parish in tb« 




hun** and union of Llanfyllin, North Wales : 195 
miles from London (coach road 194), 7 from Llan- 
fyllin, 16 from Llangollen. -o«c:* Nor. West. Kail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewshury to Os- 
westry, thence 1 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 110 mileB.-o»e-Money 
orders issued at Oswestry : London letters deliv**- 
12 J p.m. : post closes at noon.-e*c:^Slate, lead, and 
calamine are found in the parish ; the lead mines 
were formerly very rich. -o»o- The living (St. 
Cynbg), a disch*** rcctoiy in the archd^- and diocese 
of St. Asaph, is valued at £4. 8s. 11 Jd. : pres. net 
income, £126 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : prcs. 
incumbent, John Jones, 1813: pop"- in 1841, 516 : 
poor rates in 1837, £172. 53. Tithes commuted 
in ISdO-^sMs-Fairs : May 6, August 9, and Sep- 
tember 3. 

LLANOYNOG, Brecoii, a parish in the hun*- 
and union of Builth, South Wales : 182 miles from 
London (coach road 177), 4 from Bnilth, 12 from 
Brecon.-o»e«-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 40 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, 
&C-, 178 miles. -o»o- Money orders issued at Builtli : 
London lettei-s deliv^* 3 p.m. : post closes 6. J p.m. 
-3«o-The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^- 
of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's : pres. net 
income, £69 : patron. Bishop of St. David's : pres. 
incumbent, Essex Holcombe: contains 15 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 54: ass** prop^^- £196: poor rates 
in 1838, £32. 13s. 

LLANGTNWYD (or Llangonoyd), Glamob- 
OAN, a parish in the hun^- of Newcastle, union of 
Bridgend and Cowbridge, South Wales : the par- 
ish includes the hamlets of Llangonoyd, Higher 
and Middle, Lower or Bayden, and Cwmdu : 196 
miles from London (coach road 181), 7 from 
Bridgend, 10 from Neath. -o»c-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Bridgend, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 187 miles. -o«c^ 
Money orders issued at Bridgend : London letters 
dcliv^ 1 p.m.: post closes 11 J a.m.-o««^Thcre is 
an Independent chapel here. Ironstone and coal 
are found in the parish.-o«o-The living (St. Cyn- 
wyd), a disch*- vicarage, with the curacy of Bay- 
den, in the archd''* and diocese of Llandaff, is 
Talued at £19. 5s. : prcs. net income, £135: pa- 
tron, J. D. Llewelyn, Esq. : pres. incumbent, R. 
P. Llewelyn, 1841 : contains 306 houses : popl- 
in 1841, i,155: probable pop"- in 1849,4,778: 
ass*- propy- £2,847 : poor rates in 1838, £288. 12s. 

LLANGYNIDER (or Llanouvnider), Brecon, 
ft parish in the hun** and union of Crickhowell, 
South Wales, on the southern bank of the Usk, 
and crossed by the Brecon Canal : the parish in- 
cludes the parcels of Blaine and Dyffryn, and Vro: 
166 miles from London (coach road 160), 7 from 
Crickhowell, 11 from Brecon.-o«:^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 24 miles: frem Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 157 miles.-o«c-Money orders 
issued at Crickhowell: London letters dclivy* 9 
a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o«c-The charities produce 
about £8. lOs. a year.-o««=-The living (St. Cynyd), 
a rectory in the archd'^- of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £13. 4s. 7d. : pres. net 
income, £448: patron, Duke of Beaufort: pres. 
vox. ui. 



incumkn!;, William Davies, 1821 : contains 304 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 2,775: probable pop"- in 
1849, 3,191 : ass^- prop^- £509 : poor ttites in 
1838, £241. 14s.-o^Fairs: April 4, October 20, 
December 7, and the Wednesday next beforo 
Christmas. 

LLANGYNIEW, MoNTGOirERv, a parish in the 
bun*- of Mathrafal, union of Llanfyllin, North 
Wales, on the western bank of the Vyrnewy : 203 
miles from London (coach road 184), 8 from Welsh- 
pool, 3 from Llanfair.-o«ci-Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Welshpool, 
thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Stafford and 
Shrewsbury to Welshpool, &c., 118 miles. -o«o- 
Money orders issued at Welshpool : London letters 
deliv**- at noon : post closes at noon.^=*o-There aro 
traces in the parish of Mathrafal Castle, once the 
residence of the Princes of Powis ; it gave its 
name to the hundred.^3«c.-Tho living (St. Cynyw), 
a rectory in the archd^- and diocese of St. Asaph, 
is valued at £5. 13b. 4d. : pres. net income, £336 : 
patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, T. 
Richards, 1826: contains 124 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 647: ass**- propy- £2,262: poor rates in 
1838, £275. 139. 

LLANHAMLACH. See Llah-Aml-Llech. 

LLANHARAN, GTiAMOROAN, a parish in the 
bun*- of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bridge, South Wales : 192 miles from London (coach 
road 177), 6 from Cowbridge, 3 from Bridgend. 
-e«ca-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Bridgend, thence 3 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
183 miles.-o«<s-Money orders issued at Cowbridge; 
London letters deliv^- at noon : post closes at noon. 
-©•o-Tho parochial charities produce about £12 a 
year.-o«=^The living (St. Juliers and St. Aaron) is 
a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of Llanilid : 
contains 58 houses: pop"- in 1841 , 306: ass**- prop^- 
£1,257: poor rates in 1837, £158. 4s. 

LLANIIARRY, Glamorgan, a parish in the 
bun**- of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bridge, South Wales: 181 miles from London 
(coach road 177), 4 from Cowbridge, 4 from 
Llantrissant.-3«e-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Cowbridge 
road station, thence 1 mile : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c,, 172 miles. «-=»•€*► 
Money orders issued at Cowbridge : London let- 
ters deliv**' 8 J a.m. and 3^ p.m. : post closes 12} 
p.m. and 4J p.m.-o«o-The parochial charities pro- 
duce abijut £10 a year.^3«=^The living (St. Araw), 
a disch'*- rectory In the archd^- and diocese of Llan- 
daff, is valued at £5. 12s. 8}d. : pres. net income, 
£180 : patron, R. H. Jenkins, Esq. : pres. incum- 
bent, John Powell, 1841: pop"- in 1841, 268: 
poor rates, £200. 

LLAN-HAWDEN. See Law-Haden. 

LLANIIENOCK, Monmouth, a parish in tlie 
lower division of the hun^- of Usk, union of New- 
port: 160 miles from London (coach road 146), 2 
from Carlean, 8 from P(mtypool. -cd«3- Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to New- 
port, thence 4 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 151 miles.-o«c^Moncy 
orders issued at Newport : London letters deliv**- 
9i a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o*c*Tlie living (St 
John the Baptist), a per|)etual curacy in the 



LLA 



46 



LLA 



1849, 5,642: poor rates in 1838, £917. 8s. 
Tithes commuted in 1839.-««e-Market day, Satur- 
day. Fairs: last Friday in Jannary, March 17, 
May 31, August 21, November 22.^o«<»-£agle Inn. 
Hand and Royal Hotels. 

LLANOOLMAN, Pembboke, a pansh in the 
hun**' of Kemess, onion of Narbeth, South Wales : 
254 miles f¥om London (coach road 243), 8 from 
• Narbeth, 12 from Cardigan.-o*»-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 40 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 245 miles, -o^o^ 
Money orders issued at Narbeth : London letters 
deliv*- 10 a.m.: post closes 7 J p.m.-o«c>-The living 
(St. Golman) is a perpetual curacy, with that of 
Llandilo, in the archd^* and diocese of St. David's: 
pres. net income, £97: patron, H. W. Bowen^ 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, George Harris : contains 
59 houses: pop»- in 1841, 255: ass*- prop^- £759: 
poor rates in 1838, £91. lis. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANGORSE (Loweb and TJppeb), BBEcoir, a 
parish in the hun** of Talgarth, union of Brecon, 
South Wales : the parish includes Trevinan, and 
part of the township of Llanywem : 169 miles 
from London (coach road 1G8), 7 from Brecon, 
12 from Crickhowell.-o«c^Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
27 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham^ 
Gloucester, &c., 160 miles.-o#o- Money orders is- 
sued at Brecon : London letters deliv*- 10} a.m. : 
post closes 1} p.m.^o«<»-The parochial charities 
produce about £14 a year.-3»o-The living (St. 
Paulinus), a vicarage in the archd^* of Brecon, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £5. 10s. : pres. 
net income, £170: patron, Dean and Chapter of 
Windsor : contains 91 houses : pop^ in 1841, 
397: ass*- propJ^- £1,517: poor rates in 1838, 
£195. 6s. 

LLANGOYEN, Mommocth, a parish in the 
upper division of the hun*- of Ragland, union of 
Monmouth : 149 miles from London (coach road 
136), 4 from Ragland, 7 from Monmouth.«o«c^Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Monmouth, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &o., 140 miles. -«>«»^ 
Money orders issued at Monmouth : London let- 
ters deliv*- 9i a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«*»-The 
parochial charities produce about £13 a year.-«>«»^ 
The living (St. Goven), a perpetual curacy, with 
that of Penclawdd, in the archd^* and diocese of 
Llandaff, is valued at £3. 7s. Id.: pres. net 
income, £120 : patron. Dean and Chapter of 
Llandaff: pres. incumbent, J. Farquhar, 1838: 
contains l,oOO acres: 23 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
136: ass*- prop^- £1,009: poor rates in 1838, £63. 
10s. 

LLANGOWER, Mebioneth, a parish in the 
hun*" of Penllyn, union of Bala, North Wales, on 
the eastern bank of Bala lake: 201 miles from 
London (coach road 197), 3 from Bala, 20 from 
Llanfyllin.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 24 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 116 niiles.-o*c^Money orders issued at 
Corwen : London letters deliv*- noon : post closes 
noon.-oMo-There is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel 
here.-<>«e>-The living (St. Gwyr), a disch*- rectory 



in the archd''* and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued 
at £5. 58. : pres. net income, £136 : patnm, 
Bishop of St. Asaph: pres. incambent, Hugh 
Jones, 1817: contains 89 houses: pop^ in 1841, 
368 : ass*- props'- £1,693 : poor rates in 1838, 
£209. 5s. 

LLANGRANOG, Cabdioav, a parish in tiie 
hun** of Moyddyn, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales : 264 miles from London (coach 
road 225), 10 from Cardigan, 11 from Newcastle, 
■a>& (H. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &&, 255 milee.^o«> Money orders issued at 
Cardigan: London letters deliv*' 8^ a.m. : post 
closes 7i p.m.^o«<»-The living (St. Caranog) is a 
vicarage annexed to Llandissilio-Gogo : contains 
206 houses: pop"^ in 1841, 884: ass*- prop^- 
£1,500: poor rates in 1838, £348. 15s. Tithes 
commuted in 1840.-««o-Fair, May 27. 

LLANGREDIFEL. See Pbnmthod. 

LLANGSTON. See Lanostohe. 

LLANGUA, Monmouth, a parish in the upper 
division of the hun*- of Skenfi^th, union of Dore : 
156 miles from London (coach road 145), 11 from 
Abergavenny, 14 from Monmouth.-e«>-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 14 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 147 mfles. —o" 
Money orders issued at Abergavenny: London 
letters deliv*- 11 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m.^ooe».Th6 
living (St. James), a disch*- rectory in the archdT* 
and ^ocese of Llandaff, is valued at £2. 15s. lOd.: 
pres. net income, £120: patron, J. L. Scudamore: 
pres. incumbent, William E. Sellan, 1846 : con- 
tains 890 acres: 14 houses: pop*** in 1841, 99: 
ass*- propy- £608 : poor rates in 1838, £27. lOs. 

LLANGUICK. See Llan-Ciwo. 

LLANGUINOR. SeeLLANOEiNOB-oN-THB-HiLU. 

LLANGUNNOCH. See Lt.akotnho». 

LLANGWENLLWYFO, Anglesey, a parish in 
the hun** of Twrcelyn, North Wales : the parish 
includes the hamlet of Dulas: 256 miles from 
London (coach road 262), 4 from Amlwch, 6 from 
Llaneroh-y-med. -o**- NcHT. West. Rail, through 
Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Llanfair station, 
thence 14 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
156 miles. o » o Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv^ 10^ a.ffl. : post closes 1} 
p.m.-o«o^The parochial charities produce about £2. 
lOs. per annum.-oM»>Contains 108 houses: pop*- 
in 1841, 594: ass*- prop^- £1,027. 

LLANGWILLOG, Akglesbt, a parish in the 
hun*- of Menai, union of Anglesey, North Wales : 
251 miles fh>m London (coach road 264), 3 fW>m 
Gwindy, 12 from Holybeaa.^=>*ci-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, to Gaerwen 
station, thence 6 miles: from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 151 miles.^e«o-Money orders issued 
at Bangor : London letters deliv*- 10) a.m. : post 
closes 1} p.m.*o*o-There are some trifling cha- 
rities belonging to the parish.^o«<»-Tlie living (St. 
Cwyllog), a perpetual curacy in the aroh^- and 
diocese of Bangor, is valued at £5 : pies, net in- 
come, £90: patron. Sir R. B. W. Bvlkeley, Bart. : 
pres. incumbent, £. Williams, 1837 : contains 42 
houses: pop»- in 1841, 260: ass*- prop^- £729: 
poor rates in 1838, £207. 10s. 



LLA 



47 



I LA 



LI4ANGWM, Dbhbigh, a parisli in the hnn^ of 
Ii- Aled, anion of Corwen, Noxih Wales, on a branch 
of the Dee: 211 milea from London (coach road 
202), 6 from Cerig-j-Dniidion, 8 from Corwen. 
-oM>.Nor. West. Bail, through Wdyerhampton and 
Shrowsbniy to Llangollen, thence 22 miles : from 
Deihy, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 118 
miles , a i cj Money orders issued at Corwen : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ at noon: post closes at noon. 
^o«»-The charities produce about £7 a year.-«Me*. 
The living (St. Heirom) is divided into a sinecure 
rectory, rated at £11. 4s. 7d., gross income, £177; 
and a disch^ vicarage, rated at £6, and returned 
ai £142 gross ; it is in the archd'- and diocese of 
8t Asaph : patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph : popl- 
in 1841, 1,017: poor rates in 1838, £373. 17s. 
Tithes commuted in 1840.^Me^Fair, April 18. 

LLANGWM (IcHA and Ucha), Monmouth, a 
parish in the upper division of the bun'* of Usk, 
union of Chepstow : 148 miles irom London (coach 
mad 139), 4 from Usk, 8 from Chepstow.^e*e^Gt 
West. Bsol. through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
CSiepstow, thence 8 miles: from Derby, through 
Birminghan, Gloucester, &c, 139 miles. -««c^ 
H<moy orders issued at Usk : London letters deliv^- 
9 a.m.: post closes 3} p.m.««M»-The living (St. 
Jerome), a disch^* vicarage in the arehd^* and dio- 
cese of Llandaff, is valued at £4. 10s. 8d. : pros, 
net income, £83 : patron, the Prebendary thereof: 
pies, incombent, John Fleming, 1835: contains 
3,420 acres: 62 houses: poplin 1841,350: ass*'- 
pn^' £2,334: poor rates in 1838, £154. 

LLANGWM, Fembboke, a parish in the hun^ 
of Rhoose, unum of Haverfordwest, South Wales : 
264 miles from London (coach rosid 271), 5 from 
Haverfordwest, 6 from Pembroke.^e«»-Gt. West 
BaiL through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c, 255 miles. 
-«w>-MaDey orders issued at Haverfordwest : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 8} a.m.: post closes 8} p.m. 
-««e*^The living (St. Hierom), a disoh*'- rectory in 
the archd^* and diocese of St David's, is valued at 
27. 12b. lid.: pres. net income, £100: patron, 
Mn. O. Barlow and ^r J. Owen, alternately: 
pees, ineombent, Thomas Williams : contains 131 
houses: pop*** in 1841, 797: aaa^- prop^"- £321: 
poor rates in 1838, £196. lis. Tithes commuted 
hil840. 

LLANGWNODYL (or Llaxowvadle), Cabkab- 
vov, a parish in the hun^ of Comitmaen, union of 
PwUbeti, North Wales: 276 miles from London 
(eoach load 248), 12 Arom PwIlheU, 12 from Neyin. 
*o*o-Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Bangor, thence 38 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 176 miles. -om». Money orders issued 
at Pwllheli: London letters deiiv'^- 1} p.m. : post 
eioses 11 i a.m.-o«»-The church is very ancient. 
There is a Galvinistic Methodist chapel here. The 
parochial charities produce about £10 a year.-e«a^ 
The living (St. Gwynodl) is a perpetual curacy in 
the aichdT^' and diocese of Bangor : pres. net in- 
come, £50: patron. Sir J. S. Piozzi Salusbury, 
Bsrt.: pres. incumbent, John Evans, 1813: con- 
tains 56 houses: pop"*- in 1841, 309; ass*** prop^"- 
£711: poor rates in 1838, £86. 

LLANGWNOB Tor Llamouvnor) , Cabmabthbit, 
a parish in the han^ of Kidwelly, union of Carmar- 



then, South Wales, on the southern bank of the 
Towy : 234 miles from London (coach road 218), 

1 from Carmarthen, 10 from Kidwelly.-oM»-Gf. 
West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 20 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 225 
miles. ^«>M» Money orders Issued at Carmarthen: 
London letters deliv^' 3 p.m. : poet closes 9 a.m. 

o»& The living (St. Cynyr), a disch**- vicarage in 
the archd^- of Carmai-then, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3 : pres. net income, £221 : 
patron. Bishop of St. David's: pres. Incumbent, 
James Griffiths, 1827 : contains 180 houses : pop"* 
in 1841, 1,229: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,413: 
ass**- prop^- £6,041 : poor rates in 1838, £483. 18s. 

LLANGWYFAN, Akolesey, a parish in the 
hun^- of Malltraethr union of Anglesey, North 
Wales : 256 miles from London (coach road 270), 
11 from Llangeffni, 10 from HoIyhead.-«Mo^Nor. 
West. Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and Bangor, 
to Ty-Croes station, thence 2 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 156 miles.^o^^Money orders 
issued at Bangor : London letters deliv**- lOj a.m. : 
post closes Ij p.m.'e«o-The parochial charities 
produce about £29 a year.-o*e^The living (St. 
Cw3nran) is a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of 
TrefdaeUi: contains 40 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
193: ass'*- prop^- £1,292: poor rates in 1838, 
£95. 98. ' Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANGWYFAN, Denbigh, a parish in the 
hun^* and union of Buthiu, North Wales, on a 
branch of the Clydd: 203 miles from London 
(coach road 217), 8 from Buthin, 3 from Denbigh. 
-oM»Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Holywell, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 103 miles.-««o Mone^.orders issued at 
Buthiu: London letters deliv'* 11 a.m.: post closes 

2 p.m.'oco^There is an Independent church here. 
-o«c^The living (St. Cwyvan), a disch**- rectory in 
the deanery of Dyffryn-Clydd, and diocese of Ban- 
gor, is valued at £7. ISs. 9d.: pres. net income, 
£256 : patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
B. L. A. Boberts, 1829 : conteins 51 houses : pop"- 
in 1841, 264: ass^ prop^- £1,266: poor rates in 
1838, £165. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANGWYSTINNYN, Cabnabvon, a parish in 
the hun^ of Creuddyn, union of Conway, North 
Wales : 227 miles from London (coach road 233), 

3 from Conway, 8 from Abergele.-o#o-Nor. West. 
Bail, through Crewe and Chester to Conway, thence 
3 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 127 
miles.-oM»Monev orders issued at Conway : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 3 p.m. : post closes 10 a.m.-o«o. 
The parochial charities produce about £20 a year. 

^■g> The living (St. Constantino) is a perpetual 
curacy in the archd^- and diocese of St Asaph : 
pres. net income, £145: patron. Bishop of St. 
Asaph : pres. incumbent, £. Bobarts, 1846 : popl- 
in 1841, 599 : poor rates in 1838, £319. 

LLANGYBl, Cabnabvov, a parish in the hun^* 
of Evionydd, union of Pwllheli, North Wales : 262 
miles from London (coach road 239), 7 from Pwll- 
heli, 16 from Carnarvon. -o«o. Nor. West. Bail, 
through Crewe and Cliester to Bangor, thence 24 
miles : from Derb}', through Crewe, &c., 162 miles. 
-oM^ Money orders issued at PwllheU: London 
letters deliv**- 12J p.m. : post closes 12J p.m.-***^- 
An Independent church was founded here in 1660. 




W. Price, Esq., erected almslioiises here in 1760, 
the inmates of which each receive £4 a year; the 
other charities prodnce ahont £2. lOs. per annnm. 
-<»«o-The living (St. Cyhi), a rectory, with that of 
Llanarmon, in the archd'* and diocese of Bangor, 
is valued at £15. 3s. 4d. : pres. net income, £450: 
patron, Bishop of Bangor: prea. incumhcnt, St. 
G.A.Williams, 1849: pop**- in 1841,726: poor 
rates in 1838, £185. 128. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANQYBY, Cardigan, a parish in the hun*- 
of Moyddyn, union of Lampeter, South Wales, 
west of the Teifi : 270 miles from London (coach 
road 204), 4 from Lampeter, 7 from Tregaron.-o«c»- 
Gt. West. Kail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, 
and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 20 miles : 
from Derhy, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
261 miles.^oKs- Money orders issued at Lampeter; j 
London letters deliv^* 5 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-o«o-An Independent church was formed here in 
1772; and there are two Calvinistic Methodist 
chapels here.-o#o-The living, a perpetual curacy 
in the archd^- of Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £2: pres.net income, £60: patron, 
Earl of Lishume and Lord Carrington, alternately : 
pres. incumhcnt, M. Williams, 1842 : contains 56 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 274: ass*- prop^- £600: poor 
rates in 1838, £72. 

LLANGYNFELIN, Cabdiqan, a parish in the 
hun*- of Geneur-Glynn, union of Aberystwith, 
South Wales : 244 miles from London (coach road 
217), 6 from Aberystwith, 9 from Towyn.-o»c^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Newtown, thence 34 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewshury, &c., 141 miles.-ow^- 
Money orders issued at Aberystwith : London let- 
ters deliv*- 5^ p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-cwe-There 
are the remains here of the castle of Wyddno, 
which belonged to Gwydno Gwranlin, who is said 
to have lost a considerable space of ground here 
through an inundation of the 8ea.-«3M>-The, living, 
a perpetual curacy in the archd'* of Cardigan, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £6. 13s. 4d. : 
pres. net income, £176 : patron, J. P. B. Chiches- 
ter: pres. incumbent, John Davics, 1849: con- 
tains 190 houses : pop"* in 1841, 642 : ass*- prop'^- 
£1,120: poor rates in 1838, £184. 

LLANGYNHAFAL, Denbigh, a parish in the 
hun*- and union of Ruthin, North Wales: 193 
miles from London (coach road 207), 4 from 
Ruthin, 8 from Denbigh.-s«e-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewshury to Wrex- 
ham-Reg^s, thence 13 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewshury, &c., 115 miles.-««<»Money 
orders issued at Ruthin : London letters deliv** 10 
a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o*o-There is a Calvinistic 
Methodist chapel here. The parochial charities 
produce about £14 a year. -o«c>. The living (St. 
Cynhaval), a disch*- rectory in tlje deanery of 
Dryffin-Clwydd, and diocese of Bangor, is valued 
at £15. 15s.: pres. net income, £407: patron. 
Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, John Jones, 
1831: contains 100 houses: pop"- in 1841, 502: 
ass*- propy- £2,251 : poor rates in 1838, £318. 17fl. 

LLANGYNIN (orLLANDGiNuiNo), Carmabthen, 
a parish in the hun*- of Derllys, union of Carmar- 
then, South Wales, on the river Taff : 242 miles 
from London (coach road 229), 3 from St. Gear's, 



11 from Carmarthen.-oM.-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Giepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 28 miles : from Derhy, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 233 mile8.-««<»Money orders 
issued at St. dear's : London letters deliv** 7 p.m. : 
post closes 9 p.m.-e«oThere are two Independent 
chapels herc-o^a^The living (St. Cynin) is a per- 
petual curacy in the archd^- of Carmarthen, and 
diocese of St. David's: pres. net income, £74: 
patron, J. L. Phillips, Esq.: pres. incumbent, 
Charles Phillips, 1808 : contains 76 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 405: ass*- prop^- £2,063: poor rates in 
1838, £149. 13s.^o«<>-Fair, January 18. 

LLANGYNLLO, Cabdioan, a parish in the hun** 
of Troedyraur, union of Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 
South Wales : 275 miles from London (coach road 
227), 4 from Newcastle-in-Emlyn, 12 from Cardi- 
gan. «o«> Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, 
thence 25 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 266 miles. -e«e» Money orders 
issued at Carmarthen: London letters deliv** 7 
p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. -o»c=- The living (St. 
Cynllo), a disch*- rectory in the arohd'* of Cardi- 
gan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £6. 
13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £148: patron, the 
Freeholders : pres. incumbsnt, T. H. Davics, 1835: 
contains 139 houses : pop*^ in 1841, 641 : ass*- 
prop^* £1,554: poor rates in 1838, £239. lis. 
Tithes commuted in 1839.-oM«-There are in this 
parish three gentlemen's seats : — the principal one 
is Bronwydd, the seat of Thomas Davies Lloyd, 
Esq. ; the second is Gunos, the property of Miss 
Judith Parry; the third is Penybidly, the pro- 
perty of John Howell Davies, Esq. 

LLANGYNLLO (Lower and Uppeb), Rai>- 
xoR, a parish in the hun*' of Kevenlleece, union of 
Knighton, South Wales: 166 miles from London 
(coach road 170), 5 from Knighton, 10 from New 
Radnor. -o»o- Gt. West. Rail, through Oxford to 
Worcester, thence 48 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Worcester, &c., 1 19 miles.-o««*-Money 
orders issued at Presteign : London letters deliv*- 
1 p.m.: post closes 11 a.m.xwe-The school here is 
endowed with £3. 3s. per annum.-<>*c>-The living, 
a vicarage in the diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£5. Is. 0)d. : pres. net income, £98: patron, Bishop 
of St. David's : pros, incumbent, D. Davies, 1843 : 
contains 84 houses: pop"* in 1841, 501: asS** 
propy- £3,749: poor rates in 1838, £278. 7s. 
Tithes commuted in 1839.-«*<»-Thero are several 
persons residing in the parish on their own pro- 
perty : John Evans, Esq., Treburfa ; John Wey- 
man, Esq. ; Griffin Lloyd, and others. 

LLANGYNNOG (or Llahouvhoch), Carmab- 
THEN, a parish in the hun*- of Derllys, union of 
Carmarthen, South Wales : 239 miles from Ltmdon 
(coach road 225), 7 from Carmarthen, 8 from Kid • 
welly .-o*9-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 25 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 230 mileB.-eM>.Money orders issued at 
Carmarthen : London letters deliv** 4^ p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-««»^The living (St. Cynog) is a cu- 
racy, subordinate to the rectory of Llanstephen : 
contains 169 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 800: ass** 
proji^- £3,017 : poor rates in 1838, £288. lis. 

LLANGYNNOG, Montgomebt, a parish in the 



LLA 



hun^ and union of Llanfyllin, North Wales : 195 
miles from London (coach road 194), 7 from Llan- 
fyllin, 16 from Llangollen, -©♦c- Nor. West. Rail. 
tiiFongh AVolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Os- 
westry, thence 1 8 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 110 miles.-3»c^Money 
orders issued at Oswestry : London letters deliv**- 
12j p.m. : post closes at noon.-o«c>-Slate, lead, and 
calamine are found in the parish ; the lead mines 
were formerly very rich. -=>*:^ The living (St. 
Qrribg), a disch*- rectory in the archd''- and diocese 
of SL Asaph, 18 valued at £4. 8s. lljd. : pres. net 
income, £126 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. 
incmnbent, John Jones, 1813: pop°* in 1841, 516 : 
poor rates in 1837, £172. 5s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839.-o«ci^Fairs : May 6, August 9, and Sep- 
tember 3. 

LLANGYNOG, BnEoow, a parish in the hun*- 
and union of Builth, South Wales : 182 miles from 
London (coach road 177), 4 from Builth, 12 from 
Brecon.-o»e.-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 40 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, 
&c., 178 miles. -o«s»Money orders issued at Builth : 
London letters deliv*- 3 p.m. : post closes 6 J p.m. 
-^•o-The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^"- 
of Brecon, and diocese of St. David's : pres. net 
income, £69 : patron, Bishop of St. David's : pres. 
incnmbent, Essex Ilolcombe: contains 15 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 54: ass*- prop^^- £196: poor ratos 
in 1838, £32. ISs. 

LLANGYNWYD (or Llakoonoyd), Glamob- 
OAN, a parish in the hun'- of Newcastle, union of 
Bridgend and Cowbridge, South Wales : the par- 
ish includes the hamlets of Llangonoyd, Higher 
and Middle, Lower or Bayden, and Cwmdu : 196 
miles from London (coach road 181), 7 from 
Bridgend, 10 from Neath. ^»»c^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Bridgend, thence 7 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 187 miles. -=>«c^ 
Money orders issued at Bridgend : London letters 
deliv*- 1 p.m.: post closes 11.J a.m.-o«a-There is 
an Independent chapel here. Ironstone and coal 
are found in the parish.-o*=>-The living (St. Cyn- 
wyd), a disch*- vicarage, with the curacy of Biay- 
den, in the archdy** and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £19. 5s. : pros, net income, £135: pa- 
tron, J. D. Llewelyn, Esq. : pres. incumbent, R. 
P. Llcwelvn, 1841: contains 306 houses: pop"- 
m 1841. '4,155: probable pop"- in 1849,4,778: 
«S8«- prop^- £2,847 : poor rates in 1838, £288. 12s. 

LLANGYNIDER (or Llanounnider) , Buecon, 
a parish in the hun'* and union of Crickhowell, 
South Wales, on the southern bank of the Usk, 
and crossed by the Brecon Canal : the parish in- 
cludes the parcels of Blaine and Dyffryn, and Vro: 
1C6 miles from London (coach road 160), 7 from 
Crickhowell, 11 from Brecon.-5>«o-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 24 miles : frcm Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 157 miles.-o«o-Money orders 
issued at Crickhowell: London letters deliv^' 9 
a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-e«^The charities produce 
about £8. lOs. a year.-o#e-The living (St. Cyuyd), 
a rectory in the archd''' of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £13. 48. 7d. : pres. net 
income, £448: patron, Duke of Boaufort: pres. 

VOL.BI. 



49 LLA 

incumbent, William Davies, 1821 : contains 304 
houses: pop*- in 1841, 2,775: probable pop"- in 
1849, 3,191 : ass**- prop^- £509 : poor tatcs in 
1838, £241. 14s.->.e^Fau-s : April 4, October 20", 
December 7, and the Wednesday next before 
Christmas. 

LLANGYNIEW, Montgomery, a parish in the 
bun*- of Mathrafal, union of Llanfyllin, North 
Wales, on the western bank of the Vyrnewy : 203 
miles from London (coach road 184), 8 from Welsh- 
pool, 3 from Llanfair.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Welshpool, 
thence 8 miles : from Derby, tlirougli Stafford and 
Shrewsbury to Welshpool, &c., 118 miles. -0*01- 
Money orders issued at Welshpool : London letters 
deliv*^- at noon : post closes at noon.^o«ca-There are 
traces in the parish of Mathrafal Castle, once the 
residence of the Princes of Powis; it gave its 
name to the hundred. ^o-o* The living (St. Cynyw), 
a rectory in the archd^^- and diocese of St. Asaph, 
is valued at £5. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £336: 
patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incimibcnt, T. 
Richards, 1826: oontAins 124 houses: pop°- in 
1841, 647: ass**- prop^- £2,262: poor rates in 
1838, £275. 13s. 

LLANHAMLACH. See Llan-Ajil-Llech. 

LLA NH ARAN, Gi^amoroan, a parish in the 
bun'** of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bridge, South Wales : 192 miles from London (coach 
road 177), 6 from Cowbridge, 3 from Bridgend. 
-e«o-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Cliepstow, to Bridgend, thence 3 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
183 miles.-o«c.-Money orders issued at Cowbridge ; 
London letters deliv^* at noon : post closes at noon. 
-o«c:-The parochial charities produce about £12 a 
year.^o«c:-The living (St. Juliers and St. Aaron) is 
a curacy, subordinate to the rectory of Llauilid : 
coTi tains 58 houses: pop"- in 1841 , 306: ass**- prop''* 
£1,257: poor rates in 1837, £158. 4s. 

LLANHARRY, Glamorgan, a parish in the 
hun^- of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bridge, South Wales : 181 miles from London 
(coach road 177), 4 from Cowbridge, 4 from 
Llantrissant.-o»o-Gt. AVest. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Cowbridge 
road station, thence 1 mile : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c,, 172 miles, -©•o- 
Money orders issued at Cowbridge : Liondon let- 
ters deliv**' 8) a.m. and 3^ p.m. : post closes 12} 
p.m. and 4J p.m.-oM>-The parochial charities pro- 
duce about £10 a year.^a»o-The living (St. Araw), 
a disch**- rectory In the archd^- and diocese of Llan- 
daff, is valued at £5. 128. S.^d. : pres. net income, 
£180 : patron, R. H. Jenkins, Esq. : pros, incum- 
bent, John Powell, 1841: pop"- in 1841, 268: 
poor rates, £200. 

LLAN-HAWDEN. See Law-Haden. 

LLANHENOCK, Monmouth, a parish in the 
lower division of the ban*- of Usk, union of New- 
port: 160 miles from London (coach road 146), 2 
from Oai'lean, 8 from Pontypool. -oeo- Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to New- 
port, thence 4 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 151 railes.-«3««=^Monoy 
orders issued at Newport : London letters deliv°- 
9i a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o»c-The living (St, 
John the Baptist), a perpetual curacy in the 



archd^' and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £10 : 
pres. net income, £64 : patron. Dean and Chapter 
of Llandaff: pres. incumbent, Wm. Powell, 1838: 
contains 1,450 acres: 34 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
235: ass^- prop^- £1,242: poor rates in 1838, 
£105. 7s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANHILETH (or Llanhyddell), Monmouth, 
a parish In the upper division of the liun^- of 
Abergavenny, union of Pontypool : 167 miles from 
London (coach road 154), 5 from Pontypool, 12 
from Usk.^3«o-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Newport, thence 11 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 158 
miles. -o*s^ Money orders issued at Pontypool : 
London letters deliv*'* noon : post closes 10^ a.m. 
-o«<=-The living (St. Ilfyd), a.disch^' rectory in the 
arclid^' and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £7. 
15s. 7id. : pres. net income, £109 : patron. Earl 
of Abergavenny: pres. incumbent, James Hughes, 
1843 : contains 2,030 acres : 97 houses : pop"- in 
1841, 662: ass*- prop^"- £1,202: poor rates in 
1838, £160. Is. 

LLANHIR (or Llanyeak), Radnor, a parish in 
the hun*- and union of Rhayader, South Wales, on 
the river Arun: 182 miles from London (coach 
road 181), 7 from Rhayader, 8 from Builth.-o«o- 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Glou- 
cester to Ross, thence 50 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 173 miles. 
-o«c:-Money orders issued at Rhayader: London 
letters deliv'*- 2 p.m. : post closes lOj a.m.-o«>- 
The living is a curacy annexed to the vicarage of 
Nantmel : contains 132 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
746: ass**- prop^- £1,779: poor rates in 1838, 
£268. 18s. 

LLANHOWEL, Pembroke, a parish in the 
hun** of Dcwisland, union of Haverfordwest : 294 
miles from London (coach road 268), 12 from 
Haverfordwest, 5 from St. David's.-o*s^Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 75 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &o., 285 miles. 
-o«c:-Money orders issued at Haverfordwest : Lon- 
don letters deliv'*- 10 a.m. : post closes 7 p.m.-o«=- 
The living (St. Hoel) is a discli**- vicarage an- 
nexed to that of Llandylwyf, or Llandoloy : con- 
tains 38 houses: pop"- in 1841, 160: ass^- prop^- 
£797 : poor rates in 1837, £71. 6s. 

LLANHYCHAN (or Llantchan), Denbigh, a 
parish in the hun*- and union of Ruthin, North 
Wales, on the river Clydd : 202 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 207), 4 from Ruthin, 6 from Den- 
bigh.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton 
and Shrewsbury to Wrexham Regis, thence 15 
miles: from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 117 mile8.-o««^Money orders issued at 
Ruthin : London letters dcliv'^' 9) a.m. : post 
closes 3J p.m.-o»c:*The living (St. Hychan), a 
disch**- rectory in the deanery of Dyffryn-Clwyd, 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £7. 17s. 6d. : 
pres. net income, £170: patron, Bishop of Ban- 
gor : pres. incumbent, Wm. Williams, 1844 : con- 
tains 17 houses: pop"- in 1841, 111 : poor rates 
in 1838, £102. 9s. 

LLANIDAN, Anqlesey, a parish in the hun*** 
of Menai, union of Carnarvon, North Wales : the 
parish includes the chapclry of Llanfair yn-y- 
Cwmmwd: 246 miles from London (coach road 



253), 4 from Carnarvon, 8 from Bangor.-o*=^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Ci'ewe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
146 mile8.-o«c:-Money orders issued at Carnarvon: 
London letters deliv^* 3J p.m.: post closes 10 
a.m. -«=•«► The church was erected in 616. Some 
trifling charities belong to the parish. There are 
extensive remains of the structures of the Druids 
here, who were massacred here in the years 67 and 
76.-o«o-The living (St. Aidan), a vicarage with 
the curacies of Llanddaniel-Fab, Llanedwen, and 
Llanfair-y-Cwmmwd, in the archd'* of Anglesey, 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £10: pres. net 
income, £292 : pati-on, Lord Boston : pres. incum- 
bent, R. Rice Hughes: contains 268 houses: pop*** 
in 1841, 1,370: probable pop». in 1849, 1575: 
ass^ prop'- £2,151 : poor rates in 1838, £512. 
18s.-o«s^Plas Newydd, in this parish, is one of the 
residences of the Marquis of Anglesey, whose 
principal seat is Beaudesert, in Staffordshire — 
which see for genealogy and family history. The 
mansion is an unimposing structure, but is situa- 
ted in a very beautiful park. 

LLANIDLOES, Montgomery, a parish, borough, 
and market town, in the hun^- of Llanidloes, onion 
of Newton and Llanidloes : the parish, besides the 
borough, comprises the townships of Kilmarham, 
Manleth, Birthdir, Treflyn, and Cross-Lloybin : 
226 miles from London (coach road 188), 14 from 
Newtown.-o«es-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 14 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, 
&c., 121 miles. -ok:^ Money orders issued here: 
London letters deliv^- 2 J p.m. : post closes 8J a.m. 
^•c>"Llanidlocs is situated in a pleasant vale, 
watered by the river Severn, over which there are 
here two bridges, one of them a handsome stone 
structure, of three arches, and is surrounded by 
high hills on every side. It consists of two prin- 
cipal streets, which cross each other at right an- 
gles, having several inferior ones branching from 
them in various directions. Until within the last 
half century the town presented the aspect of one 
of those old places which took their building date 
from the time of the Tudors, but the lath and mud 
houses, with their toppling roofs, have, in most of 
the chief places, given way to erections of a more 
substantial kind. The church is noted for its roof 
of curiously carved oak. The town-house or hall, 
which occupies a central position, is a large bmld- 
ing formed in the old framework style. In the 
vicinity of the town there are several handsome 
residences, but Llanidloes also derives an advan- 
tage from the circumstance that tourists who de- 
sire to explore the great mountain of Plinlimmon, 
generally take their departure for that purpose 
from here. The principal manufacture of this 
town is that of flannel, which has been extensively 
carried on from a remote period, and there are 
therefore several fulling mills and factories for 
carding and spinning the wooL The flannel is in 
high repute, and during the process of its manu- 
facture, fills as many as nearly a thousand looms, 
the quantity made being between 9,000 and 10,000 
pieces. Besides this business, however, there are 
a number of tan-yards about the town, flour mills, 
and malt kilns ; in fact it forms the centre of a 
considerable district, for which it is the chief depot 



of the ordinary itecessarieB of life. The Baptists, 
Independents, Wesleyan and Calyinistio Metho- 
dists all have chapels here. The parochial cha- 
rities prodnce ahont £63 per annnm. No corporate 
charter was discoTered in the course of the mnni- 
dpal inqniry, bnt Llanidloes appears to have been 
a borongh by prescription from a Tery remote 
period, the county magistrates having the legal 
jurisdiction of the place. By Ihe municipal act it 
is gOTemed by four aldermen and twelve council- 
lon; they have a public income of about £130 a 
yetr. l^his town was formerly a contributory 
borough with Montgomery, a privilege which was 
restored to it by the Reform Act, after it had been 
a century in abeyance.-«Mo-The living (St. Idloes), 
a disch'- vicaimge in the archd''* and diocese of 
Bangor, is valued at £4. 3s. 4d. : patron, Bishop 
of ^ngor : pres. incumbent, Evan Pughe, 1837 : 
contains 780 houses: pop** in 1841, 4,261 : pro- 
bable pop"- in 1849, 4,900: ass*- prop^- £6,176: 
poor ntes in 1838, £2,484. 3s.^»«e^Market day, 
Saturday. Fairs: Saturday before first Tuesday 
iQ February, Saturday before last Tuesday in 
March, May 11, June 22, July 17, second Satur- 
day in September, first Friday in October, October 
22, December 14. 

LLANIESTYN, Anolesby, a parish partly in 
the hun^ of Tindaethwy, and partly in the borough 
of Beaumaris, union of Bangor and Beaumaris, 
North Wales : 249 miles from London (coach road 
264), 14 from Gwindy, 3 from Beaumaris-^o^ai- 
Nor. West. Bail, through Crewe, Chester, and 
Bangor, to Llanfair station, thence 7 miles : from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c, 149 miles.^o«e^Money 
orders issued at Gwindy: London letters deliv^* 
1 p.m.: post doses 11 a.m.-o«>The living (St. 
Testyn), a curacy subordinate to that of Llangoed : 
contains 63 houses: pop"- in 1841, 276: ass** 
piop3^' £313: poor rates in 1837, £104. 16s. 

LLANIESTYN, Caknabvon, a parish in the 
hnn^- of Dinllaen and Gafflogian, union of Pwllheli, 
North Wales : 273 miles from London (coach road 
251), 8 from Pwllheli, 6 from Nevin.-=«<^Nor. 
West. Bail, through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, 
thence 36 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
173 miles.-a«»-Money orders issued at Pwllheli : 
London letters deliv^- 12} p.m. : poet closes 12} 
p.m.^eMo-The living (St. Testyn), a rectory, with 
the curacies of Llandegwiming and Penllech, in 
the archd''* and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £21. 
3s. 9d. : pres. not income, £696 : patron, Bishop 
of Bangor: pres. incumbent, Robert Jones, 1824 : 
contains 227 houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,090: ass*^ 
prop^- £2,319: poor rates in 1838, £232. 9s. 
Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANIGON, Brecoh, a parish in the hnn'* of 
Talgarth, union of Hay, South Wales : the parish 
includes the hamlet of Glyn-Vach: 160 miles 
from London (coach road 168), 2 from Hay, 14 
firom Crickhowell. -o«»- Gr. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, thence 28 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 161 miles. q« c Money orders 
issued at Hay : London letters deliv'^' 10} a.m. : 
post closes 1 p.m.-o«o-The living (St. Eigen), a 
diseh'- vicarage in the diocese of St. David^s, is 
valued at £7. 12s. 8}d. : pres. net income, £202 : 
pttnm, Lord Chancellor: pres. incumbent, W. de 



Winton, 1809: contains 130 houses: pop"* in 
1841, £547: ass*- prop^- £2,695: poor rates in 
1838, £228. 9s.^o«>Lhinigon House: Okefield 
House. 

LLANILAR (Lower and Uppbr), Cardtoan, a 
parish in the hun**- of liar, union of Aberystwith, 
South Wales : 247 miles from London (coach road 
211), 8 from Aberystwith : 10 from Tregaron. 
-^•©►Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 40 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford and Shrewsbury, &c., 
162 miles. -ove^Money orders issued at Aberyst- 
with : London letters deliv^* 6 p.m. : post closes 9 
p.m.-o«<>-The charities produce about £14 a year. 
-a«c^The living (St. Hilary), a disch**- vicarage in 
the archd^. of Brecon and diocese of St. David's, is 
valued at £6. ISs. 4d. : pres. net income, £96: 
patron. Bishop of St. David's : pres. incumbent, 
P. Felix: contains 197 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
1,010: ass*- prop^- £1,300: poor rates in 1838, 
£432. 4s. 

LLANILLID, Glahoroan, a parish in the hun^ 
of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cowbridge, 
South Wales : 1 93 miles from London (eoach road 
177), 5 from Cowbridge, 5 from Bridgend.-o«5^Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Cowbridge Road station, thence 4 
miles : from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 184 miles. -o»> Money orders 
issued at Cowbridge: London letters deliv^- at 
noon : post doses at noon.^e«>The charities pro- 
duce about £3 a year.-c>«>Tho living (St. Hid), a 
disch** rectory, with the curacy of Llanharan an- 
nexed, in the archd^- and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £7.- 16s. 7}d. : pres. net income, £253: 
patron, Lord Chancellor: pres. incumbent, T. 
Morgan Davies, 1848 : contains 26 houses: pop^ 
in 1841, 148: ass*** prop^* £937: poor rates in 
1837, £92. 4s. 

LLANILLITERN, Glauoroan, a parochial 
chapelry in the hun**' of Dinas-Powis — (which see 
for access, &c.) — South Wales: 166 miles from 
London : 6 from Cardiff, 6 from Caerphilly.-o«&- 
Money orders issued at Cardiff: London letters 
deliv*' lOj a.m. : post closes 1} p.m.-s>«»-The 
living (St. nityd), a curacy subordinate to the 
rectory of St. Fagan : contains 23 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 136: ass*^ propJ^- £727: poor rates in 



1838, £149. 2s. 
LLAN-ILLTYD. 



See luTOK, Glamoroak- 



SH1RE. 

LLAN-ILLTYD. See Laktwit, Glamorgan- 
shire. 

LLANINA, Cardigan, a parish in the hun^- of 
Moyddyn, union of Abcmeron, South Wales : 285 
miles from London (coach road 226), 16 from 
Lampeter, 16 from Cardigan.-o»o-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Llandeilo-Vawr, thence 35 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 276 
miles.-o*»-Money orders issued at Lampeter: Lon- 
don letters deliv* 8 p.m. : post closes 7 p.m.^o«c»- 
The Uving (St. Iiia), a curacy subordinate to 
Llanarth vicarage : contains 104 houses : pop"' in 
1841, 447: ass'*- piopy- £700: poor rates in 1838, 
£119. 9s. 

LLANIO, Cardigan, a township in the parish 
of Llanddewi-Brefi — (which see for access, &c.) — 



LLA 



52 



LLA 



South Wales: 219 miles from London, 8 from 
Lampeter, 4 from Tregaron. -o-o- Money orders 
issued at Lampeter: London letters dcUv'*' 6 p.m.: 
post closes. 8 p.m.-o«c-This was the Roman station 
called Loventium, and relics of those who lived 
here have frequently been met with.*o*e^Contaifa8 
24 houses : pop"- in 1841, 131 : poor rates in 1838, 
JC36. 

LLANISAN (or Llanishab), Glamorgan, a par- 
ish in the hun**- of Ribbor, union of Cardiff, South 
Wales : 173 miles from London (coach road 164), 
4 from Cardiff, 3 from Caerphilly.-o»o-GH;. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Cardiff, thence 4 miles: fh}m Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 164 
miles.^<M<> Money orders issued at Cardiff: Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 10 a.m. : post closes 2 p.m.^s«c^ 
The parochial charities produce about £20 a year. 
-«>*<»-The living (St. Isan), a perpetual curacy in 
the archd^' of Llandaff, is valued at £10 : pres. net 
income £46: patrons, Earl of Plymouth and C. 
K. K. Tynte, Esq., alternately: pres. incumbent, 
Benjamin Jones, 1820: contains 58 houses: pop*^* 
in 1841, 418: ass^- prop^. £1,920: poor rates in 
1838, £206. 9s. 

LLANISHEN, MozniouTH, a parish in the upper 
division of the hun^- of Ragland, union of Mon- 
mouth : 149 miles from London (coach road 136), 
7 from Monmouth, 8 from Chepstow.-o«o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Mon- 
mouth, thence 7 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 140 iniles.-o««»- 
Money orders issued at Monmouth: London letters 
deliv^- 9 a.m. : post closes 6 p.m.-««o-The charities 
produce about £22 a year.-o«<»-The living (St. 
Denis), a perpetual curacy in the archd''* and dio- 
cese of Llandaff, is valued at £3. lis. Ojd. : pres. 
net income, £64 : patron, Duke of Beaufort : pres. 
incumbent. H. Warrilow, 1831 : contains 1,570 
acres: 60 houses: pop"- in 1841, 307: ass**- prop^- 
£927 : poor rates in 1837, £76. 18s. Tithes com- 
muted. 

LLANITHOG. Hereford, an extra-parochial 
place in the hun** of Wormelow. -o«o-Contains 40 
acres: pop"- in 1841, 17. 

LLANLLAWDDOG, Caruabthen, a parish in 
the bun**' of Elvet, union of Carmarthen, South 
Wales: 262 miles from London (coach road 
213), 8 from Carmarthen, 16 from Lampe- 
ter. -o«o^ Gt. West Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Vawr, 
thence 12 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c., 253 miles.-oM»-Moncy 
orders issued at Carmarthen : London letters deliv^- 
4 J p.m.: post closes 8 p.m.-oeo-There is a Cal- 
vinistic Methodist chapel here.-o*»-The living (St, 
Llawddog), a perpetual curacy, with that of Llan- 
pump-Saint, in the archd^* of Carmarthen and dio- 
cese of St. David's, is valued at £5 : pres. net m- 
come, £150: patron. Vicar of Abergwille: pres. 
incumbent, W. H. Powell : contains 141 houses : 
pop»»- in 1841, 779: ass*- prop^- £2,038: poor rates 
in 1838. £200. 9s. 

LIiANLLAWER, Peubroke, a parish in the 
bun**- of Kemess, union of Haverfordwest: 279 
miles from London (coach road 256), 3 from Fish- 
guard« 6 from Newport.-o«e-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swan- 



sea, thence 65 miles : from Derby, through Bir* 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 270 ndles.^owa*Money 
orders issued at Haverfordwest: London letters 
deliv*' 8i a.m. : post closes 3^ p.m.-e^o-There are 
some Druidical remains, and a mineral spring in 
the parish.-o«»-The .living is a curacy, annexed to 
the rectory of Llanychilwyddog : contains 24 
houses: pop"- in 1841,114: ass*- prop^- £418: 
poor rates in 1838, £39. 15s. 

LLANLLECHED, Carnabvov, a parish in the 
bun*- of Uchaf, union of Bangor and Beaumaris, 
North Wales : 243 miles from London (coach road 
252), 5 from Bangor, 10 from Camarvon.-oao-Nor. 
West. Rail, through Crewe and Chejiter to Bangor, 
thence 5 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
r43 mi les.-o«> Money orders issued at Bangor: 
London letters deliv*- 8) a.m. : post closes 5} p.m. 
-oM»>The charities produce about £29 a year. 
There are extensive quarries of slate, which give 
large employment to the inhabitants.--o«=>-The liv- 
ing (St. Lleched), a rectory in the arohd'^- and dio- 
cese of Bangor, is valued at £15. 13s. 4d. : pres. 
net income, £471 : patron. Bishop of Bangor : 
pres. incumbent, J. H. Cotton, 1821 : contains 
563 houses : pop"* in 1841, 4,957 : probable popl- 
in 1849, 5,700 : ass*- prop^- £3,294 : poor rates in 
1837, £693. 148.-=.^Fair, October 8. 

LLANLLEONWELL, Brecoh, a parish in the 
bun*- and union of Builtfa, South Wales : the par- 
ish includes the hamlet of Gwaravog : 183 miles 
from London, 10 from Builth, 12 from Rhayader. 
-oec-Gt. West. Rail, through Oxford to Worcester, 
thence 65 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Worcester, &c., 136 miles.*o«€^ Money orders 
issued at B^th : London letters deliv** 4} p.m. : 
post closes 5 p.m.-ooo-The living, a perpetual cu- 
racy in the archd^* of Brecon, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £2. 138. 4d. : pres. net in- 
come, £60: patron. Bishop of St. David's: pres. 
incumbent, Henry Morgan, 1846: contains 38 
houses: pop»- in 1841, 261: ass*- prop^- £986 : 
poor rates in 1838, £75. 9s. 

LLANLLIBIO, Akolesey, a chapelry in the 
parish of Llantrisaint — (which see for access, &c.) 
— North Wales : 269 miles from London, 6 from 
Gwindy, 8 from Holyhead.-o«o-Money orders is- 
sued at Bangor : London letters deliv*- 11 a.m. : 
post closes 1 p.m.-oMa-The living is a curacy, sub- 
ordinate to the rectory of Llantrisaint : contains 
15 houses: pop"- in 1841, 87: ass*- prop^- £353: 
poor rates in 1838, £41. 8s. 

LLANLLOWELL, Mosmottth, a parish in the 
upper division of the bun*- of Usk, union of Pont- 
y-pool, on the eastern bank of the Usk : 155 miles 
from London (coach road 144), 2 from Usk, 12 
from Chep8tow.-3«=*Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Chepstow, thence 12 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester 
to Chepstow, &c., 143 miles.-«>M».Moncy orders is- 
sued at Usk : London letters deliv*- 8} a.m. : post 
closes 4 p.m.-«>«>-The living, a rectory in the 
archd^- and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £2. 
13s. l^d.: pres. net income, £130 : patron, Rev. 
J. A. Williams : pres. incumbent, J. A. Williams, 
1831 : contains 820 acres : 16 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 109 : poor rates in 1837, £39. lOs. 

LLANLUGAN (or Llahlioan), MoNraoHERT, 
a parish in the bun** of Newtown, union of New- 




town Bnd LlanidloeB, North Wales, on the river 
Rhm : 209 miles from London (c4J&ch road 180), 
12 fit)m Welshpool, 12 from Montgomery.-o»o- 
Nor. West. Rail, through WoWerhampton and 
Shrewsbniy to Welshpool, thence 12 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 124 
miles.-oM»Money orders issued at Welshpool: Lon- 
don letters delxv^ 1 p.m. : post closes 11 a.m.^oM>i> 
A honse of Cistertian nuns was founded here in 
1239.-o«=-The living (St. Mary), a perpetual cu- 
racy In the archd'^' and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £10 : pres. net income, £49 : patrons, 
Lords of the Manor : pres. incumbent, J. A. Her- 
bert, 1836: contains 70 houses: pop^ in 1841, 
413: ass^ prop^^- £1,139: poor rates in 1838, 
£174. lOs. 

LLANLLWCH, Cabmabthek, a chapelry in the 
{urish of St. Peter, borough of Carmarthen — (which 
see for access, &c.) — South Wales : 219 miles from 
London, 1 from Carmarthen, 7 from St. Clare.-o«a> 
Uuney orders issued at Carmarthen : London let- 
ters deliv*- 3 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-o«o-The 
liTing, a perpetual curacy in the archd'* of Car- 
marthen, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
10b.: pres. net income, £120: patron, Bishop of 
St David's : pres. incumbent, T. Williams, 1844. 

LLANL.LWCHAIABN, Cardigak, a parish in 
the hun**- of Moyddyn, union of Aberaeron, South 
Wales: 262 miles from London (coach road 211), 
15 firom Alieraeron, 4 from Aberystwith.-o^s^Nor. 
West. RalL through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bory to Newtown, thence 45 miles : from Derby, 
Enough Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 167 miles.^o«> 
Money orders issued at Aberystwith : London let- 
ters cteliv^ 12 J p.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-oM>.The 
living (St. Llwchaiam) is a rectory in the archd^' 
of Cudigan, and diocese of St. David's : pres. net 
income, £140 : patron. Bishop of St. David's : pres. 
incumbent, David Evans, 1838: contains 254 
houses: pop°* in 1841, 1,475: probable pop'^ in 
1849,1,696: ass*- prop^- £1,170: poor rates in 
1838, £281. 198. 

LLANLLWCHAIARN, Montgohebt, a parish 
in the bun** of Newtown, union of Newtown and 
Llanidloes, North Wales, on the river Severn, and 
crossed by the Montgomery Canal : the parish in- 
dudes the townships of Aberbechan with Gwestyd, 
and Hendidley with Kilcowen: 209 miles from 
London (coach road 175), 2 from Newtown, 7 from 
Montgomery .-ows-Nor. West. Bail, through Wol- 
verhampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 
2 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, Shrews- 
bury, &C., 124 miles.-oM»Money orders issued at 
Newtown: London letters deliv** 10 a.m. : post 
closes at noon.-o«e»The manufacture of woollen 
cloths is carried on to a considerable extent in the 
parish.-oM»-The living (St Llwchaiam) , a disch** 
vicarage in the archd'* and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £7. 7s. 6d. : pres. net income, £355 : 
patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, C. 
Wingfield, ISiitX) : contains 375 houses : pop*** in 
1841,3,616: probable pop»- in 1849. 3,600: ass*- 
propy- £3,682 : poor rates in 1838, £705. 18s.^«.^ 
There are two gentlemen's seats in this parish : 
one, named Dolem, the residence of William Luke- 
nor, Esq. ; the other, Mitfbrd House, the residence 
of the Rev. John P. Drew. 

LLANLLOONY, Cabiiabtren, a parish in the 



bun*- of Cethiniog, union of Lampeter, South Wales: 
266 miles from London (coach road 219), 16 from 
Carmarthen, 8 from Lampeter.-o«o-Gt. West. RaiL 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Llandeilo-Vawr, thence 16 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 257 miles. 
-o»c-Money orders issued at Carmarthen : London 
letters deliv*- 6j p.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-o««^The 
living (St. Llonio), a disch** vicarage, with the 
curacy of Llanvihangel-Rhosycom, in the archd^' 
of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £5 : pres. net income, £103 : patron. Bishop of 
St. David's: pres. incumbent, Rd. Davies, 1847: 
contains 157 houses: pop"- in 1841, 908: ass** 
propJ^- £1,780 : poor rates in 1838, £392. 

LLANLLYFFNI, Carnahvon, a parish in the 
hun*- of Uweh-Gorfai, union of Carnarvon, North 
Wales, on the river Llyffhi : 252 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 241), 7 from Carnarvon, 8 fh>m 
Tremadoc.-o#o-Nor. West. Rail, through (>ewe and 
Chester to Bangor, thence 14 miles: from Derby, 
through Crewe, &o., 152 miles.-«=»«e>-Money orders 
issued at Carnarvon: London letters deliv** 4} 
p.m. : post closes 9 a.m.-o«=-There is a Calvinistic 
Methodist chapel here. The scenery in the neigh- 
bourhood, especially in Neath Glen, where Edward 
I. had a lodge, is remarkably picturesque. Slate, 
manganese, and copper, are found in the parish. 
-3«s-The living (St. Rhedyw), a disch** rectory in 
the arohd^- and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£7. 17s. 6d. : pres. net income, £240 : patron, 
Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, John Jones, 
1819: contains 316 houses : pop"*- in 1841, 2,017: 
probable pop*- in 1849, 2,320 : ass*- prop^- £2,532 : 
poor rates in 1838, d&471. 10s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LLANMADOC, Glahoroan, a parish in the 
bun*- and union of Swansea, South Wales, at the 
month of the river Burry : 228 miles from London 
(coach road 220), 14 from Swansea, 16 from 
Llanelly.-e^o-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 14 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 219 mile8.-oM9>Money orders issued at 
Swansea : London letters deliv^ 6^ p.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-«»*si-The living (St. Madoc), a rectory 
in the archd^- of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £9: pres. net income, £112: 
patron, Lord Chancellor : pres. incumbent. Pressor 
Pearee, 1835 : contains 53 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
269 : ass*^- prop^- £505 : poor rates in 1838, £18. 

188. 

LLANMAES, Glamoroak, a parish in the 
hun^- of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bi-idge. South Wales: 186 miles from London 
(coach road 177), 4 from Cowbridge, 16 from Car- 
diff.-e«>-Gt West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Cowbridge road station, 
thence 8 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 177 mile8.-o«<=-Money orders is- 
sued at Cowbridge: London letters deliv*^ 11} 
a.m. : post closes 12} p.m.-o«c>-There are the re- 
mains here of a castle which anciently belonged to 
the Mellifont family. In the parish register there 
are the records of the deaths of Joan Yorath, who 
died in 1621 at the age of 180, and of Elisabeth 
Yorath, who was buried in 1668, who lived to be 
177 years old.^3«c9-The living (St. Cadocus), a rec- 



toiy in the archd^^* and diocese of LlandafT, is 
valaed at £10. 2b. S^d. : pres. not income, £294 : 
patron, Marquis of Bute: contains 40 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 194: ass*- prop^- £1,063: poor 
rates in 1837, £155. 188. 

LLANMAREWIC, Montoomebt, a parish in 
the hun**- of Newton, North Wales, on the sonth- 
eastem bank of the Sevcm : 210 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 173), 3 from Newtown, 5 from 
Montgomery.^3«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wol- 
yerhampton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, tiience 3 
miles : from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, 
&c., 125 mile8.-o«=-Money orders issued at New- 
town : London letters dcliv** 1 p.m. : post closes 
llj a.m.-o«c-The living (St. llwchaiam), a disch*- 
rectory in the archd^- and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £6. 13s. 9d. : pres. net income, £143: 
patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, J. 
Lloyd, 1844 : contains 33 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
167 : ass*»- prop^- £869 : poor rates in 1838, £102. 
19s. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANMARTEN, Monmouth, a parish in the 
lower division of the hund*** of Caldicot, union of 
Newport: the parish includes the hamlet of Lande- 
vand: 162 miles from London (coach road 141), 
6 from Newport, 11 from Chep8tow.-««e»-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Newport, thence 6 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 153 
miles.'OMi^Money orders issued at Newport : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 9^ a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.^e>«> 
This parish is entitled to send two pensioners to 
the almshouses at Chepstow. There is a Calvinis- 
tic Methodist chapel here. -«•«»- The living (St. 
Martin), a disch*- rectory, united to that of Wil- 
crick, in the archd^^- and diocese of Llandaif, is 
valued at £4. 6s. lO^d. : pres. net income, £250 : 
patron, T. Perry, Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. Cal- 
lowhill, 1814: contains 1,060 acres: 29 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 162: ass*- prop^^- £1,272: poor rates 
in 1838, £50. 18s. 

LLANNEFYDD (or Llah-Upydd), Denbigh, a 
parish in the bun*- of Isaled, union of St. Asaph, 
North Wales, on the river Aled : 220 miles from 
London (coach road 217), 7 from Denbigh, 6 from 
St. Asaph. -o«o- Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe 
and Chester to Abergele, thence 7 miles : from 
Derby, through Crewe, &c., 120 miles. -o*©- Money 
orders issued at Denbigh: London letters deliv*** 
10 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.^o^i^The living, a 
disch*^' vicarage in the archd^* and diocese of St. 
Asaph, is valued at £10 : pres. net income, £228 : 
patron, Bishop of St Asaph: pres. incumbent, 
John Roberts, 1843 : contains 214 houses : pop"* 
in 1841, £1,196: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,375: 
ass**- prop'^- £4,665: poor rates in 1838, £594. Is. 
«oM>- Fairs: March 18, May 12, August 14, Nov. 
20, for cattle. 

LLANNON, Caruautden, a parish in the hnn^* 
of Camwallan, union of Llanelly, South Wales: 
the parish includes the hamlets of Poleyne, Glyn, 
Goytre, and Ismorlais: 230 miles from London 
(coach road 220), 16 from Swansea, 6 from Llan- 
elly. -om*^ Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llanelly, thence 6 
miles: firom Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 221 miles, -o^o- Money orders 
issuad at Swansea : London letters deliv^- 6 p.m. : 



post closes 8 p.in.-o*>>TheTe are some valuable 
iron and coal mines in the parish.-o«*'The living 
(St. Non), a perpetual curacy in the archd'* of 
Carmarthen and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £6. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £86 : patron, 
R. G. Thomas, Esq.: pres. incumbent, £. Morris, 
1815: contains 304 houses : pop"- in 1841, 1,769: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 2,034 : ass**- prop^- £5,299 : 
poor rates in 1838, £646. 9s.-«>M».Fair : December 
10, for cattle, horses and pedlery. 

LLANNOR (Lanfawr), Carnarvon, a parish in 
the hun^- of Dinlaen and GafHogian, union of 
Pwllheli, North Wales: 266 miles from London 
(coach load 247), 4 from Pwllheli, 18 from Car- 
narvon.-<Me>^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester to Bangor, thence 28 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 166 mile8.-o*e-Money orders 
issued at Pwllheli: London letters deliv'* llj 
a.m. : post closes 1) p.m.-o«o>There are two Cal- 
vinistic Methodist chapels here. The charities 
produce about £14 a year.-o«»-The living (the 
Holy Cross), a disch^- vicarage, with the curacies 
of Denio and Pwllheli : present net income, £230: 
patron, Bishop of Bangor: pres. incumbent, 
Thomas Jones: contains 1849 acres: 229 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1227: probable pop", in 1849, 
1,411: ass'*- prop^- £3,765: poor rates in 1838, 
£342. 19s. 

LL AN OYER, Monmouth, a parish in the upper 
division of the hun*^* and union of Abergavenny, 
on the river Usk: 157 miles from London (coach 
road 145), 4 from Abergavenny, 7 from Ponty- 
pool."c>K»^Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse and 
Gloucester to Chepstow, thence 17 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 148 
miles. -ow^Money orders issued at Abergavenny: 
London letters deliv*^ 8| a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
^oMs^The Independents and Calvinistic Metlio- 
dists have places of worship here. One of the 
schools here is supported by an endowment be- 
queathed by Mrs. Sarah Hopkins, of £3,000 
govei-nment stock, and the rent of a small farm, 
which produces £15 per annum. The other cha- 
rities produce about £3 a year.-oM»^The living, a 
disch*^- vicarage in the archd^- and diocese of 
LlandafT, is valued at £15. 38. 6d. : pres. net in> 
come, £591 : patron, Dean and Chapter of LUn* 
daff: pres. incumbent, John Evans, 1843: con- 
tains 4,800 acres: 414 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
3,123: probable pop"- in 1849, 3,691 : ass^- prop^- 
£2,480 : poor rates in 1838, £312. 128.-o«a-Llan- 
over House. 

LLANRHAIADAR - IN - EINMERCH, Dbn- 
BioH, a parish in the hun*'* of Isaled, union of 
Ruthin, North Wales, on a branch of the Clydd : 
205 miles from London (coach road 208), 3 from 
Denbigh, 9 from St. Asaph.-«*»-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Wrexham Reg^s, thence 18 miles: from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 120 miles.-««»- 
Money orders issued at Denbigh : Ixmdon letters 
deliv^' 9 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.«oM>^Tbere are 
three Calvinistic Methodist chapels here. One of 
the schools here has an endowment of about £7 
per annum. Almshouses were founded and en- 
dowed in the village in 1722, by Mrs. Sarah Jones, 
for eight poor persons, each of whom receives £1 
monthly. Wlicn the report of the charity com- 




miflsionera was made, the roTenttes of tbe bequest 
produced £181 per annam ; what became of the 
sorplns is not stated. The other charities produce 
about £62. 10s. a year.-s«e-The living (St. Dyv- 
Dog), a yicarage in the deanery of Dyffryn-Clywd, 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £28. 138. 4d. : 
pres. net income, £609 : patron, Bishcl]^ of Ban- 
gor: pres. incumbent, Richard Howard, 1843: 
contains 405 houses : pop"* in 1841, 2,039 : pro- 
bable pop"- in 1849, 2,345: ass^ props'- £9,428 : 
poor rates in 1837, £1,737. 7s.^-c-Fair, Oct. 17.' 
LLANRH AT ADAR - Y - MOCHNANT, Dbk- 
BioH, a parish in the hun'* of Chirk, union of 
lianfyllin. North Wales, on the river Tanat: 191 
miles from London (coach road 182), 6 from Lian- 
fyllin, 12 from Llangollen.-o*>-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Llan- 
gollen, thence 12 miles: from Derby,' through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 106 mile8.^o«o>Money 
orders issued &t Oswestry : London letters deliv*^ 
noon: post doses 12^ p.m.^-Mc^The village stands 
OQ a small eminence, and has a handsome church, 
with an elegant east window, filled with stained 
glass, the subject being the ^* Root of Jesse.'' The 
patriarch is represented as extended on his back, 
with the genealogical tree issuing from his loins, 
comprising all the monarchs of Israel and Judah, 
down to the advent of our Saviour ; the branches 
encircling the kings are covered with diversified 
foliage. The colours are remarkably brilliant, and 
fonn a beautiful decoration to the church, bringing 
to mind those beautiful lines of Bishop Lowth, 
written when he was almost a boy, on Winchester 
college chapel : — 

"Thy Btrokes, great wrtiat, so sablime appear, 
Ther cheek our pleasare with an awful fear, 
While through uie mortal line the God you traoe, 
Author himself, and heir of Jesse's race ; 
la laptorea we admire thy bold design, 
And, as the snbject, own the hand divine. 
While throQgh thy work the rising day shall stream, 
So long shall last thine honour, praiseu and name ; 
And oh ! till earth and seas, and heavn decay, 
Ne'er may that ftir creation fsde away : 
May winds and storms those beauteous colours spare, 
Still may they bloom, as permanent as fair, 
All the vain rsge of wasting time repel, 
And His tribunal see whoae erosv they paint so well.** 

There is a Oalvinistic Methodist chapel here. One 
of the schools here is endowed with £20 per an- 
mun ; the other charities produce about £90 per 
lannm. In the neighbourhood is Pistyle Rhaiadar, 
the finest waterfall m North Wales.^o«o^The liv- 
ing (St. Dogvan), a vicarage in the archd^' and 
diocese of 8t. Asaph, is valued at £9. 38. 4d. : 
pres. net income, £520: patron, Bishop of St. 
Asaph : pres. incumbent, Walter Davis : contains 
450 houses: pop*^* in 1841, 2,620: probable pop*^ 
m 1849, 3,013 : ass^ prop^- £5,435 : poor rates in 
1838, £461. 4s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANRHIAN, Pehbhoke, a parish in the 
hnn^ of Dewisland, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales: 279 miles from London (coach road 269), 
12 from Fishguard, 5 from St David's.-^>*9-Gt. 
West Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 65 miles.-o^O' Money 
orders issued at Haverfordwest: London letters 
deliV'- 9 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. -o^a- Extensive 
fllate quarries lately opened, called Abereithy, 
Porthgain, Trwyullwyd. A pier has been erected 
at Porthgain, available for vessels in distress at 



high water.-o«o-The living (St. Rheanus) , a disch*- 
vicarage in the archd^- of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £12. 138. 4d. : pres. net 
income, £105: patron, Bishop of St. David's: 
pres. incumbent, Jacob Hughes, 1844: contains 
264 houses: pop"- in 1841, 912: ass**- prop''- 



£2,741 : poor rates in 1838, £336. 128.-»«=-Tre- 
vaccoon is the seat of John Hardinge Harries, 
Esq. 

LLANRHIDIAN (Hioher and Loweb), Gla- 
UOROAN, a parish in the hun"^* and union of Swan- 
sea, South Wales: 224 miles from London (coach 
road 216), 10 from Swansea, 7 from Lloughor.^««>- 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, 
and Chepstow, to Swansea, tlience 10 miles : from 
I>erby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 215 
miles.-o*o-Money orders issued at Swansea : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 4J p.m. : post doses 9 p.m.-o*=- 
On an eminence commanding the Burry, stand the 
ruins of Weobly Castle. Arthur's Stone is a huge 
mass of about twenty tons weight, raised upon 
supporters about five feet in height, and beneath 
there is a well which ebbs and flows with the tide. 
Copper ore, limestone, and freestone, are wrought 
in the parish.-o»o-The living (St Illtyd), a disch**- 
vicarage with the curacies of Llanyurwd, and Pen* 
clawdd, in the archd''* of Brecon, and diocese of 
St. David'8, is valued at £12. 13s. 4d. : pres. net 
income, £99: patron. Trustees of G. Morgan, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. James : contains 264 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,760: probable pop"* in 
1849, 2,024 : ass*- prop^- £2,741 : poor rates in 
1838, £336. 12B.^-«^Fair, Palm Monday. 

LLANRHYCHWYN, Caknarvon, a parish in 
the hun*- of Nant-Conway, union of Llanrwst, 
North Wales, on the river Conwy : 250 miles from 
London (coach road 241), 4 from Llanrwst, 10 from 
Bangor.-o«o^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Chester to Bangor, thence 12 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 150 miles.-o«o-Money orders 
issued at Conway : London letters deliv*- 2} p.m. : 
post closes 4} p.m.*'9«o.-There are some extensive 
quarries of slate in the parish.-o«o-Tbe living (St. 
Rhychwyn) is a curacy subordinate to the rectory 
of Trefriw: contains 113 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
551 : ass** prop^- £810: poor rates in 1838, £250. 
14s. 

LLANRH YDD, Denbtoh, a parish in the bun** 
and union of Ruthin, North Wales, which extends 
into the borough of that name, and with which the 
principal returns are g^ven : 193 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 206), 8 from Ruthin, 13 from 
Llangollen.-e^o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Llangollen, thence 
13 miles : from Derby, through Stafibrd, Shrews- 
bury, &c., 108 miles.-o«5^ Money orders issued at 
Ruthin : London letters deliv** 1 1 a.m. : post closes 
2 p.m.-o*s-The living is a rectory annexed to Ru- 
thin: contains 16 houses: pop"- in 1841,840: 
ass*- propy- £1,007 : poor rates in 1838, £415. lis. 

LLANRHYDDLAD, Akglksrt, a parish in the 
bun*- of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey: 269 
miles from London (coach road 276), 11 from 
Gwindy, 6 from Holyhead.-o««-Nor. West Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, thence 6 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 169 milcp. 
-aM»>Money orders issued at Bangor : London let- 
ters deliv*' 12^ p.m. : post closes 11^ a.m.-e*o^ 




There is a Methodist chapel here. The parochial 
charities produce ahout £33 a 7ear.^o«ci>The livizig 
(St. Khyddlad), a disch**- rectory, with the curacies 
of Llanfflewin and Lllanrhwydrus, in the aichd^* 
of Anglesey, and diocese of Bangor, is valued at 
£14. lis. 3d. : pres. net income, £530: patron, 
Bishop of Bangor : ppes. incumbent, Jas. Hughes, 
1843 : contains 134 houses : pop"*- in 1841, 725 : 
ass^- prop'-' £1,207 : poor rates in 1838, £207. ISs. 

LLANKHYSTYD, Cardigan, a parish in the 
lower division of the hun'^* of liar, union of Aber- 
ystwith, South Wales, on the coast of the Irish 
sea : the parish includes the townships of Hami- 
niog and Mevenidd : 247 miles from London (coach 
road 227), 8 from Aberystwitb, 16 from Lampe- 
ter. -o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton 
and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 40 miles : 
from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c, 
162 miles. -o^s^Money orders issued at Aberyst- 
witb : London letters deliv*- 6i p.m. : post closes 
8 p.m.-^=-The living (St. Rhystyd), a disch**- 
vicarage in the archd^* of Cardigan, and diocese of 
St. David's, is valued at £6. 13s. 4d. : pres. net 
income, £140: patron. Bishop of St David's: 
pres. incumbent, John Lewis, 1834: contains 336 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,608: probable pop"- in 
1849, £1,849: ass**- prop^- £3,210: poor rates in 
1838, £397. 178. Tithes commuted in 1839.->«^ 
Fairs : Thursday before Easter, and Thursday be- 
fore Christmas. 

LLANRHYWYDRUS, Akglesky, a parish in 
the bun**- of Tal-y-Bolion, union of Anglesey, 
North Wales : 279 miles from London (coach road 
276), 12 from Gwindy, 14 from Holyhead.-=«c^ 
Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester to 
Holyhead, thence 14 miles : from Derby, through 
Crewe, &c., 179 miles. ^3«c- Money orders issued at 
Bangor: London letters deliv'*- 12 J p.m.: post 
closes 11} a.m.-o<ic>-The living is a curacy, subor- 
dinate to the rectory of Llanrhyddlad : contains 
34 houses: pop"- in 1841, 158 : ass**- prop^- £608: 
poor rates in 1838, £126. 4s. 

LLANROTHALL, Hekeford, a parish in the 
lower division of the bun**- of Womielow, union of 
Monmouth, on the river Monnow : 147 miles from 
London (coach road 129), 5 from Monmouth, 9 
from Ros8.-o«3-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 5 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 138 
miles. -«•»- Money orders issued at Monmouth : 
^■Mo-London letters deliv^* 8} a.m. : post closes 5} 
p.m.-o*o>The charities produce about £3 per an- 
num.-o*»-The living, a disch*- vicarage in the 
archd'* and diocese of Hereford, is valued at £3. 
15s. 5d. : pres. net income, £206 : patron, Jos. 
Price, Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. D. Watherston, 
1848: contains 1,740 acres: 21 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 108 : ass^- prop?-- £1,380 : poor rates in 1837, 
£47. 12s. 

LLANRUG. See Llakfihanqel-in-Ruo. 

LLANRWST, Denbigh, a parish and market 
town in the bun'* of Isdulas, union of Llanrwst, 
North Wales, on the bank of the river Conwy : 
the parish includes the townships of Garthgarmon 
and Tybrith-Uchaf : 235 miles from London (coach 
road 218), 12 from Conway .-o«c»-Nor. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Conway, thence 12 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 135 miles. 



xMc^Money orders issued at Conway : London let- 
ters deliv"- 9 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«<=^The 
town is situated in one of the most beautiful and 
picturesque valleys in North Wales, surrounded 
by every variety of landscape effect, and its dis- 
trict studded with the residences of the gentry, 
who hav9 been attracted by the beauty of the 
place. - The church has a beautiful lateral chapel, 
built after a design by Inigo Jones. W^ithin the 
church is preserved the stone coffin, in which the 
body of Llewellyn, the last prince of Wales, was 
interred. Over the river there is a fine bridge of 
three arches, which was also designed by Inigo 
Jones. The Independents, Baptists, and Calvinis- 
tic Methodists, all have chapels here. An alms- 
house and free school were founded a|^d endowed 
in 1610, by Sir John Wynne: the other chari- 
ties produce about £35 a year. Lead ore of the 
purest quality is raised in the vale. This is one 
of the polling-places for the county. The Llan- 
rwst poor-law union comprises seventeen parishes, 
or parts of parishes, maintaining their own poor, 
with a population of about 12,000 pcrsous.-o«o- 
The living (St. Grwst) , a rectory in the archd^^- 
and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £18. 58. 5d.: 
pres. net income, £700 : patron. Bishop of St. 
Asaph: pros, incumbent, T. G. Roberts, 1830: 
contains 787 houses : pop"- in 1841,3,905: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 4,491: ass**- prop^- £4,042: 
poor rates in 1838, £1,655. 10s.^3*<=^Markct days, 
Tuesday and Saturday. Fairs : first Tuesday in 
February, March 8, April 25, June 21, August 10, 
Sept. 17, Oct. 25, Dec. 11, and second Tuesday 
after that day. -o«c^ Bankers: North and South 
Wales Bank'— draw on London and Westminster 
Bank.-o*»-Gwydir, one of the seats of Lord Wil- 
loughby de Eresby, is in the parish of Llanrwst 
His lordship's principal scat is at Grimsthorpe in 
Lincolnshire, which see for genealogy and family 
history. 

LLANRYTHAN, Pembroke, a parish in the 
hun^- of Dewisland, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales: 277 miles from London (coach road 265), 
10 from Haverfordwest, 9 from St. David*s.-«K3- 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, 
and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 63 miles: firom 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 268 
miles.-o»<=^Money orders issued at Haverfordwest : 
London letters deliv^- 9} a.m. : post closes 7^ p.m. 
o»» The living is a perpetual curacy in the dio- 
cese of St David's : pres. net income, £86 : patron, 
Vicars Choral of St. David's: pres. incumbent, 
Jacob Hughes : contains 35 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
182 : ass*- prop^- £612: poor rates in 1838, £50. 
16s. 

LLANSADWRN, Anglesey, a parish in the 
bun*- of Tyndaethwy, union of Bangor and Beau- 
maris, North Wales : 245 miles from London (coach 
road 254), 4 from Menai Bridge, 3 from Beaumaris. 
-«o«o-Nor. West Rail, through Crewe, Chester, and 
Bangor, to Llanfair, thence 4 miles : from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 145 mileB.-o»e-Money orders 
issued at Bangor : London letters deliv'- 8 a.m. : 
post closes 5 p.m.-o*:^The living (St Sadwm) , a 
disch''- rectory in the archd*'"- and diocese of Ban- 
gor, is valued at £7. 6s. OJd. : pres. net income, 
£381 : patron, Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, 
John Roberts, 1845: contains 63 houses: pop"- in 




Bishop of St. Asaph: pros, lucambent, Walter 
Jones, 1827: containa 332 houses: pop*** in 1841, 
2,083 : probable pop"- in 1849, 2,395 : ass^^ propi'- 
£9,233 : poor rates in 1838, £463. 14& 

LLANiSOY, a parish in the upper division of the 
hun^ of Ragland, union of Chepstow : 150 miles 
from London (coach road 138), 10 from Chepstow, 
9 from Monmouth.-«Me>-Gt. West Bail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Chepstow, thenoe 10 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 141 nules. -om>^ Money orders 
issued at Chepstow: London letters deliv^* 10^ 
a.m. : post closes 3} p.m.-««»-The parochial chari- 
ties pxx)duce about £14 a year.^o^a^The living; a 
disch^- rectory in the archd^- and diocese of Llan- 
Tlafi^ is valued at £6. tOs. lOd. : pros, net income, 
£170: patron, Duke of Beaufort: pros, incumbent, 
R. M. Evanson, 1849 : contains 1,240 acres ; 29 
houses : pop"* in 1841, 158 : ass^ prop)^- £1,583 : 
poor rates in 1838, £74. 3s. 

LLANSPYDTHID, Brecon, a parish in the 
hon^ of Devynock, union of Brecon, South Wales, 
on the southern bank of the Usk : the parish in- 
cludes the hamlets of Modrydd and Pen-Pont: 177 
miles from London (coach road 174), 3 from Bre- 
con, 17 from Builth.^3.c^Gt West Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thenoe 
35 miles : from Derby, through Binningham and 
Gloucester, &c., 168 miles.-o«c»Money orders issued 
at Brecon: London letters deliv^* 9^ a.m. : post 
closes 2j^ p.m.-«Mc>-Some trifling charities belong 
to the parish, and it has a right to send pensioners 
to Games's hospital, at Brecon.-o«=.>Tbe living (St. 
Cattwc) , a disch*^- vicarage in the archd^' of Brecon 
and diocese of St David's, is valued at £5. 17s. 
Bjd.: pres. net income, £100: patron. Marquis 
Camden: pres. incumbent, J. M. Downes, 1847: 
sontains 96 houses: pop"* in 1841, 482: ass^* 
prop^- £3,492: poor rates in 1837, £371. 128. 

LLANSTADWELL, Pemdbokb, a parish in the 
hun^ of Rhoose, union of Pembroke, South Wales, 
on the northern bank of Milford Haven: 259 miles 
from London, 4 from Pembroke.-o«c>-Gt. West 
Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 45 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 250 
miles.«o«>Money orders issued at Hobb's Point. 
«o«c>-The living (St Tudwal), a disch*^* vicarage in 
the archd^' and diocese of St David's, is valued at 
£7. 17s. : pres. net income, £94 : patron, Lewis 
Child, Esq.: pres. incumbent, Thomas Owen, 
1813: contains 138 houses: pop*^- in 1841,833: 
ass^ propy- £2,283 : poor rates in 1837, £309. 5e. 

LLANSTEPHAN, Cabmabthen, a parish in the 
hnn^ of Derllys, union of Carmarthen, South 
Wales, at the mouth of the river Towy : 239 miles 
from London ^oach road 226), 8 from Carmar- 
then, 6 from Kidwelly.-««e»Gt West Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 25 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c., 230 miles-^oMs-Monuy 
orders issued at Carmarthen: London letters deliv*'* 
4} p.m.: post doses 8 p.m.-«3M>-There are an Inde- 
pendent and a Calvinistic Methodist chapel in the 
'village.-«*o-The living (St Stephen), a perpetual 
curacy, with that of Uangunnock, in the archd^- 
of Carmarthen and diocese of St David's, is valued 
at £8. 13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £101 : patrons, 



Messrs. Morris, and W. Lloyd, Esq. : pres. incum- 
bent, Benjamin Evans, 1843: contains 274 houses: 
pop»- in 1841, 1,253: probable pop^- in 1849, 
1,440: ass<i- prop^"- £4,357: poor rates in 1838, 
£674. 16s. 

LLANSTEPHAN, Radnor, a parish in the hun<^ 
of Pains Castle, union of Hay, South Wales, on 
the Wye: 157 miles from London (coach road 
164), 8 from Hay, 7 fix>m Builth.-3«:-Gr. West 
RaU.' through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, 
thence 35 miles: from Derby, through Binningham 
and Gloucester, &c., 148 miles. -e>«o>Money orders 
issued at Hay: London letters deliv*^ at noon: 
post closes Hi a.m.-o*o-The living (St. Stephen), a 
perpetual curacy, in the archd^- of Radnor and 
diocese of St David's, is valued at £9 : pres. net 
income, £67 : patron. Bishop of St. David's : con- 
tains 52 houses: pop"* in 1841, 261 : aas**- prop^- 
£1,214: poor iiates in 1838, £102. 6s. 

LLANSTINAN, Pembroke, a parish in the hun^ 
of Dewisland, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales: 279 miles from London (coach road 257), 
3 from Fishguard, 7 from Newport.-o»c^Gt West 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 65 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &o., 270 
miles. -o»o- Money orders issued at Haverford- 
west: London letters deliv^ 8i:a.m.: post closes 
3} p.m.^3«»"The living (St. Justinian), a perpetual 
curacy in the archd'* and diocese of St. David's, is 
valued at £4: pres. net income, £100: patron, 
Colonel Owen: pres. incumbent, W. C. Bowcn: 
1847: contains 26 houses: pop""- in 1841, 170: 
ass^^ props'- £803: poor rates in 1837, £47. 10s. 

LLANTHETTY. See Li^andetty. 

LLANTHEWY-BYTHERCH, Monmouth, a 
parish in the lower division of the hun**- and union 
of Abergavenny, on a branch of the Trothy: 153 
miles from London (coach road 140), 4 from Aber- 
gavenny, 11 from Monmouth.*o«c>.<Tt. West Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 11 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c, 144 mLleB.-oM:>^Money 
orders issued at Abergavenny: London letters 
deliv^- 8i a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o«c>^Thc chari- 
ties produce about £3 per annum.-oM^The living 
(St. David), a vicarage in the archd'^- and diocese 
of Llandaff, is valued at £7. 15s. 5^d.: pres. net 
income, £1 95 : patron. Lord Chancellor : pres. in- 
cumbent, W. Davics, 1819: contains 2,260 acres: 
71 houses: pop"- in 1841, 361: ass*^- prop^- £2,314: 
poor rates in 1838, £215. 7s. Tithes commuted 
in 1840. 

LLANTHEWY-SKIRRIT, Monkouth, a parish 
in the lower division of the hun*^' and union of 
Abergavenny: 141 miles from London, 9 from 
Usk.-o«ck'(For access and postal arrangements see 
above. )-<e*c-The living, a rectory in the archd'"* 
and diocese of LlandatiT, is valued at £7. 10s. 2;^d.: 
pros, not income, £187 : patron, Rev. M. H. Jones: 
pres. incumbent, M. H. Jones, 1833 : contains 891 
acres: 22 houses: pop"* in 1841, 105: ass^- prop^^* 
£373 : poor rates in 1838, £44. 4s. Tithes com- 
muted in 1839. 

LLANTHEWY-VACH, Monmouth, a parish in 
the lower division of the bun'* of Usk, union of Pont- 
y-pool: 146 miles from London (coach road 146), 
5 from Caerleon, 5 from Pont-y-pool.-o«o.Gt West 



the upper division of the hun^- and anion of Aber- 
gavenny, north of the Usk : 153 miles from Lon- 
don (co«ach road 140), 4 from Abergavenny, 11 
from Monmouth, -ok^ Gt. West. RaiL through 
Stonehousc and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
11 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c. 144 mile8.^9*c*Money ordem issued at 
Abergavenny: London letters deliv*** 8J a.m. : 
post closes 4 p.m.-='«o-The liviftg, a disch*** rectory 
in the archd^* and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at 
£2. 136. ll^d. : prcs. net income, £73: patron, 
Mrs. Jones : pres. incumbent, John I. Jones, 1812 : 
contains 290 acres: 4 houses: pop*^- in 1841, 20: 
ass**- prop'^- £313: poor rates in 1838, £6. 3s. 

LLANSAMLET (Higher and Lower), Gl\- 
uoROAN, a parish in the hun^' of Llangefelach, 
union of Neath, ^uth Wales, on the oastom bank 
of the Tawe, and crossed by the Swansea Canal : 
211 miles from London (coach road 203), 4 from 
Swansea, 5 from Neath. «o«> Gt. West. Bail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Neath, thence 5 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 202 mi]os.-o«e>-Money 
orders issued at Swansea: London letters deliv"- 
3 p.m. : post closes 9 a.m.-c>K»The principal fea- 
ture of the parish is its large copper- works, situated 
in the lower division, which have been the means 
of destroying the vegetation in that division almost 
entirely. The firms are, Messrs. Pascoe Grenfell 
& Sons, and Messrs. Freeman & Co. It is also full 
of coal-works. The principal landed proprietor is 
the Earl of Jersey, and the principal coal lease- 
holder is Charles Henry Smith, Esq. of Derwcn- 
fawr, near Swansea. This gentleman, as well as 
his ancestors for the last century, resided at the 
principal seat in the parish, called Gwernllwyn- 
nehith, till within the last fow years. Tho length 
of the parish is about 5 miles by 3, upon an aver- 
age. Its boundary, all the way to tho north and 
west, is the river Tame. There is a canal in the 
lower division, of about three miles in length, be- 
longing exclusively to Mr. Smith, in order to con- 
vey his coal to the copper-works and the port of 
Swansea. -=>«c>-The living (St. Samled), a perpetual 
curacy with that of Kilvey, in the archd*'- of Bre- 
con, and diocoso of St. David's, is valued at £12: 
pres. net income, £150: patron, Bishop of St. 
David's : pres. incumbent, M. R. Morgan, 1842 : 
contains 642 houses: pop"- in 1841, 3,375: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 3,881 : poor rates in 1838, £737. 

LLANSANNAN, Den bioh, a parish in the hnn^- 
of Isalcd, union of St. Asaph, North Wales : 235 
miles from London (coach road 222) , 9 from Den- 
bigh, 12 from Conway. -o«>- Nor. West. Kail, 
through Crewe and Cliester to Conway, thence 12 
miles : from Derby, through Crowe, &c., 135 miles. 
^3*c>.Monoy orders issued at Denbigh: London 
letters deliv^ 10ia.m.: post closes 2 J p.m.-o«€>- 
There arc Independent, Baptist, and Calvinistic 
Methodist chapels here.*»«»-The living (St. San- 
nao) is a vicarage in the archd^- and diocese of St. 
Asaph: prcs. net income, £376: patron. Bishop 
of St. Asaph: pres. incumbent, P. Williams, 184G: 
contains 282 houses: pop"- in 1841,1,406: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 1,617: ass**- prop^- £5,534: 
poor rates in 1837, £090. 23. Tithes commuted 
in 1840.-=e<=-Fair8: May 18, August 17 and 27, 
October 26, and November 30, for cattle. 



LLANSANNWR, Glauoroait, a parish in the 
hun**- of Cowbridge, union of Bridgend and Cow- 
bridge, South Wales, on the small river Sannwr, 
which flows into the Bristol Channel : 182 miles 
from London (coach road 174), 2 from Cowbridge, 
9 from Bridgend«-o«si^ Gt. West. Hail, throngh 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Cow- 
bridge rood, thenco 2 miles : from Derby, throu^ 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 173 miles. «>& 
Money orders issued at Cowbridge: London let- 
ters deli v^ 11 a.m. : poet closes 1 p.m. o»c a The 
living (St Senewyr), a disch^- rectory in the 
archd^' and diocese d Llandaff, is valued at £7. 
15s. 7id. : pres. net income, £105 : patron, Joseph 
Bailey, Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. Griffith, 1846 : 
contains 34 houses: pop"- in 1841, 204: ajsa'* 
propr- £1,391 : poor rates in 1838, £99. 68. 

LLANSANTFFREAD, Gardioah, a parish in 
the lower division of the hun**- of Ilor, union of 
Abcrayron, South Wales, on Cardigan bay: the 
parish includes the hamlet of Llan-non: 242 miles 
from London (coach road 225),' 13 from Aberyst- 
with, 14 from Lampeter. -<o«c^ Nor. West. Roil. 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to New- 
town, thence 35 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford and Shrewsbury, &c., 157 niile8.*«>««»-Moiiey 
orders issued at Aberystwith: London letters 
deliv''- 7^ p.m. : post closes 8 p.m. o >c . There is a 
C^dvinistic Methodist chapel heTe.-o««>-The living 
(St. Bridget), a disch^- vicarage in tho archd^- of 
Cardigan and ^ocese of St. David's, is volQed st 
£6. 13s. 4d.: pres. net income, £91: patron, Bishc^ 
of St. David's: pres. incumbent, Wm. Herbert, 
1836: contains 240 houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,222: 
probable pop**- in 1849, 1,405: ass*- prop^- £2,370 : 
poor rates in 1838, £388. 12s. 

LLANSAKVEL, Cabmabtben, a village in the 
hun**- of Cayo, union of Llandeilo-Vawr, South 
Wales, on the river Cothy: 260 miles from London 
(coach rood 202), 11 from Llandovery, 9 from 
Lampeter.^<Mc>>Gr. West. BaiL through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Yawr, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Birmiiig^ 
ham and Gloucester, &a, 151 miles.-o«»-Moiieir 
orders issued at Llandovery: London letters deliv^* 
2} p.m.: post closes 9) a.m.-<»*c»The living, a 
vicarage subordinate to that of Convil-Gayo: con- 
tains 190 houses: pop*^- in 1841, 982: ass* prop''' 
£3,715: poor rates in 1838, £470. l8.^>«a-Market 
day, Friday. Fairs: First Friday after May 12, 
cattle ; July 26, October 23, cattle, horses. 

LLANSILIN (near Oswestry), Dbmbioh, m 
parish in the bun*- of Chirk, in the above county. 
North Wales : it includes the township of Soagh- 
ton or Sychton, in the bun** of Oswestry, ooiinty 
of Salop: 182 miles from London (coach road 
176), 6 from Oswestry, 10 from L]angoUen.-«Mc»- 
Nor. West. Kail, through Wolverhampton and 
Slirewsbury to Oswestry, thence 6 miles: from 
Derby, through Stafford and Shrewsbury", &c., 97 
miles.-e*o-Moncy orders issued at Oswestry: Lon- 
don letters deliv** 10 a.m.: post closes 2^ p.m. 
-oM»>The parochial charities produce about £19 per 
annum ; and there is, besides, a weekly distribn. 
tion of bread to the poor. There is an Independent 
chapel in the village.-««>-The living (St. Giles), a 
vicarage in the archd'* and diocese of St. Asaph, is 
valued at £8: prcs. net income, £307: patron. 




Bishop of St. Aaaph: pros, incmnbent, Walter 
Jones, 1827: contains 332 houses: pop^' in 1841, 
2,083 : probable pop^ in 1849, 2,395 : ass*^ prop)'- 
£9,233 : poor rates in 1838, £463. 14s. 

LLANiSOY, a parish in the upper division of the 
hnn^ of Bagland, union of Chepstow : 150 miles 
from London (coach road 138), 10 from Chepstow, 
9 from Monmonth.-o«»»Gt. West. Kail, through 
Stonehonse and Gloucester to Chepstow, thence 10 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 141 miles. -om>^ Money orders 
issued at Chepstow: London letters doliy^- 10^ 
a.m.: post closes 3} p.m.-««»-The parochial chari- 
ties produce about £14 a year.-o*ei^The living; a 
disch'- rectory in the archd^- and diocese of Llaa- 
Baff, is valued at £6. tOs. lOd. : pres. net income, 
£170: patron, Duke of Beaufort: pres. incumbent, 
R. M. Evanson, 1849: conUins 1,240 acres: 29 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 158: ass^ prop'^* £1,583 : 
poor rates in 1838, £74. 3s. 

LLANSPYDTHID, Breoov, a parish in the 
ban'- of Devynock, union of Brecon, South Wales, 
on the southern bank of the Usk : the parish in- 
cludes the hamlets of Modrydd and Pen-Pont: 177 
miles from London (coach road 174), 3 from Bre- 
con, 17 from Builth.^a»e>>Gt. West. Rail, through 
Btonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
35 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 168 miles.-e«c»Money orders issued 
at Brecon: London letters deliv^- 9 J a.m. : post 
doses 2} p.m.-«Mc>-Some trifling charities belong 
to the parish, and it has a right to send pensioners 
to Games's hospital, at Brecon.-oK>-The living (St. 
Cattwc) , a disch*'' vicarage in the archd^- of Brecon 
and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £5. 17s. 
8}d.: prea. net income, £100: patron, Marquis 
Camden : pres. incumbent, J. M. Downes, 1847 : 
contains 96 houses: pop^- in 1841, 482: ass^* 
prop^- £3,492: poor rates in 1837, £371. 12s. 

LLANSTADWELL, Poibbokb, a parish in the 
hun*^ of Rhooee, union of Pembroke, South Wales, 
oa the northern bank of Milford Haven: 259 miles 
from London, 4 from Pembroke.-o«c>-Gt. West. 
Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 45 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 250 
mile8.^a«c»Money orders issued at Hobb's Point, 
-o«>The living (St Tudwal), a disch*^- vicarage in 
the archd^' and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£7. 17s. : pres. net income, £94 : patron, I^ewis 
Child, Esq.: pres. incumbent, Thomas Owen, 
1813: contains 138 houses: pop**- in 1841, 833: 
ass^ prop^- £2,283 : poor rates in 1837, £309. 5s. 

LLANSTEPHAN, Cabmabthen, a parish in the 
faun^ of Derllys, union of Carmarthen, South 
Wales, at the moutb of the river Towy: 239 miles 
from London (coach road 226), 8 from Carmar- 
then, 6 from Kidweily.^o«a-Gt. West Bail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 25 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c., 230 miles.-««c>^Money 
orders issued at Carmarthen: London letters deliv^- 
4} p.m.: post closes 8 p.m.«o«>There are an Inde- 
pendent and a Calvinistic Methodist chapel in the 
vilJage.-o*o-The living (St Stephen), a perpetual 
curacy, with that of Llangunnock, in the archd^- 
of Cannarthen and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £8. 138. 4d. : pres. net income, £101 : patrons, 



Mossrs. Morris, and W. Lloyd, Esq. : pres. incum- 
bent, Benjamin Evans, 1843: contains 274 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1,253: probable pop"* in 1849, 
1,440: ass*'- prop^"* £4,357: poor rates in 1838, 
£674. 16s. 

LLANSTEPHAN, Badnor, a parish in the hun<>' 
of Pains Castle, union of Hay, South Wales, on 
the Wye: 157 miles from London (coach road 
164), 8 fhmi Hay, 7 fh>m Builth.«3«>Gr. West 
Bail.' through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, 
thence 35 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &c, 148 miles.-e>«o>Money orders 
issued at Hay: London letters deliv*^- at noon: 
post doses 111 a.m.-o*o-The living (St. Stephen), a 
perpetual curacy, in the archd'* of Hadnor and 
diocese of St David's, is valued at £9 : pres. net 
income, £07 : patron, Bishop of St. David's : con- 
tains 52 houses: pop^* in 1841, 261 : ass*** prop^- 
£1,214: poor rates in 1838, £102. 6s. 

LLANSTINAN, pEunttoxE, a parish in the hun^ 
of Dewisland, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales: 279 miles from London (coach road 257), 
3 from Fishguard, 7 from Newport.-o«c.-Gt. West 
Bui. through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 65 miles : f^m Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &o., 270 
miles. -090- Money orders issued at Haverford- 
west : London letters deliv^- 8^ a.m. : post closes 
3i p.m.-«Mo^The living (St. Justinian), a perpetual 
curacy in the arcfad^' and diooeBe of St David's, is 
valued at £4: pres. net income, £100: patrofi. 
Colonel Owen: pres. incumbent, W. C. Bowen: 
1847: contams 26 houses: pop"- in 1841, 170: 
asB^ props'- £803: poor rates in 1837, £47. 10s. 

LLANTHETTY. See Llandetty. 

LLANTHEWY-RYTHERCH, Monmouth, a 
parish in the lower division of the bun*** and union 
of Abergavenny, on a branch of the Trothy: 153 
miles from London (coach road 140), 4 from Aber- 
gavenny, 11 from Monmouth.«oK»<lt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 11 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham and Gloucester, &c, 144 mileB.^o«<»-Money 
orders issued at Abergavenny: London letters 
deliv^' 8} a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.^o^^Thc chari- 
ties produce about £3 per annum.-oM^The living 
(St. David), a vicarage in the archd'^' and diocese 
of Llandaff, is valued at £7. 15s. 5^.: pres. net 
income, £195: patron. Lord Chancellor: pres. in- 
cumbent, W. Davics, 1819: contains 2,260 acres: 
71 houses: pop°in 1841, 361: ass*'- prop^- £2,314: 
poor rates in 1838, £215. 7s. IHthes commuted 
in 1840. 

LLANTHEWY-SKIRRIT, Monmouth, a parish 
in the lower division of the hun*^- and union of 
Abergavenny: 141 miles from London, 9 from 
Usk.-o«ck'(For access and postal arrangements see 
above. )-<e*c-The living, a rectory in the archd^^* 
and diocese of Llandatf, is valued at £7. lOs. 24d.: 
pros, net income, £187: patron, Rev. M. H. Jones: 
pres. incumbent, M. H. Jones, 1833 : contains 891 
acres: 22 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 105: ass'- prop^* 
£373 : poor rates in 1838, £44. 4s. Tithes com- 
muted in 1839. 

LLANTHEWY-VACH, Monmouth, a parish in 
the lower division of the bun*- of Usk, union of Pont- 
y-pool: 146 miles from London (coach road 146), 
5fromCaerleon, 5from Pont-y-pool.-o«c>.Gt West. 



Rail, through Stonohouse and Gloucester, to Chep- 
stow, thence 6 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Gloucester, &c., 137 miles.^a**- 
Money orders issued at Newport : Liondon letters 
deliv**- lOj a.m. : post closes 2 p.m.-o«c^The living, 
a perpetual curacy in -the archd^- and diocese of 
Llandaff, is valued at £8: pres. net income, £77: 
patron, Jesus College, Oxford: pros, incumbent, 
JohnProbert, 1817: contains 990 acres: 32 houses: 
pop°- in 1841, 172: ass**- prop^^- £1,413: poor rates 
in 1838, £82. 8s. 

LLANTHONY, Gloucester, an extra-paro- 
chial place adjacent to the city of Gloucester, on 
the eastern bank of the Severn : 106 miles from 
London, 1 from Gloucester, 10 from Cheltenham, 
-*3««=-The monks of Llanthony Abbey settled here 
in 1136, and founded a monastery, the revenues of 
which, at the general dissolution, amounted to 
about £750 per annum. The site was granted, in 
the thirty-second year of Henry VIII., to Arthur 
Porter, Esq., and was conveyed in marriage by a 
fi^male descendant, to Sir John Scudamore, ances- 
tor to Viscount Scudamore, and ultimately fell 
through another lady, Frances Fitzroy Scudamore, 
to the Duke of Norfolk, and his grace the present 
duke is now in possession of all the records of the 
priory, which are believed to be the most com- 
plete of any in England. 

LLANTIIONY-ABBEY. See Cmyoy. 

LLANTILIO-GROSSENNY, Monmouth, a pa- 
rish, upper division of the hun**- of Skenfreth, union 
of Monmouth, on the northern bank of the Trothy : 
150 miles from London (coach road 137), 8 from 
Monmouth, 8 from AbergaYcnny.-o«^Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonchouso and Gloucester, to Mon- 
mouth, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Gloucester, &c., 141 miles.-o«=-Mo- 
ney orders issued at Monmouth: London letters 
deliv**' 9 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«o-One of the 
scliools here is endowed with £40 a year; the 
other charities produce about £150 a year, part of 
which is used in the apprenticing of poor children. 
-o*=>-The living (St. Thelian) a vicarage in the 
archd'^- and diocese of LlandafF, is valued at 
£10. 10s. 5d. : pres, net income, £270: patron. 
Dean and Chapter of Llandaff: pres. incumbent r 
David Davies, 1847: contains 5,480 acres : 150 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 699: ass*** prop^^- £4,320: 
poor rates in 1 838, £2G2. 3s. 

LLANTILIO-PERTHOLEY, Mox^iouth, a 
parish in the lower division of the hun^- and union 
of Abergavenny : 157 miles from London (coach 
road 144), 2 from Abergavenny » 15 from Mon- 
mouth. ^o«e-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouso 
and Gloucester, to Monmouth, thence 15 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, 
&c., 148 niiles.-o«> Money orders issued at Aber- 
gavenny : London letters deliv**- 8 a.m. : post closes 
4^ p.m.-o^o-The charities produce about £34 per 
annum.-o«=i-The living (St. Thelian), a vicarage in 
the archd^- and diocese of LlandafF, is valued at 
£8. 3b. 9d : pres. net income, £242 : patron. Dean 
and Chapter of Llandaff : pres. incumbent, W. B. 
M. Lisle, 1799: contains 6,150 acres: 167 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 808 : ass**- prop^- £4,178: poor rates 
in 1837, £287. lOs. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANTRISAINT, Anglesey, a parish in the 
hun^- of Llyon and Menai, union of Anglesey, 



North Wales. The parish includes the chapelries 
of Llanllibio and Rhodygeidio : 272 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 269), 5 from Gwindy, 9 from Holy- 
head.-o»o-Gt. West. Rail, through Crewe and Ches- 
ter, to Holyhead, thence 9 miles: fwm Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 172 miles. Money orders is- 
sued at Bangor: London letters deliv*- 11 a.m. : post 
doses 1 p.m.-o«!^In the church there is a monument 
to the memory of Dr. Williams, whose son Sir Wm. 
Williams, the most eminent lawyer of his day, was 
for some time speaker of the House of Commons, 
in the time of Cliarles II., and acted as Solicitor- 
General on the memorable trial of the seven Bi- 
shops, in the time of Charles's popish successor. 
o»e» The living (St. Avran, St. Teuan, St. Sanan), 
a discharged rectory with the curacies of Ceidio, 
Gwredog, Llanllibio, and Llechcynfarwydd, in the 
archd'- of Anglesey, is valued at £15. lOs. : pres. 
net income, £915: patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. 
incumbent, H. W. Jones, 1820: contains 173 
houses: pop"- in 1841,523: asB**- prop'- £2,959 : 
poor rates in 1838, £211. Is. 

LLANTRISAINT, Monmouth, a parish m the 
upper division of the hun*** of Usk, union of Pont- 
y-pool : 150 miles distant from London (coach road 
145), 3 from Usk, 10 from Chepstow.^=«c-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouso and Gloucester, to Chep- 
stow, thence 10 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Gloucester, &c., 141 miles.-e«s-Mo- 
ney orders issued at Usk : London letters deliv'*- 9 
a.m. : post closes 3 J p.m.-o^o-Tho living (St. Peter, 
St, Paul, and St. John), a discharged vicarage with 
that of Pertholey, in the archd'- and diocese of 
LlandafF, is valued at £6. 8s. 9d. : pres. net income, 
£131: patron. Rev. R. Davies: pres. incumbent, 
J. Irving, 1831 : contains 3,180 acres: 54 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 329: ass**- prop^- £2,219: poor rates 
in 1837, £159. 18s. 

LLANTRISENT, (or Llantrisaint,) Glamor- 
GAN, a parish, borough and market-town in the 
hun*- of Miskin, union of Cardiff, South Wales : 
185 miles from London (coach road 171), 11 from 
Cardiff, 11 from Bndgend.^.c:-Gt. West. Rail. 
through Stonehouso, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Cowbridge-Road station, thence 5 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucestct, &c., 
176 miles.-=»»c^Money orders issued at Cardiff and 
Pontypridd : London letters deliv**- 10 J a.m. : post 
closes 2 p.m.-occ*-The town is situated on an accli- 
vity of considerable height, on the borders of the 
great coal basin of Wales, and commands an exten- 
sive prospect of the Vale of Glamorgan. The streets 
are narrow, and most of the houses are old, and 
bear little of the aspect of modern improvement. 
A neat town-hall and market-place were built by 
the late Marquis of Bute. The church is a spacions 
edifice in the Norman style of architecture. There 
are several dissenting chapels in the place. Un- 
der the will of Sir Leoline Jenkins, the parish re- 
ceives £20 every fourth year; the other charities 
produce about £5 per annum. The borough, in- 
cluding the town, but not the whole of the parish, 
which is very extensive, being ten miles long, and 
in some places 5 miles wide, was incorporated by 
Richard, Earl of Warwick, in the time of Henry 
VI. The corporation consisted of the constable of 
the castle, the steward, the portreve, aldermen, 
and other office-bearers. The castle, which never 






LLA 61 

■ — — - ■ - 

oonld have been very considerable, is now in 
nuns, but it will always be interesting, from the 
beautifal Tiews wbich can be seen from its site. 
Under the Reform Act, LlantriaRnt unites with 
Cardiff, and Cowbridge, in returning one member 
to parliament. There are several collieries near the 
town, and the district abounds with lead and iron 
ores. The petty-sessions for the hundred are 
held here. 8ir Leoline Jenkins was a native of 
this parish, and was the son of a small freeholder, 
whose christian name of Jenkins he assumed for 
his own surname, as was the custom at that period. 
He received the rudiments of his education at Cow- 
bridge, whence in the year 1641 he was removed to 
Jesus CoUege, Oxford, but having, during the 
civil war which broke out shortly afterwards, 
espoused the royal cause, he was compelled to 
leave the university, and return to his native 
oounty. There he was protected and sheltered 
for some time by Sir John Aubrey, of Llantryddid, 
the great benefactor of the partisans of Charles. 
The contest continuing, he left the country and tra- 
velled for three years on the Continent, but returned 
at the restoration of monarchy to his old college, 
of which, upon the death of Dr. Maunsell, he was 
made the principal. During the Dutch war, his 
profound knowledge of civil and maritime law, 
procured for him the office of Judge of the Court 
of Admiralty, and in 1668, the Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, at the request of the king, Charles II. 
made him judge of his Prerogative Court. He 
was subsequently sent to France, to settle the af- 
fiiirs of Henrietta, the king's mother, wei^t ambas- 
sador to Cologne and Nimeguen, and on his return 
was elected one of the representatives of the uni- 
versity of Oxford. In 1680 he was made a privy 
councillor, and appointed secretary of state. He 
died in 1685, and not having l^en married, left 
the bulk of his property to his own college ; the 
remainder he left to charitable uses, and towards 
the endowment of Cowbridge School.-o»c.-The liv- 
mg (St lUtyd, St. Tyfodwg, and St. Gwnno), a 
vicarage in the archd^* and diocese of Llandaff, is 
valued at £26. 148. 2d. : pros, net income, £649 : 
patron, Dean and Chapter of Gloucester : present 
incumbent, Evan Morgan, 1845: contains 256 
houses: pop"- in 1841,3,222: probable pop"- in 
1849, 3,705 : ass*- prop^- £9,319 : poor rates in 
1838, £994. Tithes commuted in 1840.-c»e^Mar- 
ketday: Friday. Fairs: Feb. 13, May 12, Aug. 
12, and Oct. 29, for cattle.-o«o^Inn8 : Commercial, 
Cross Keys, Rickard's Arms. 

LLANTRITHYD, Glamoroas, a parish in the 
hun** of Dinas-Powis, union of Cardiff, South 
Wales: 185 miles from London (coach road 173), 
3 from Cowbridge, 11 from Bridgend. -o^si- Gt. 
West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow to Cowbridge road station, thence 5 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 176 mile8.-o«o-Money orders issued at 
Cowbridge: London letters deliv**- llj a.m.: post 
closes 12} p.m.-o*e^The charities produce about 
£6. lOf. per annum. Calamine, manganese, lead, 
tad lime, are found in the parish.-e^^The living 
(8t Illtyd), a disch'*- rectory in the archd^- and 
diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £8. 13s. 4d. : pres. 
net income, £165 : patron. Sir T. D. Aubrey : pres. 
iDcambent, B. T. Tyler, 1839 : contains 45 houses: 



LLA 



\n. 



pop"- ju 1841, 228: ass*- prop^- £1,517: poor 
rates in 1838, £147. 138. Tithes commuted in 
1839. -o.K^ Llantritbyd Hall is the seat of Sir 
Thomas Digby Aubi*oy, Bart., who, according to 
Vincent, Windsor Herald in the time of Elizabeth, 
is descended from the blood royal of France, his 
ancestor. Saint Aubrey, having come over with 
William the Conqueror. Sir Reginald, his son, 
assisted Bernard de Newmarch in the subjugation 
of part of Wales, and received the lands of Aber- 
cynfig and Slough for his part of the spoil. From 
him was descended W^iUiam Aubrey, LL.D., regius 
professor of law at Oxford, one of the council for 
the marches of Wales, and one ef the Masters of 
Requests for Queen Elizabeth ; and whose grand- 
son. Sir John Aubrey, was created a baronet in 
1660, for his zealous and disinterested loyalty to 
Charles I. From tliat gentleman the present 
honourable representative of the family, who suc- 
ceeded as seventh baronet on the death of his 
uncle in 1826, is a lineal descendant. 

LLANTOOD (or Llantwood), Pembroke, a par- 
ish in the hun*^* of Cilgarron, union of Cardigan, 
South Wales : 264 miles from London (coach road 
242), 3 from Cardigan, 19 from Haverfordwest. 
-oao-Gt. West. Bail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 50 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
255 miles.-3*oMonoy orders issued at Cardigan : 
London letters deliv^* 9 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
■^^•c>^ The living is a vicarage, annexed to that 
of St. Dogmaels: contains 54 houses: pop*^* in 
1841,300: ass*- prop^- £883 : poor rates in 1838, 
£90. 88. 

LLAN-WFYDD. See Lijinepydd. 

LLANUWCH-Y-LYNN, Merioneth, a parish 
in the hun*- of Penlyn, union of Bala, North 
Wales, on the river Dee : 207 miles from London 
(coach road 199), 5 from Bala, 14 from Dolgelly. 
-o»o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 30 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 102 
miles.-o-o-Money oi-ders issued at Corwen : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 12) p.m.: post closes 11) a.m. 
-«=>«e^One of the schools here was endowed with 
£25 a year by the late Dr. Daniel Williams, and 
almshouses for six poor persons were founded and 
endowed with £42 a year, in 1832, by the Rev. 
Mr. Vaughan, one of the canons of the chapel royal 
at Windsor.-o«o-The living (St. Deiniot), a perpe- 
tual curacy in the archd^- and diocese of St. Asaph, 
is valued at £8. lOs^. 2d.: pres. net income, £113: 
patron, Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart. ; pros, incumbent, 
H.Jones, 1807: contains 235 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 1,329: probable pop»- in 1849, 1,528: ass'*- 
prop^- £4,407 : poor rates in 1838, £436. 5s.-««c>. 
Fairs : April 25, June 20, September 22, October 
16, and November 22, for sheep, cattle, and horses. 

LLANY ACHES, Monmouth^ a parish in the 
lower division of the hun^* of Caldicot, union of 
Newport: 147 miles from London (coach road 
140), 7 from Chepstow, 7 from Caerlcon.-o»c-Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Chepstow, thence 7 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 138 miles. -«m»> 
Money orders issued at Chepstow : London letters 
deliv**- 10 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«3«c.-The paro- 
chial charities produce about £10 a year.-o«c»-The 



liTing, a disch*'' rectory in the archd'^- and diocese 
of Llandaff, is valued at £10 : pres. net income, 
£194: patron, Sir C. Morgan, Bart. : pres. incum- 
bent, T. Morgan, 1810: contains 2,150 acres: 65 
houses : pop"- in 1841, 305 : ass*^ prop^^- £1,608 : 
poor rates in 1838, £121. 198. 

LLANVAES. See Llanpaep. 

LLANVAIR-DISCOED, Monmouth, a parish in 
the upper division of the bun**- of Caldicot, union 
of Chepstow : the parish includes the hamlet of 
Dinham : 140 miles from London, 6 from Chep- 
stow, 6 from Black-Rock. --om>. (For access and 
postal arrangements, see above.) -ok*- The living 
(St. Mary) is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the 
vicarage of Caerwent: pres. net income, £186: 
contains 2,000 acres: 37 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 
186: ass^- prop^"* £1,280: poor rates in 1838, 
£90. 19s. 

LLANYAIR-KILGIDIN, Monhoutit, a parish 
in the upper division of the hun^ and union of 
Abergavenny, on the river Usk ; 153 miles from 
London (coach road 140), 5 from Abergavenny, 
11 from Monmouth.^o«e>-Gt. West. BaU. through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
11 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &o., 144 miles.-o^oMoney orders is- 
sued at Abergavenny: London letters deliv'* 9 
a.m. : post closes 3^ p.m.-o«>-The parochial cha- 
rities produce about £9 per annum. -o*»-The living 
(St. Mary), a disch'*- rectory in the arohd^' and 
diocese of LlandafF, is valued at £5. Is. lO^d. : 
pres. net income, £395: patron. Sir C. Morgan, 
Bart. : pros, incumbent, F. Lewis, 1831 : contains 
2,020 acres : 45 houses: pop"* in 1841, 276: ass** 
propy £2,276: poor rates in 1838, £100. 19s. 

LLAN VAIR-WATERDINE, Salop, a parish in 
the hun^* of Burslow, union of Knighton, on the 
northern bank of the river Teme ; 158 miles from 
London (coach road 166), 4 from Knighton, 10 
from Bishop's Castle.^o^^Gt West. Rail, through 
Oxford to Worcester, thence 40 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Worcester, &c., Ill 
mi les.^o«> Money orders issued at Presteign : Lon- 
don letters deliv*^ 12^ p.m.: post closes 11^ a.m. 
-o«c»-The living, a perpetual curacy in the archd^* 
of Salop, and diocese of Hereford, is valued at 
£30: pres. net income, £73: patron, Earl Powis: 
pres. incumbent, J. B. N. Kinchart: contains 
8,120 acres: 94 houses: poplin 1841,603: ass**- 
propy- £3,970 : poor rates in 1838, £254. 13s. 

LLANVALTEG. See Llanfallteg. 

LLANVAPLEY, Monmouth, a parish in the 
lower division of the bun*** and union of Aberga- 
venny, on thet western bank of theTrothy: 152 
miles from London (coach road 140), 5 from 
Abergavenny, 11 from Usk.-o^s-Gt. West Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 10 miles : from Derby, thrpugh Birming* 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 143 milcs.-o«9-Money orders 
issued at Abergavenny : London letters deliv*^* 9 
a.m.: post closes 3 J p.m.-o«o-The living (St. 
Mapley), a rectory in the archd''- and diocese of 
Llaudatf, is valued at £10. 5s. 2iA, : pres. net in- 
come, £231 : patron. Earl of Abergavenny : pres. 
incumbent, T. Williams, 1827: contains 770 
acres: 23 houses: pop"- in 1841, 124: ass*-propy- 
£1,003: poor rates in 1837, £65. 168. 

LLANVAREl'H. See Llamfajibth. 



LLANYEDON. See Llakfedw. 

LLANVETHERINE, MonMotiTB, a parish io 
the lower division of the hun^ and union of Aber- 
gavenny : 142 miles firom London, 5 from Aber- 
gavenny, 13 from Monmouth.-««^(For access and 
postal arrangements, see above.)-*Me-The living 
(St. James the Elder), a rectory, in the arohd^* 
and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £14 7s. S^d.: 
pres. net income, £260 : patroui Earl of Aberga- 
venny: pres. incumbent, F. C. Steel, 1845: con- 
tains 1,960 acres: 45 houses: pop"- in 1841, 212: 
ass*** prop^- £2,599: poor rates in 1837, £160. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANVIGAN. See LLAMFEUOAif. 

LLAN VIU ANGEL, near Roogiet, Monmouth, 
a parish in the lower division of the hun*^ of Caldi- 
cot, union of Chepstow, and north of the mouth of 
the Severn : 148 miles from Londqu (coach road 
139), 8 firom Chepstow, 9 from Caerleon.-o»c^Gt. 
West Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Chepstow, thence 8 miles: ttom Derby, through 
Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 139 mUes.-oK>- 
Money orders issued at Chepstow : London lettera 
dellv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-oM».The living 
(St. Michael), a disch*** rectory in the archd'^* and 
diocese of LUndaff, is valued at £6. 98. 4id. : pres. 
net Income, £95: patron. Sir C. Morgan, Bart.: 
pres. incumbent, S. Williams, 1812: contains 550 
acres: 7 houses: pop"* in 1841, 44: ass'*' prop''' 
£478: poor rates in 1838, £42. 13s. Tithes com- 
muted in 1839. 

LLANYIHANGEL, near Us&, Monmouth, a 
parish in the upper division of the hun*^ and union 
of Abergavenny, on the river Usk: 166 miles 
from London (coach road 141), 7 from Usk, 5 from 
Abergavenny.*««»^Glt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house and Gloucester to Newport, thence 10 miles: 
from Derby, throu^ Birmingham and Gloucester, 
&c., 155 iniles.-««oi>Money orders issued at Usk : 
London letters deliv**- 10 a.m.: post closes 2} p.m. 
->3*o.The charities produce about £15 per annum. 
^o«>-The living (St. Michael) a disch^* rectory in 
the archd^' and diocese of IJandaff, is valued at 
£3. 8s. 9d. : pres. net income, £123 : patron. Sir 
S. Fludyer, Bart: contains 410 acres: 22 houses: 
pop"' in 1841, 123: ass^- prop''' £673: poor rates 
in 1838, £24. 12s. 

LLANVIHANGEL-CRUCORNEY, Monmouth, 
a parish partly in the lower division of the hun^- of 
Abergavenny, and partly in the upper division of 
the hun^' of Skenfroth, union of Abergavenny; the 
parish includes the hamlet of Penbiddle: 158 miles 
from London (coach road 145), 5 from Abergavenny, 
16 from Monmouth.-o«»-Gt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 
16 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 149 miles. -o«>- Money orders 
issued at Abergavenny : London letters deUv^* 9 
a.m. : post closes 3) p.nL.-<»M>.The charities pro- 
duce about £8. 10s. per annum.-o«3^The living 
(St. Michael), a disch^- vicarage in the archd^* and 
diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £5. 19s. 7d. : pres. 
net income, £281: patron. Duchy of Cornwall: 
pres. incumbent, Hon. H. Rodney, 1827: contains 
3,440 acres: 83 houses: pop»* in 1841, 400: ass"^ 
prop^' £2,078: poor rates in 1838, £264. 2s. 

LLANYIHANGEL - LIANTARNAM, Mon- 
mouth, a parish in the lower division of the bun*'* of 



Utk, union of Newport, on a branch of tho Usk : 160 
miles from London (coach road 147), 3 from Caor- 
leon, 6 from PontypooL-oM^^Gt West. Rail, through 
Stonchonae and Gloacester to Newport, thence 4 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloaoester, &c., 1 51 miles.-o«^Money orders issued 
St Newport : London letters deliv^- 10 a.m. : post 
closes 2| p.m.-o<M>There was formeiiy a Cistertian 
abbey here, the revenues of which, at the dissolu- 
tion, amounted to £71, 3s. 2d. per annum.-o«c>- 
The liTing, a perpetual curacy in the archd^* and 
diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £5: pros, net 
income, £108: patron, £. Blewitt, Esq.: pres. 
incumbent, D. Davies, 1836: contains 5,780 acres: 
124 hoQses: pop»- in 1841, 780: ass"^ prop^"- £3,555: 
poor rates in 1838, £175. lis. 

LLANVIHANGEL-PONTY-MOILLE, Mon- 
MOimi, a parish in the lower division of the bun*** 
of Usk, union of Pontypool, intersected by the 
Brecon canal : 157 miles from London (coach road 
147), 5 from Uak, 1 from Pontypool.-=3<«-Gt. West, 
Bail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Hon- 
month, thenoe 15 miles: from Derby, through 
ffirmingham and Gloucester, &c,, 148 mile8.-a*o^ 
Honey orders issued at Usk: London letters deliv^' 
9^ a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.>e«o-The living, a per- 
petual curacy in the aichd^- and diocese of Llan- 
daff^ is valued at £5 : pres. net Income, £87 ; pa- 
tron, C. H. Leigh, Esq.: pres. incumbent, J. 
Probert, 1815: contains 1,900 acres: 29 houses: 
pop"- m 1841, 202: ass"*- prop^* £1,291 : poor rates 
in 1838, £105. 14s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLANVIHANGEL-TOB-Y-MYNYDD, MoR- 
nouTK, a parish in the upper division of the hun^ 
of Bagland, union of Chepstow: 148 miles from 
Londtm (coach road 137), 8 from Chepstow, 8 from 
Manmoiith.>o*^Gt.West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Chepstow, thence 8 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c«, 
139 milea. ■■• c Money orders issued at Chepstow: 
London letters deliV** 10 a.m. : post doses 4 p.m. 
-«»»o-The living, a disch^* rectory in the archd^- 
and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £2. 156, 5d. : 
pres. net income, £89: patron. Archdeacon of 
Llandaff: pres. incumbent, John Price, 1847: 
OQOtains 1,080 acres: 45 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
£197 : asA^ propT- £1,182 : poor rates in 1838, 
£80. 8s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLAinriHANGEL - Y8TEBN - LLEWERN, 
MoKMOuTH, • parish in the hun*^ of Ragland and 
l^enfreth, union of Monmouth, on the southern 
bank of the Trothy : 148 miles from London (coach 
nwd 135), 6 from Monmouth, 10 from Usk.-^aMp- 
Qt. West. Rail, through StoncJiouse and Glouces- 
ter to Monmouth, thenoe 6 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c«, 139 
milds. -«>«>- Money orders issued at Monmouth: 
London letters deliv^* 8) a.m.: post closes bi p.m. 
"QMs-The living (Bt. Michael), a rectory in the 
■rohdT- and diocese of UandafT, is valued at £9. 
88. 4d.: pres. net income, £211: patron. Earl of 
Abergavenny: pres. incumbent, Wm. Crawley, 
1831: contains 2,150 acres: 35 houses: pop"* in 
1841, £153: aas*^ pi^- £790: poor rates inl838, 
£159. 

LLANVRECHYA (Lower and Upper), Mon- 
■OOTB, a pariah in the lower division of the hun^ 
of Uflk, union of Ptmtypool: 160 miles from Lon- 



don (coach road 146), 2 from Caerlcon, 6 from 
PontypooL-o«oGt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Newport, thence 4 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 
151 miles.-o«=^Money orders issued at Newport: 
London letters deliv**- 9^ a.m. : post closes 3 p.m. 
-o«c*Tho charities produce about £5 a year.-o«c^ 
The living, a perpetual curacy in the archd''- and 
diocess of Llandaff, is valued at £12: pres. net 
income, £85 : patrons. Dean and Chapter of Llan* 
daff: pres. incumbent, William Powell, 1829 : 
contains 1,960 acros: 228 houses: pop*** in 1841, 
1,591 : probable pop**- in 1849, 1,830: ass<>- prop^- 
£3,419 : poor rates in 1838, £294. 198. 

LLANY YNOE, Hereford, a chapelry situated 
near the souroe of the Monnow, in the parish of 
Clodock : 152 miles from London (coach road 155), 
18 from Abergavenny, 18 from Hereford.-««»-Ot. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse and Gloucester to 
Ross, thenoe 20 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Gloucester, &c., 143 mile8.-'<Me» 
Money orders issued at Abergavenny: London 
letters deliv*- at noon : post closes 12 J p.m.-o«^ 
The living, a perpetual curacy in the arohd^- of 
Brecon and diocese of St. David's: pros, net in- 
come £61 : patron, Yicar of Clodock : pres. incum- 
bent, Edmund Davis, 1849 : contains 64 houses : 
pop^ in 1841, 244: ass*** prop^' £1,726: poor rates 
in 1837, £67. 19s. 

LLANWARNE, Uerbford, a parish in the up- 
per division of the hun^' of Wormelow, union of 
Ross: 139 miles from London (coach road 127), 7 
from Ross, 8 from Hereford.-*«c^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse to Gloucester, thence 28 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou« 
cest^, &c«, 130 miles.-o«»Money orders issued at 
Ross : London letters deliv^' 9 a.m. : post closes 
8 p.m.-^Mo-Some trifling charities belong to the 
parish.-o«oThe living, a roctory in the arohd^* and 
diocese of Hereford, is valued at £15 : pres. net in- 
come, £340 : patron, Governors of Guy's Hospital : 
pres. incumbent, W. J. Thornton, 1833: contains 
2,399 acres: 65 houses : pop"* in 1841, 377 : ass**- 
propy- £2,371 : poor rates in 1838, £188. 9s.-o«:- 
Lyston House, a mansion of some size, is in this 
parish, and belongs to Robert M. Lingwood, Esq. 

LLANWENARTH (Ultra and Cxtra), Mow- 
MOUTH, a parish in the hun^* and union of Aber- 
gavenny, on the northern bank of the Usk : 157 
miles from Loudon (coach road 148), 2 from Aber- 
gavenny, 9 from. Crickhowell.-oa^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 15 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &a, 148 miles.^3*»-Money orders 
issued at Abergavenny : London letters deliv^* 8 
a.m. : post closes 4} p.m.-oM>^The charities produce 
£4 per annum.-o«o-The living (St. Peter), a roctory 
in the arohd^^- and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at 
£26. 6s. 3d.: pros, net income, £470: patron, 
Earl of Abergavenny: pros, incumbent, G. W. 
Gabb, 1823: contains 5,110 acros: 428 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 2,582 : probable pop"- in 1849, 
2,969 : ass*- prop^- £4,934 : poor rates in 1837, 
£411. lis. 

LLANWENLLWFO, AsOLEaET, a parish m the 
bun'*- of Twroelyn, union of Anglesey, North Wales: 
256 miles from London, 9 from G windy, 5 from 
Amlwch. -«>«o. Nor. West. Rail, through Crowo, 



LLA 



64 



LLA 



Chester, and Bangor, to Llanfair, thence 14 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 156 raile8.-o»c^ 
Money orders issued at Bangor: London letters 
deli v**- at noon : post closes at noon.-<*o-The liv- 
ing is a curacy, annexed to the perpetual curacy of 
Amlwch: contains 108 houses: pop"- in 1841, 594: 
ass*- propy- £1,027 : poor rates in 1838, £126. 

LLANWENOG (Lower and Upi'er), Cardigan, 
a parish in the bun**- of Moyddyn, union of Lampe- 
ter, on the river Teifi, South Wales : 268 miles 
from London (coach road 217), 6 from Lampeter, 
13 from Newcastle.^3«c^Gt. West. Rail, throup^h 
Stonehonse, Gloucester, and Qicpstow, to Llandilo 
Vawr, thence 18 miles: from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 259 miles. -=3«>-Money 
orders issued at Lampeter: London letters doliv**- 
5i p.m. : post closes 8 p.m.^3«o-The living (St. 
Gwynog), a disch*** vicarage in the archd^- of Car- 
digan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at £8 : 
pres. net income, £138 : patron, Bishop of St. 
David's: pres. incumbent, Hugh Felix, 1845: 
contains 338 houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,578: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 1,814: ass^- prop^- £3,720: 
poor rates in 1838, £924.-3«<=-Fair, Jan. 14. 

LLANWEKN, Monmouth, a parish in the lower 
division of the bun*- of Caldicott, union of Newport: 
161 miles from London (coach road 142), 5 from 
Newport, 12 from Chep8tow.^=*c^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Newport, 
thence 5 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 152 miles. -o«c^Money orders is- 
sued at Newport: London letters deliv*- 10 a.m. : 
post closes 3 pm.-o«c:^The living (St. Mary), a 
disch*- rectory in the archd^- and diocese of Llan- 
daff, is valued at £4. Os. lOd. : pres. net income, 
£100: patron. Sir T. Salusbury, Bart.: pres. in- 
cumbent. Sir C. Salusbury, 1816: contains 910 
acres: 4 bouses: pop"- in 1841, 15: ass** prop^- 
£1,309: poor rates in 1838, £34. 

LLANWINIO (Eastern and Westeux), Car- 
marthen, a parish in the bun* of Derllys, union of 
Cannarthen, South Wales : 247 miles from Jjondon 
(coach road 231), 13 from Carmarthen, 10 from 
Newcastle-in-Emlyn.-o«o-Gt. West. Riiil. through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 33 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 238 miies.--»«c^Money orders issued 
at Carmarthen : London letters deliv*- 6 p.m. : post 
closes 8 p.m.-o«o-There is a Calvinistic Methodist 
chapel here.-otc-The living (^6. Gwyno) is a per- 
petual curacy in the arclid^* of Carmarthen, and 
diocese of St. David's : pres. net income, £83 : pa- 
tron, W. Howell, Esq. : pres. incumbent, Rees 
Griffiths, 1844: contains 198 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 1,035: probable pop"* in 1849, 1,190: ass*- 
propy* £2,452: poor rates in 1837, £315. l8.-=«=- 
Fair, Nov. 12, for sheep and pedlery. 

LLANVVNDA, Carnarvon, a parish in the bun** 
of Uwch-Gorfai, union of Caniarvon, North Wales : 
248 miles from London (coach road 244), 4 from 
Carnarvon, 15 from Tremadoc.-<=*c-Gt. West. Rail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Banc^or, thence 10 
miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 148 miles. 
-oao^Money orders issued at Carnarvon : London 
letters deliv** 9 a.m.: post closes 10^ a.m.-o«^ 
There are two Calvinistic Methodist chapels here. 
-aoo-The living (St. Gwynday) is a vicarage, with 
the curacy of Llanfaglan, in the archd^* and dio- 



cese of Bangor : pres. net income, £270 : patron, 
Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, E. Richards, 
1840 : contains 208 houses : pop"* in 1841, 1,586 : 
probable pop"* in 1849, 1,824: ass*- prop^* £3,102: 
poor rates in 1837, £537. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LLANWNDA, Pembroke, a parish in the hun** 
of Dewisland, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales : 279 miles from London (coach road 260), 
3 from Fishguard, 15 from IIaverfordwe8t.-o««>.Gt. 
West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and 
Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 65 miles: from 
Derby, througb Stonehouse, Gloucester, &c., 270 
miles.-o«o-Money orders issued at Haverfordwest : 
London letters deliv** 8 J a.m. : post closes 3 J p.m. 
-»•<:=- The living (St. Gwynday), a disch*' vicarage 
in the archd^* and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £3. Ss. 2|d. : pres. net income, £220: patron, 
Dean and Chapter of St. David's : pres. incumbent, 
A. H. Richardson, 1840: contains 223 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1,045: ass*- prop^- £2,084: poor 
rates in 1838, £214. 12s.-*o««- Fairs : May 29, and 
Nov. 22, for cattle, horses, and sheep. 

LLANWNEN, Cardigan, a parish in the hun** 
of Moyddyn, union of I^am peter, South Wales, on 
a branch of the Teifi: 268 miles from London 
(coach road 214), 3 from Lampeter, 16 from New- 
castle. -«3«<=^ Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Llandilo Vawr, thence 
18 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 259 miles.-o^c-Money orders issued at 
Lampeter: London letters deliv*- 5 p.m.: post 
closes 9 p.m.-o«ei-The living (St. Qwynin) , a disch*- 
vicarage, with the curacy of Silian, in the archd'- 
of Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued 
at £3. 48. 9jd. : pres. net income, £102 : patron, 
Bishop of St. Davj^'s : pres. incumbent, John Ed- 
wards, 1849: contains 59 bouses: pop"- in 1841, 
325: ass** prop^- £1,110: poor rates in 1838, 
£193.-3«c*.Fair, Dec. 13, for cattle, horses, cheese, 
and pedlery. 

LLANWNOG (I^wer and Upper), Montgo- 
mery, a parish in the hun*- of Llanidloes, union of 
Newton and Llanidloes, North Wales, north of the 
Severn : 213 miles from London (coach road 181), 
6 from Newtown, 11 from Llanfair. -=»«o- Nor. West. 
Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Newtown, thence 6 miles: from Derby, through 
StafFord, Shrewsbury, &c., 128 miles.-o«c^Moncy 
orders issued at Newtown : London letters deliv*- 
1^ p.m.: post closes 11 a.m.^^c-Thcre are two 
Calvinistic Methodist chapels here. The charities 
produce about £9. 10s. per anhum.-=>«<=»-The living 
(St. Gwyimog), a disch*- vicarage in the arclid''- 
and diocese of Bangor, is valued at £4. 16b. 5jd. : 
patron. Bishop of Bangor: pros, incumbent, D. 
James : contains 268 houses: pop"* in 1841, 1,716: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 1,973 : ass*- prop^* £4,191 : 
poor rates in 1838, £1,043. 4p. 

LLANWONNO, Glamorgan, a parish in the 
hun*- of Miskin, union of Merthyr-lvdvil, South 
Wales: the parish includes the hamlets of Gly- 
connon and Haroddrjmog : 199 miles from T^on- 
don (coach road 179), 8 from Merthyr-Tydvil, 3 
from Llantrisant. -=>•<=- Gt. W&st. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Merthyr- 
Tydvil, thence 8 miles: from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Gloucester, &c., 190 milo8.-o»o-Money 



orilan uantd at Merthyr-TydvU : Landon letters 
ddiT"^ 12} p.iii. : post closes 11} a.in.^9*e-The 
ch&rities paR>dace alwat £5 per animm."o«c»Tlie 
living (St Wonao) ia a perpetual car«cy in the dio- 
oese of LUmdafif, subordinate to the vioarage of 
Lkntiisaat: patron, Vicar of Uantrisant: pres. 
ineombent, T. Morgan, 1827 : contains 191 houses: 
pop"- in 1641, 1,614 : probable p(^" in 1849, 1,856 : 
A88<<- piopS"- £2,301 : poor lates in 1837, £387. 5s. 

LLANVVfiDA, Garmabtb£v, a parish in the 
han^ of Cayo, union of liandoYery, South Wales, 
on the riv«r Toxrj : 261 miles from London (coach 
road 196), 5 from Llandovery, 11 from Uandilo- 
Vawr.-««c*>Gt. West. Rail, through Btonehouse, 
Glonoester, and Chepstow, toLLandilo-yawr, thence 
11 milee : from Derby, through Birmingham, Qlou- 
eeater, &c^ 252 miles. -o«e-MoDey orders issued at 
LkmdoTery: London letters ddUv**- 2 p.m.: post 
ekiies 1 p.m.-o«c»>A school here has a small en- 
doirakeiit.-o«K3-The living (St.Cawrday) is a curacy, 
omesed to the vicarage of Llansadwni : contains 
91 houses: pop»-inl641,553: ass*^ propi"- £2,090 : 
poor rates in 1838i, £231. ISs. 

LLANWRIN, MosTOOMBaT, a parish in the 
han^- asd onion of Machynlleth, North Wales: 
the pittiah includes the townships of Glyncaerig 
wilh iJanwrin, and Llaafechan with Blaengle- 
PTToh : 235 miles from London (coach road 203), 
4 from Hacbynieth, ^ from Llanidloes.<>«>«<»^Nor. 
West. RaiL through Wolverhampton and Shrcws- 
boiy to Newtown, thence 28 miles : Arom Derby, 
throQgh Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 150 mile8.*o«»- 
Money orders issued at Machynlleth : London let- 
ten dcliv'* 1 p.m. : post closes 12} p.m.-o*^-There 
is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. The cha- 
rities prodnee about £8 a year. ^««o^The living (St. 
Gwrin), a rectory in ihe arcbd^- and diocese of 
8l Aaaph, is valned at £12. 16s. 6^d, : pres. net 
income, £290 : patron, Bi^op of St. Aaaph : pres. 
incumbent, Isaac Bonaall, M.A., rural dean, 1827 : 
oontaina 154 houses: pop"* in 1841, 822: ass*'- 
prop^- £7,390 : poor rates in 1838, £459. 98.^>#c^ 
The gCDtlemen's seats are — Fronfelen, D.P. Evans, 
Eaq.; and Uwyngwem, F. J. Ford, Esq. 

LLAN WRTH WL, Bbeoon, a parish in the hxm*- 
of Buiith, union of Rhayader, South Wales, on the 
river Wye : 231 miles &om London (coach road 
183), 2 from Rhayader, 14 from Bnilth.-oMi.Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolyerhampton and Bhrews- 
bory to Newtown, thence 24 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 146 miles.-*Mci- 
Mooey ordeca issued at Rhayader: London letters 
deiiv'* 12} p.m. : post closes at noon.^<9M>-There is 
an Independent ohiqtel here. The diarities pro- 
dace about £16 a year.^3«>The living (St. Wrthwl) 
is a diach'* vicarage in the archd^* of Brecon, and 
diocese ui St David's: pres. net ineome, £85: 
patixn. Bishop of St. David's: pres. incumbent, 
C3iarles D. Rees, 1845 : contains 95 houses : pop*** 
ia 1841, 568: asfl*** prop^- £1,459: poor rates in 
1838, £263. 14a. 

LLANWRTYD, Bbbcoh, a parish in the hun^* 
of Boilth, union of Llandovery, South Wales, on 
the river Irfon : the parish includes the hamlets of 
Oaudd-Madog and Llechwcddol : 172 miles from 
London (coach itmd 186), 13 from Buiith, 12 from 
Uaadovery.-oMk-Grt. West. Rail, through Stonc- 
hoQse and Gloucester to Monmouth, thence 50 



voL.in. 



miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 163 miles.^=>«=^Money orders i$;Bued at 
Buiith : London letters deliv^* 5} p.m. : post closes 
4 p.m.^3M».There are some mineral springs here, 
the waters of which resemble in quality those of 
Harrowgate.-*9M>-The living (St. David) is a cu- 
racy, subordinate to the yicarage of Llangam- 
march : contains 117 houses : pop"* in 1841, 638: 
ass**- propy- £1,601 : poor rates in 1838, £181. 17s. 

LLANWYDDELLAN, Montgomery, a parish 
in the hun*^- of Newtown and Llanidloes, North 
Wales: 214 miles fLX)m London (coach road 186), 
7 from Newtown, 10 from WclshpooL-o-o-Nor. 
West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrews- 
bury to Newtown, thence 7 miles : from Derby, 
through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 129 miles.-o«='^ 
Money orders issued at Newtown : London letters 
deliv^- 2 p.m. : post closes 10} a.m.-o*e>There is 
a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here.-o«>The living 
(St. Gwyddellan), a rectory in the arcbd^* and dio- 
cese of St. Asi4)h, is vahied at £3. 8s. 4d. : pres. 
net income, £176: patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : 
pres. incumbent, J. M'Intosh, 1847 : contains 102 
houses: pop"- in 1841, £517: ass^- prop^- £1,702: 
poor rates in 1838, £310. 

LLANWYDDYN with CONWY, MoNTGOMEar, 
a parish in the hun*'* and union of Llanfyllin, 
North Wales : 183 miles from London (coach road 
173), 6 from Oswestry, 12 from Wel^pool.-o«<=- 
Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 6 miles: from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 98 miles. 
-a«c3. Money orders issued at Oswestry: London 
letters deliv^ 10 a.m.: post closes 2} p.m.-o«e»>The 
living is a perpetual curacy in the archd^- and dio- 
cese of St. Asaph, is valued at £10 : pres. net in- 
come, £100 : patron, Earl of Powis : pres. incum- 
bent, J. L. Richards, 1825 : contains 109 houses : 
pop'- in 1841, 593 : ass*^- prc^- £1 330 : poor rates 
in 1838, £208. 12s. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LLANYBLODWELL, Salop, a parish in the 
hun^* of Oswestry, on the river Tanat : 183 miles 
from London (c<MU$h road 173), 6 from Oswestry, 
12 from Welsbpool.-o«c»-Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, 
thence 6 miles: from Derby, through Stafford, 
Shrewsbury, &c., 98 miles.-oM^Monoy orders is- 
sued at Oswestry: London letters deliv^- at 10 
a.ro. : post closes 2J p.m.-^swv-One of the schools 
here is endowed with £6 per annum; the other 
chaiitics produce about £2. 128. per annam.-<Me^ 
The living, a vicarage in the archd^- and diocese 
of St. Asaph, is valued at £7. 12s. Id. : pres. net 
income, £271 : patron. Bishop of St. Asaph: pres. 
incumbent, John Parker, 1841 : contains 2,820 
acres: 162 houses: pop*** in 1841, 961: ass^- 
propy- £4,379 : poor rates in 1838, £371. lOs. 

LLANYBYTHER (North and South), Car- 
M ARTHKH, a parish in the hun*^- of Cathinog, union 
of Lampeter, South Wales, on the eastern bank of 
the Teifi: 265 miles from London (coach road 
216), 5 from Lampeter, 19 from Carmarthen. -o»o- 
Gt. West. Rail, through Stonchousc, Gloucester, 
and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 15 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, 
&C., 256 miles.-oK^JSIoncy orders issued at Lam- 
peter: London letters deliv*^- 5^ p.m. : post closes 
9 p.m.-oK>>There is an Independent chapel here. 



-3»<=-The living (St. Peter), is a vicarage in the 
orchd^' and diocese of St. David's : pres. uet in- 
come, £117: patron, Lord Chancellor: pres. in- 
cumbent, Hugh Felix, 1848 : contains 225 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 1,120: probable pop"- in 1849, 
1,288: ass**- prop''- £2,356: poor rates in 1838, 
£374. Tithes commuted in 1840. -o»«^ Fairs: 
July 17, for pedlery; November 1 and 21, for 
cattle, sheep, horses, and cheese. 

LLANYCHAIARN, Cardigan, a parish in the 
hnn^' of liar, union of Aberystwith, South Wales, 
situated on a promontory called New-Quay Head, 
at Cardigan bay : 247 miles from London, 1 from 
Aberystwith, 15 from Lampeter .-o«e-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Newtown, thence 40 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 129 miles .-o«»-Money 
orders issued at Aberystwith : London letters deliv*** 
5 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-o«<^There is a Calvin- 
istic Methodist chapel here.-c>«:>^The living (St. 
Llwchaiam), a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of 
Cardigan, and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£6. 7s. 8Jd. : pres. net income, £97: patron, T. P. 
Cliichester : pres. incumbent, Evan Morgan, 1849 : 
contains 124 houses: pop"* in 1841, 666: ass^* 
propy- £2,140 : poor rates in 1837, £237. 9s. 

LLANYCHAKE, Pembroke, a parish in the 
hun*^- of Kemesfl, union of Haverfordwest, South 
Wales : 279 miles from London (coach road 256), 
3 from Fishguard, 5 from Newport.-«*»-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Swansea, thence 65 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 270 miles. 
•'•MO'Money orders issued at Haverfordwest : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 8} a.m.: post closes 3} p.m. 
-o»o-The living (St. David), a disch**- rectory in 
the archd^* of Cardigan and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £3. 6s. 8d. : pres. net income, £69 : 
patron. Rev. J. W. James : pres. incumbent, J. 
W. James, 1825: contains 32 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 207 : ass'*- prop^- £449: poor rates in 1838, 
£52. 28. 

LLANYCHLLWYDDOG, Peicbroke, a parish 
in the hnn*'- of Kemess, union of Cardigan, South 
Wales : 255 miles from London, 4 from Fishguard, 
11 from Haverfordwest.-<Me^( For access and postal 
arrangements, see above.)-o«>-The living, a disch**- 
rectory, with the curacy of Llanlawer, in the 
archd''- of Carmarthen, and diocese of St. David's, 
is valued at £8 : pres. net income, £155 : patron, 
Thomas Lloyd, Esq.: pres. incumbent, W. W. 
Thomas, 1825 : contains 34 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
214: ass"^- propi"- £633 : poor rates in 1838, £63. 

78. 

LLANYCRWYS, Carmabthsn, a parish in the 
hnn**'- of Cayo and Cathinog, union of Lampeter^, 
the parish includes the hamlets of Isforest and 
Mynachty: 264 miles from London (coach road 
207), 13 from Llandovery, 4 from Lampeter. -o«o- 
-o«»-Gt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, to Llandeilo-Fawr, thence 14 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &c., 255 miles. -««o-Money orders issued at 
Llandovery: London letters dcliv*"3 p.m.: post 
closes 9 a.m.-oM^There is an Independent chapel 
hcre.-«»«c^Tho living (St. David) is a perpetual 
curacy, in the archd'^- of Carmarthen, and diocese 
of St. David's: pres. net income, £60: patron, 



John Johnes, Esq. : pres. incumbent, David P. 
Lewis: contains 80 houses: pop*- in 1841,400: 
ass'*- propy- £1,047 : poor rates in 1838, £78. 

LLANYDDAUSAINT (or Llakdeusakt), Ats- 
olesey, a parish in the hun^ of Tal-y-Bolion, union 
of Anglesey, North Wales: the parish includes 
the chapelry of Llanfairynghornwy : 263 miles 
from London (coach road 270), 11 from Holyhead. 
-o«:^Nor. West. Rail, through Crewe and Chester 
to Holyhead, thence 11 miles: from Derby, 
through Crewe, &c., 171 mile8.-«>«>Money orders 
issued at Holyhead: London letters deliv^ 11} 
a.m. : post closes 12} p.m.-«>«oSome trifling cha- 
rities belong to this parish.-^^e-The living (St 
Marcellus and Marcellinus) , a disch**- rectory, 
with the chapelries of Llanbabo and Llanfairyn- 
ghornwy, in the archd^* of Bangor, and diocese 
of Bangor, is valued at £20. 168. 3d: pres.net 
income, £615: patron. Bishop of Bangor: pres. 
incumbent, James Williams, 1821 : contains 138 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 524: ass^- prop^- £2,554 : 
poor rates in 1838, £351. 10s. 

LLAN-Y-DRINDOD. See Llahdmhdod. 

LLANYEAR. See Llanhib. 

LLANYGWYRDDON (or Llah-Grwtddos), 
Cardigan, a parish in the lower division of the hun'- 
of liar, union of Aberystwith, South Wales : 247 
miles from London (coach road 211), 8 from Aber- 
ystwith, 18 from Lampeter^-3«>Nor. West RaiL 
through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to New- 
town, thence 40 miles : from Derby, through Staf- 
ford, Shrewsbury, &c., 162 miles.-oM>.Money or- 
ders issued at Aberystwith : Iiondun letters deliv^- 
6 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-o*o-The living, a per- 
petual curacy in thcarchd^- of Carnarvon, and dio- 
cese of St. David's, is valued at £6. Ids. 4d. : pres. 
net income, £176: patron, J. P. B. Chichester: 
pres. incumbent, Morgan Evans, 1849 : contains 
149 houses: pop"- in 1841, 642: ass'- prop'- 
£1,410: poor rates in 1838, £138. 12s. 

LLANYKEYAN, Pembroke, a parish in the 
hnn^* of Dungleddy, union of Narbeth, South 
Wales, on the river Cleddy : 269 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 253), 7 from Narbeth, 13 from 
Cardigan.-«>«>Gk. West. Rail, through Stonehouse, 
Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, thence 55 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloa- 
cestor, &c., 260 miles.-a^oMoney orders issued at 
Narbeth: London letters deliv°' 9} p.m.: post 
closes 7J p.m.-o«e^The living is a perpetual en- 
racy in the archd''* and diocese of St. David's: 
pres. net income, £51 : patron. Lord Milford : pres. 
incumbent, Lewis Davies: contains 102 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 449: ass**- prop^- £1,196: poor 
rates in 1838, £111. 

LLAN YKILL, Merioneth, a parish in the hnn'* 
of Penllyn, union of Bala, North Wales, adjacent 
to Bala, on the western side of Bala lake : the par- 
ish includes the market town of Bala : 207 miles 
from London (coach road 196), 1 from Bala, 19 from 
Llanrwst.-o»o-Nor. West. Rail- through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Oswestry, thence 30 
miles: from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, 
&c., 122 miles.-oM»Money orders issued at Corwen: 
London letters deliv*'- 11^ a.m. : post doses 12} 
p.m.>o«=-One of the schools here is endowed with 
£80 a year ; the other charities produce about £34 
a year.-oM».The living (St. Beuno), a rectory in 




the aitlid'' of Montgomery, and diocese of St. Asaph, 
is rained at £9. ^. 4d. : pres. net income, £350 : 
patron, Bishop of fit Asaph: pres. incumbent, P. 
Price, 1841 : contains 532 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
2.467 : probable pop"- in 1849, 2,837 : ass^^ prop^* 
£6,214: poor rates in 1838, £822. ll8.-o^Fairs: 
June 2, September 11, October 2. 

LLANYLTID. See Llahellttd. 

LLAN-Y-MOWDDWY, Misbiokbth. a parish 
in the hun^- of Tal-y-Bont, and of Mowddwy, 
anion of Dolgelley, North Wales : 217 miles from 
London (coach road 206), 14 from Dolgelley, 14 
from BaU.«eM^Nor. West. Bail, through Wolver- 
hampton and Shrewsbury to Welshpool, thence 24 
miles: from Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, 
&C., 132 miles.-cMc.'Money orders issued at Cor* 
wen, Dolgelley, Machynlleth, and Welshpool: 
London letters deliv^ at Mallwyd 10 a.m. and 3^ 
p.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-ow»*The charities produce 
about £7 a year.^o«c^The living (St Tydecho), 
a rectory in tlie diocese of St. Ajsaph, and archd^* 
of Powys, is v^alned at £16. 8s. 4d. : pres. net in- 
come, £218 : patron, Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. 
incumbent, J. Williams, 1849 : contains 133 houses: 
pop^ m 1841, 622 : ass''- prop^- £1,857 : poor rates 
in 1837, £274. 8s. 

LLANYMTHEYERTE. See Llandovbbt. 

LLANYMYNECH, Denbigh, a parish, partly 
in the hun'- of Chirk, North Wales, and^ribly in 
the hun^ of Oswestry, county of Salop, with a 
small portion extending into Montgomeryshire, on 
the river Vymwy : the parish includes the town- 
ships of Carreghova, Llwyntlanan, and Treprunal : 
18o miles from London (coach road 169), 6 from 
Oswestry^ 16 from Shrewsbury.-o«>-Kor. West. 
Bail, through Wolverhampton and Shrewsbury to 
Oswestry, thence 6 miles : from Derby, through 
Stafford, ^rewsbury, &c., 98 miles.-<M»>Money 
orders issued at Oswestry : London letters deliv^ 
10 a.m. : post closes 2^ p.m.-o«o-The charities 
pnduoe about £2. 128. per annum.-o«»>The living, 
a rectory in the archd''' and diocese of St Asaph, is 
Tslued at £12. 138. 4d. : pres. net income, £394: 
patron. Bishop of St. Asaph : pres. incumbent, J. 
Lnzmore, 1829: contains 189 houses: pop*** in 
1841, 954: ass''- propi"- £3,504: poor rates in 
1838, £193. 12s. 

LLANYNHENEDLE. See Llanxhohehisl. 

LLANYNYS, Bkecoit, a parish in the bun**- and 
union of Builth, South Wales, on the river Irion : 
182 mQes from London (coach road 176), 3 from 
Builth, 15 from Bhayader.^oM^-Gt. West. BaU. 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Ross, thence 
50 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloooester, &c, 173 n]iles.-««o-Money orders is- 
sued at Builth: London letters deliv^* 3 p.m. : 
post closes 6^ p.m. -««»- The charities produce 
about £8 per annum.-o«o>The living, a disch^ rec- 
toiy in the archd^* of Brecon, and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £7. Os. 7id. : pres. net in- 
come, £101 : patron, Bishop of St. David's : pres. 
incumbent, (Carles Price, 1809 : contains 33 
bofoses: pop*- in 1841, 175: asel^ prop^"- £742: 
poor rates in 1838, £34. 17s. 

LLANYPUMPSAINT. See Llahpuhpsaiht. 

LLANYNYS, Dkhbioh, a parish in the hun^*, 
onion, and borough of Buthin, North Wales, on 
the river dydd: 197 miles from London (coach 



road 208), 8 from Ruthin, 6 from Denbigh.-e«ei^ 
Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhampton and 
Shrewsbury to Llangollen, thence 18 miles : from 
Derby, through Stafford, Shrewsbury, &c., 112 
miles."o«>-Money orders issued at Ruthin : Lon- 
don letters deliv'*- 9 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o«c^ 
Tho charities produce about £2. 10s. per annum. 
-o«c»-The living (St. Saem), a vicarage with the 
curacy of Cyffylliog, is valued at £8. 13s. 4d. : 
pres net income, £415 : patron. Bishop of Bangor: 
pres. incumbent, Henry Owen, 1844: contains 
143 houses: pop"* in 1841, 749: ass*- prop^^- 
£8,428 : poor rates in 1837, £1,161. Ss. 

LLANYSTINDWY, Carhabvoh, a parish in 
the bun**- of Evionydd, union of Pwllheli, North 
Wales : 263 miles from London (coach road 239), 7 
from Tremadoc, 8 from Pwllheli.-o«>-Nor. West. 
RaiL through Crewe and Chester to Bangor, thence 
25 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 163 
miles. -o«<»> Money oriders issued at Carnarvon : 
London letters deliv^* 7^ p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-••c-One of the schools here is endowed with £30. 
12s. per annum ; the other charities produce about 
£10 per annum. The Independents and Calvin- 
istic Methodists have places of worship here.-o«»- 
The living (St. John the Baptist), a rectory in 
the archd^' of Merioneth, and diocese of Bangor, is 
valued at £11. 8s. l^d. : pres. net income, £485: 
patron. Bishop of Bangor : pres. incumbent, John 
Hughes, 1846: contains 228 houses: pop*^- in 
1841, 1,241: probable pop»- in 1849, 1,427: 
as8<L prop]"- £2,938: poor rates in 1838, £388. 18s. 
-o^Fair, April 17. 

LLANYWERN, Brbooit, a parish in the hun^- 
of Penkelly, union of Brecon, South Wales : 170* 
miles from London (coach roaid 172), 4 from Bre- 
con, 15 from CrickhoweU.-o«o>Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester to Monmouth, 
thence 28 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Gloucester, &c., 161 miles.-o«c».Money orders 
issued at Brecon : London letters deliv^ 9^ a.m. : 
post closes 2} p.m.-<Mo-The living (St. Mary) is a 
perpetual curacy in the archd''' and diocese of St. 
David's : pres. net income, £81 : patron, Bishop 
of St. David's : pres. incumbent, Thos. Williams, 
1804: contains 32 houses: pop**- in 1841, 115: 
ass"^ prop^- £1,549 : poor rates in 1837, £58. 16s. 

LLECHCYNFABWYDD, Anglesby, a parish 
in the hun**- of Llyfon, union of Anglesey, North 
Wales : 273 miles from London (coach road 2^6) , 
2 fromGwindy, 10 from Holyhead.-o»c^ Nor. West. 
Rail, through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, 
&c., 173 mi]es.*««»^Money orders issued at Ban- 
gor : London letters deliv**- 10 a.m. : post closes 2 
p.m.-o«c^The living (St. Cynvarwy) is a curacy 
subordinate to the rectory of Llantrisaint : con- 
tains 93 houses: pop''- in 1841, 396: ass^ prop^* 
£1,276 : poor rates in 1838, £273. 4s. 

LLECHRHYD, Cabdioar, a parochial chapelry 
in the bun**- of Troedyrawr, union of Cardigan, 
South Wales, on the northern bank of the Teifi : 
259 miles from London (coach road 236), 3 from 
Cardigan, 6 from Newcastle.-a«c^Gt. West. Rail, 
through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to 
Swansea, thence 45 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 250 miles. -««> 
Money orders issued at Cardigan : London letters 



LLO 



68 



LLY 



deliv*** 9 p.m. : post closes 9 p-m.-ow^-Tho liring 
(the Holy Cross) is a perpetual curacy in the 
archd^' of Cardigan, and diocese of St. Darid's: 
pres. net income, £109 : patron, T. Lloyd, and C. 
R. Longcroft, alternately: pres. incumbent, J. 
Owen, 1833: pop"- in 1841,397: poor rates in 1838, 
£89. 17s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLECHWEDD. See Lbckwith, 

LLECHWEDDOL, Bbbcoit, a hamlet in the 
parish of Llanwrtyd — (which see for access, &o.) : 
185 miles from London, 12 from Llandovery, 12 
from Builth.-oKs^Money orders issued at Llando- 
very : London letters deliv^* 2^ p.m. : post closes 
9^ a.m.-e«oContains 62 houses: pop"' in 1841, 
297 1 ass*- propy- £896. 

LLECHYLCHED, Anoleset, a parish in the 
hun*- of Llyfon, union of Anglesey, North Wales : 
272 miles from London (coach road 267), 8 from 
Gwindy, 9 from Holyhoad.^3«o-Nor. West. Bail, 
through Crewe and Chester to Holyhead, thence 9 
miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c, 172 
miles.-«3*e^Money orders issued at Bangor : Lon- 
don letters deliv*' 11^ a.m. : post closes 12 J p.m. 
^=»««-The living (St. Ilched) is a curacy subordin- 
ate to the rectory of Llanbculan : contains 87 
iiouses: pop"* in 1841, 618: ass*- prop'* £915: 
poor rates in 1838, £198. 5s. 

LLOUGHOR, (or Loughos), QtAMoaaAN, a pa- 
rish and borough in the hun*^- of Swansea, uniou 
of Llanelly, South Wales, on the eastern bank of 
the river Lloaghor : 221 miles fVom London (coach 
toad 212), 7 from Swansea, 17 from Carmarthen. 
-e«o-Gt. West. Kail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter and Chepstow, tx) Swansea, thence 7 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham and Gloucester, 
&c., 212 miles. *9«c>Money orders issued at Swan- 
sea : London letters deliv'^- 4 p.m. : post closes 8 
p.m.-o«s^The town, which consists principally of 
one long street^ contains some good houses ; the 
church stands at the west end of it. The trade 
consists principally in coal, which is raised within 
the parish, and exported ; but there are also some 
zinc works, and a manufactory of pyroligneous 
acid. Vessels of 200 tons burthen can come up 
to the colliery wharf which is Just above the town. 
Many Roman antiquities have been discovered in 
the neighbourhood, and here there are the traces of 
two small camps. The ruins of the old castle 
stand on a mount in the vicinity. Lloughor com- 
biuQS with Swansea, Neath, Aberaron, and Kenfig, 
in returning one member to parliament.-«3«>-The 
living (St. Michael) , a rectory in the archd''* of 
Glamorgan, and diocese of St. David^s, is valued at 
£9. 10s. 5d. : pres. net income, £180: patron, Lord 
Chancellor : contains 2,000 acres : 51 houses : pop"* 
in 1841, 854: ass*- prop^- 918: poor rates in 1838, 
£116. 12s.^oK>. Fairs: first Monday in June, and 
October 10. 

LLOUGHOR, (or Louohor), Glamorgan, a 
borough in the above pari8h.-o«c»-(For access and 
postal arrangements see above.)-<9«oContains 1,000 
acres: 127 houses: pop"- in 1841, 765: ass^-prop^- 
£965: poor rates in 1838, £141. 12s. 

LLOWIS, Radnor, a parish in the hun'- of 
Pain's-Castle, union of Hay, South Wales, on the 
western bank of the Wye: 162 miles from London 
(coach road 159), 3 from Glasbury, 3 from Hay. 
-o»o-Gt. West Rail, through Stonehouse and Glou- 



cester, to Ross, thence 30 miles: ham Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 153 
miles.-o«o^Moiney orders issued at Hay: London 
letters deliv'- 11 a.m. : post closes 12^ p.m.^*»«> 
The living (St. Meilig), a vicarage with that of 
Llanddewy-Fach, in the archd'* of Brecon, and 
diocese of St. David's, is valued at £8. 10s. : pres. 
net income, £132 : patron. Archdeacon of Breck- 
nock; pres. incumbent, John Williams: contains 
66 houses: pop"- in 1841, 390: as^- prop^- £1,622: 
poor rates in 1838, £192. 14s. 

LLUGWY. See I^eitohos-Lliowt. 

LLYSDINAN, Bbecok, a hamlet in the parish 
of Llanafanfawr — (which see for access, &c.). South 
Wales : 179 miles from London, 6 from Builth, 9 
from Rhayader.-cMc»-Money orders issued at Builth : 
London letters deliv^ 3} p.m. : post closes 6 p.m. 
-ocoContams 41 houses: pop"- in 1841, 252: ass**- 
prop^- £882: poor rates, in 1838, £106. 15«. 

LLTSFAEN, Carnarvon, a parish locally in the 
hun**- of la-Dulas, county of Denbigh, but belong- 
ing to the hun*- of Ci-euddyn, union of Conway, 
North Wales: 216 miles from London (coach road 
228), 3 from Abergele, '8 from Conway.-««»-Nor. 
West. Rail* through Crewe and Chester, to Aber- 
gele, thence 3 miles : from Derby, through Crewe, 
&c., 116 mile8.-o*»>Money orders issued at Rhyl: 
Lmidon letters deliv'* 9} a.m. : post closes 3J p.m. 
-o*e-Thore is a Calvinistic Methodist chapel here. 
Lime is found abundantly in the parish. -«w«».The 
living (St Cynvran), adisch*' rectory in the archd^* 
and diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £12. Os. 5d.: 
pres. net income, £250: patron. Bishop of St. 
Asaph: pres. incumbent, Edward Oldfleld, 1885: 
contains 121 houses: pop"- in 1841, 679: am'- 
propy- £1,118 : poor rates in 1838, £227. 

LLYSVAEN, (orLtsvAKs), Glamorgan, a pa- 
rish in the hun^ of Kibbor, union of Cardiff, South 
Wales: 184 miles from London (coach road 166), 
5 from Cardiff, 3 from Caerphilly.-«»o^Gt West 
Rail, through Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chep- 
stow, to Cardiff, thence 5 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 175 
mlles.-o«»-Money orders issued at Cardiff: London 
letters deliv^ 10^ p.m.: post closes 1^ p.m. o>& 
The parochial charities produce about £18 a year. 
-e«o-The living (St. Denis), a perpetual curacy in 
the archd^* and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at 
£10 : pres. net income, £60 : patrons. Earl of Ply- 
month, and C. K. Kemoys Tynte, Esq., alternately: 
pres. incumbent, B. Jones, 1820: contains 51 
houses: pop", in 1841, 207: ass*- prop^- £1,110: 
poor rates in 18d8« £127. 13s. 

LLYSWEN, Breoon, a parish in the hun*^ of 
Talgarth, union of Hay, South Wales, on the river 
Wye : 177 mites from London (coach road 161), 5 
from Hay, 14 from Breoon.--s*o-Gt» West Rail, 
through Stonehouse and Gloucester, to Ross, thence 
35 miles : fiom Derby, through Birmingham and 
Gloucester, &c., 168 miles.^^^^Money orden is- 
sued at Hay : London lettert deliv^ 11 a.m. : post 
closes at noon.-p-o-The living, a disch*- rectory in 
the arohd^- and diocese of St David's, is valued at 
£3. 14s. 7d. : pres. net income, £145: patron, 
Joseph Bailey, Esq.: pres. incumbent, W. M. 
Williams, 1847 : contains 40 houses : pop*^' in 1841, 
172 : a88<>. prap^"- £580 : poor rates in 1838, £53. 4s. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 




LLY8WERNI, l(or Libworhey), Glamosqan, a 
pariah In the htm*- of Cowbridge, union of Bridg- 
end and Cowbridgc, South Wales : 195 miles from 
London (coach road 175), 2 from Oowbridge, 6 
from Bridgend.-o*»-Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
hoose, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Bridgend, 
thenoe 6 miles: finom Derby, through Birmingham 
and Glonoester, &c, 186 miles. -o^o-Money orders 
iasned at Gowbridge: London letters deliv*- 11 
a-m. : post close» 1 p.m.^o«:^The living (St, Tud- 
ril), a rectory annexed to the vicarage of Llantwit- 
Major: contains 34 houses: pop^* in 1841, 175: 
•sal*- propy- £1,511 : poor rates in 1838, £99. Is. 

LLYSFRAN, (or Llts-t-vrane), Pembboke, a 
parish in the hun**- of Dangleddy, union of Narbeth, 
South Wales : 269 miles from London (coach road 
254), 8 from Haverfordwest, 8 from Fishguard. 
-^•cs-Gt. West. Kail, through Stonehouse, Glouces- 
ter, and Chepstow, thence 55 miles : from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Gloucester, &c., 260 
iiriles.-o»e.-Money orders issued at Haverfordwest: 
London letters deliv^- 9 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m. 
-ow^Tho living (St. Meiler), a disch**- rectory in 
the archd' and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£3. Os. 5d : pres. net income, £104 : patron. Lord 
Milford and W. H. Bcourfield, alternately: pres. 
incambent, Tho. I'homas: contains 32 houses: 
pop*- in 1841, 191 : ass**- prop^- £712 : poor rates 
in 1837, £110. 16s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LLYWELL (orLLEWTLLT), Brecon, a parish in 
the hnn*- of Defjrnock, union of Brecon, South 
Wales : the parish includes the hamlets of Trayan- 
Hase, Trayan-Mawr, and Ysclydach: 211 miles 
from London (coach road 182), 11 from Brecon, 9 
from Llandovery. «o»c.-Gt. West Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Merthyr 
Tydvil, thence 20 miles: from Derby, through 
ffirmingham, Gloucester, &c., 202 milcs.-oK» 
Honey orders issued at Brecon : London letters 
deliv*- 11 J a.m. : post closes 12J p.m. «o«c^Thcre 
is an Independent chapel here. The charities 
produce about £6 per annum. -o*o- The living 
(Uantrisaint), a vicarage in the archd>^' of Bre- 
con, and diocese of St David's, is valued at £9. 
IDs. 5d. : pres. net income, £152 : patron, Bishop 
of St. David's: pres. incumbent, David Parry, 
18*21 : contains 363 houses : pop"- in 1841, 1,684 : 
probable pop"- in 1849, 1,937: ass*- prop^* £5,311: 
poor rates in 1838, £771. 18s. 

LOAD (or Loso-Load), Somerset, a chapelry 
between the rivers Parrot and Yeo, in Martock 
parish — (which see for access, &c.) : 124 miles 
from London, 5 from Somerton, 4 from Ilchestcr. 
-o«o-Money orders issued at Somerton : London 
letters deliv*- 8i a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o«e,- 
The living is a curacy annexed to the vicarage of 
Martock. — (Returns with the parish.) 

LOAN-END, Durham, a township in Norham 
parish — (which see foe access, &c.): 338 miles 
from London, 4 from Berwick-on-Tweed, 9 from 
Cold8tream.-o*:»-Money orders issued at Berwick : 
London letters deliv'- 3 p.m.: post closes 10 a.m. 
-«*c.-Contain8 860 acres : 28 houses : pop*- in 1841, 
155: ass*- prop'- £1,781: poor rates in 1838, 
£67. 14«. 

LOBTHORPE. See Lebthorfb. 

LOCKERLEY, Haitts, a parish in the hun*- of 
Thomgate, union of Romsey, Andover division of 



the county, intersected by the Salisbury and 
Southampton canal: 106 miles from London (coach 
road 74), 6 from Romsey, 10 from Salisbury. -o.o- 
Sou. West Rail, through Bishopstoke to Salisbury, 
thence 10 miles: from Derby, through Rugby, 
Oxford, Reading, and Bishopstoke, &c., 193 miles. 
-o«<=-Money orders issued at Romsey: London 
letters deliv**- 8J a.m. : post closes 8J p.m.-o»o- 
There is a Baptist chapel here.-o*c-The living 
is a curacy annexed to the rectory of Mottisfont : 
contains 1,390 acres: 83 houses : pop**- in 1841, 
558 : ass*- prop^- £221: poor rates in 1838, £190. 
14» 

TjOCKHAY (or LocKo), Derby, a chapelry in 
Spondon parish — (which sec for access, &c.): 126 
miles from London, 4 from Derby, 11 from Not- 
tingham. 

LOCKING, Somerset, a parish in the bun*- of 
Wintcrstoke, union of Axbridge : 135 miles from 
London (coach road 134), 6 from Axbridge, 17 
from Bridgewater. -o*e^ Gt. West. Rail, through 
Bristol to Banwell station, thence 1 mile: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 149 
miles.-o«c*Money orders issued at Wells, Somerset t 
London letters deliv*- 8} a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-o»c>>Iu the church there is an ancient font, and ^ 
beautifal stone pulpit.-o«c.-The living (St. August- 
ine), a disch*- vicarage in the archd'- of Wells, and 
diocese of Bath and Wells, is valued at £5. 6s. 
10}d. : pres. net income, £199 : patron. Merchant 
Adventurers, Bristol : pres. incumbent, Alfred 
Harford : contains 980 acros : 30 houses : pop''- in 
1841, 166: ass*- prop^- £2,433: poor rates in 
1838, £61. lis. 

LOCKINGE (East and West), Berks, a parish 
in the hun*- and union of Wantage : the parish 
includes the tithing of Betterton and West Ginge : 
60 miles from London (coach road 58), 4 from 
Wantage, 9 from Abingdon.^3«o-Gt. West. Rail, 
to Didcot station, thence 7 miles : from Derby, 
through Rugby and Oxford, to Didcot, &c., 112 
miles. ^=>«<=^Money orders issued at Wantage : Lon- 
don letters dcliv** 8 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-o»c- 
The living, a rectory in the diocese of Oxford, is 
valued at £31. 10s. : pres. net income, £480 : 
patronage annexed to the Wardenship of All Souls' 
College, Oxford: pres. incumbent, Lewis Sneyd, 
1827: contains 3,680 acres: 77 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 325: aS8*-propy- £3,853: tithes of East Lock- 
inge commuted in 1840.-^»«c:-Lockinge House is 
the seat of Sir Henry Martin, Bart., whose grand- 
father, Henry Martin, Esq., comptroller of tho 
navy, was created a baronet in 1791. 

LOCKINGTON, Leicester, a parish in the 
hun*- of West Goscote, niiion of Shardlow: the 
parish includes the township of Remington : 122 
miles from London (coach road 116), 7 from Lough- 
borough, 11 from Derby. ^3«e- Nor. West. Rail, 
through Rugby to Loughborough, thence 7 miles. 
-o»c»AIoney orders issued at Loughborough : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 10 J a.m. : post closes 8 p.m. 
-o««=-The living (St Nicholas), a disch*- vicamgo 
in tho diocese of Peterborough, is valued at £7. 68. 
3jdf : pres. net income, £149 : patron, J. B. Story, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, P. Fosbrookc, 1 830 : con- 
tains 2,135 aci-es: 130 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
617 : ass*- prop^" £3,989 : poor rates in 1833, 
£271 . 9d. Tithes commuted in 1789. 



LOCKINGTON, East Rmnro, York, a parish 
in the Bainton- Beacon division of Harthill wapen- 
take, union of Beverley : the parish includes part 
of the townships of Aike and Lockington: 202 
miles from London (coach road 186), 6 from Be- 
verley, 8 from Great Driffield.-o«c^Gt. Nor. RaiL 
through Peterhorough, Boston, and Hull, to Bever- 
ley, thence 6 miles ; from Derhy, through Nor- 
manton, Selhy, and Hull, &c., 127 miles.-cs^s-Money 
orders issued at Beverley : London letters deliv"' 
11 a.m. : post closes 1^ p.m.-oM».There is a Wes- 
leyan Methodist chapel here.-o«o-The living (the 
Virgin Mary) , a rectory in the archd'"' of the ^t 
riding and diocese of York, is valued at £20 : pres. 
net income, £532 : pres. incumbent, Francis Lun- 
dy, 1817: contains 87 houses : pop"- in 1841, 433: 
ass**- propy- £5,115: poor rates in 1838, £141. Is. 
Tithes commuted. 

LOCKINGTON, East Riding, Yobk, a town- 
ship, partly in the above parish, and partly in that 
of Kilnwick.-o«c»-(For access and postal arrange- 
ments, see above.) -©•o-Con tains 2,780 acres: 101 
houses : pop"- in 1841, 526 : ass*- prop^- £4,465: 
poor rates in 1838, £13. Is. 

LOCKSTON (or Loxton), Somebset, a parish in 
the hun*- of Wintorstoke, union of Axbridge, on 
^he northern bank of the Axe: 136 miles from 
London (coach road 134), 4 from Axbridge, 8 from 
Wrington.-:»«<=-Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol to 
Ban well station, thence 2 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham and Bristol, &c, 149 miles. 
-o«»- Money orders issued at Wells, Somerset: 
London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post closes 4^ p.m. 
-©•cr-The living (St. Andrew), a rectory in the 
archd^- of W< lis and diocese of Bath and Wells, is 
valued at £15. 5s. 5d. : pres. net income, £284: 
patrons. Heirs of Archibald England, and Rev. D. 
S. Moncrieffe : pres. incumbent, D, S. Moncrieffe, 
1801 : contains 1,350 acres : 31 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 168 : ass**- prop^- £2,597: poor rates in 1838, 
£42. 14s. 

LOCKTON, North Riding, York, a chapelry 
in Middleton parish — (which see for access, &c.) : 
227 miles from London, 5 &om Pickering, 16 from 
Scarborough. ^•o-Money orders issued at Picker- 
ing: London letters deliv'- 11 a.m.: post closes 2^ 
p.m.-o«s-There is a Wesleyan Methodist chapel 
here.-o^cr-Contains 6,610 acres : 66 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 347: ass**- prop*"* £1,350: poor rates in 
1838, £66. Is. Tithes commuted in 1784. 

LOCKWOOD, West Riding, York, a township 
in Almondbury parish — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 190 miles from London, 2 from Hudders- 
field, 16 from Oldham.-oKs- Money orders issued at 
Huddersfield : London letters deliv^* 9^ a.m. : post 
closes 5} p.m.'OM.^The village is situated in a 
beautifully romantic valley. There are some 
springs here, the waters of which possess fine 
medicinal properties, and the baths which have 
been established here consequently acquired much 
celebrity .^3«c-The living, a perpetual curacy in thia 
diocese of Ripon: pres. net income, £150: patron. 
Vicar of Almondbury : pres. incumbent, T. B. Ben- 
stead, 1848: contains 1,670 acres: 609 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 4,303: ass**- prop^- £3,274: poor 
rates in 1838, £562. Is. 

LODDINGTON, Leicester, a parish in the 
hun**' of East Goscote, union of Billesdon: 81 



miles from London (coach road 94), 8 from Up- 
pingham, 12 from Melton-Mowbray.-o«c»-Nor. West. 
Rail, through Rugby to Market-Harborough, thence 

12 miles: from Derby, to Leicester, 29 miles, thence 

13 miles.-c>«:>^Money orders issued at Uppingham : 
London letters deli v^ 9jla.m.: post closes 4 p.m.-o^d- 
The living (St. Michael) , a vicarage in the diocese of 
Peterborough, is valued at £70 : pres. net income, 
£92: patron, Charles Morris, Esq.: pres. incum- 
bent, Mathew Wilson, 1843 : contoins 2,010 acres: 
30 houses: pop"- in 1841, 137: ass^- prop^- £2,960 : 
poor rates in 1837, £99. 15s. 

LODDINGTON, Northauftoit, a parish in the 
hun^- of Roth well, union of Ketteiing: 110. miles 
from London (coach road 77), 4 from Kettering, 2 
from Roth well. *OM»-Nor. West Rail, through Blia- 
worth to Northampton, thence 13 miles: from 
Derby, through Rugby to Market-Harborough, 
65 miles, thence 9 miles.-oM»Money orders issued 
at Kettering : London letters dcliv*** 9) a.m.: post 
closes 4 J p.m.-e«o-The living (St. Leonard), a rec- 
tory in the archd^* of Northampton and diocese of 
Peterborough, is valaed at £10. 4s. 4}d.: pres. 
net income, £421: patron, Lord Chancellor: pres. 
incumbent, G. £. Hanmer, 1817 : contains 1,020 
acres: 47 houses: pop"- in 1841, £226: ass'* 
prop^' £906: poor rates in 1838, £150. 19s. 

LODDISWELL, Devon, a parish in the hun*- 
of Stanborough, union of Kingsbridge, on the Avon: 
240 miles from London (coach road 205), 4 from 
Kingsbridge, 5 from Modbui'y.-oK>-Gi. West. Rail, 
through Bristol and Exeter, to Kingsbridge Road 
station, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham and Bristol, &c., 254 miles.-«M»>Money 
orders issued at Kingsbridge : London letters deliv*^ 
10 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-e«o-The charities pro- 
duce about £75 a year, one half of which is applied 
to parochial purposes.-a«o^The living (St. Michael), 
a vicarage with the curacy of Buckland-Tout- 
Saints, in the archd^* of Totness, and diooese of 
Exeter, is valued at £26. Os. 2 Jd. : prea. net in- 
come, £493: patron. Trustees: pres. incumbent, 
Harv. Marriott, 1847: contains 3,280 acres : 160 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,013: ass**- prop^- £3,929: 
poor rates in 1838, £393. Is. 

LODDON, Norfolk, a parish and market-town 
in the bun'- of Loddon, union of Loddon, union of 
Loddon, and Clavering, on a branch of the Yare ; 
128 miles from London (coach road 112), 11 from 
Norwich.*eM»*East. Co*- Rail, through Norwich, to 
Reedham, thence 3 miles: from Derby, through 
Syston, Peterborough, and Norwich, &c., 180 
mile8.-eM»Money orders issued at Norwich : Lon- 
don letters deliv*'- 9 a.m. : post closes 3-50 p.m. 
-«M»>The manor originally belonged to Roger Bi- 
god, Earl of Norfolk, who granted it on a feudal 
tenure to John de Segrave, from whose family it 
passed to Sir James Hobart, ancestor of the Earl of 
Buckinghamshire's family, and Lord Chief Justice 
of the Court of Common Pleas, in the time of Henry 
YIII. Sir James lived at Hales Hall, commonly 
called Loddon Hall, and built the church, which is 
a handsome stone structure, entirely at his own 
expense. In the town, which consists principally 
of one long street, there are chapels for the Wes- 
leyan and Primitive Methodists. The parochial 
charities produce about £115 per annum. Petty 
sessions for the hundred are held here. The Lod- 



don poor-law union compriseB 41 parishes, with 
t popnlation of ahout 14,000 j>erson8, spread over 
an area of 89 square miles.-a-o-The living (the 
Holy Trinity) is a vicarage in the archd^- of Norfolk, 
tnd diocese of Norwich : pres. net income, £300 : 
patron, Bishop of Ely : pres. incumbent, John J. 
Smith, 1849: contains 2,750 acres: 226 houses: 
pop»-in 1841, 1,197: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,377: 
•8**- propy- £5,862 : poor rates in 1838, £541. 14s. 
*o*c^Market day, Friday. Fairs: Easter Monday, 
and Monday after Nor. 21, for pedlery, horses, and 
bogs.-«*o*Banker8 : Harveys & Hndsons — draw 
oo Hankeys & Co. 

LODERS (or Lothebs), Dobset, a parish in the 
liberty of Lothers and Bothenhampton, union of 
Bridport, Bridport division of the county: 155 
miles from London (coach road 133), 2 from Brid- 
port, 14 from Dorchester. «oM^ Sou. West. Rail, 
through Southampton to Dorchester, thence 14 
miles: from Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, Read- 
mg, Southampton, &c., 244 miles.'o^e^Money or- 
dara issued at Bridport : London letters deliv*** 8 
a.m.: post closes 6 p.m.-oM»Some trifling charities 
belong to the parish. -««>. The living (St. Mary 
Magdalene), a disch^ vicarage in the diocese of 
Stnim, is valued at £14. 5s. 7^d. : pres. net in- 
come, £235: patrons, Lord Chancellor, and Sir M. 
H. Nepean, alternately : pres. incumbent, F. Doll- 
man, 1848: contains 2,250 acres: 165 houses: 
pop"-m 1841,952: ass*- prop^- £5,197: poor rates 
in 1837, £454. 2s. 

LODSWORTH LIBERTY, Sussex, a chapelry 
in the parish of Eastbourne — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 49 miles from London, 4 from Petworth, 4 
from Mi3hur8t."a*o-Money orders issued at Pet- 
worth: London letters deliv*- 8 a.m. : post closes 
6 p.m.-«Mo-Tlie living is a perpetual curacy in the 
archd^* and diocese of Chichester: pres. net income, 
£58 : patron. Earl of Egmont : pres. incumbent, 
C. L. 8. Clarke, 1846: contains 1,570 acres: 80 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 634: ass*"- prop^- £1,748 : 
poor rates in 1838, £323. 6s. 

LOFTHOUSE, Nobth Riddto, Yokk, a parish 
m the eastern division of Langbaurgh liberty, 
union of Gkiisborough : the parish includes the ham- 
let of Wapley: 289 miles from London (coach 
nnd 261), 8 from Guisborough, 13 from Whitby. 
-a«^Nor. West. Rail, through Rugby, Derby, and 
York, to Whitby, thence 13 miles: from Derby, 
'Uirough York, &c., 157 miles.-eMa*Money orders 
issued at Guisborough : London letters deliv^* 2 
p.m. : post closes 10^ a.m. -o^i- A considerable 
number of the inhabitants are employed in work- 
ing stone and alum from the rooks in the neigh- 
bourhood. The Independents and Wesleyan Me- 
thodists have places of worship here. The paro- 
chial charities produce about £8. lOs. per annum. 
-oKxThe living (St. Leonard), a rectory in the 
aichd^- of Cleveland, and diocese of York, is valued 
at £10. 14s. Ojd. : pres. net income, £575 : patron. 
Lord Chancellor: pres. incumbent, H. S. Htld- 
yard, 1842: contains 3,700 acres: 235 houses: 
pop* in 1841, 1,091: ass*»- prop^- £4,480: poor 
Tates m 1838, £383. 19s.-o*e^Market day, Thurs- 
day. 

LOFTHODSE. See Cablton with Lofthouse. 

LOFTSOME. See Wbessel. 

LOLWORTH, CAifBRiDQX, a parish in the hun*** 



of North Stow, union of St. Ives : 63 miles from 
London (coach road 57), 6 from Cambridge, 7 from 
Caxton.-o«e»-Nor. and East. Co*- Rail, to Cambridge, 
thence 6 miles : from Derby, through Syston and 
Peterborough to Long-Stanton station, 116 miles, 
thence 3 miles.-o«9-Money orders issued at Cam- 
bridge: London letters deUv^- 9 a.m. : post closes 
8} p.m.-e«^Some trifling charities belong to the 
parish.-o»o-The living (All Saints), a rectory in 
the archd^* and diocese of Ely, is valued at £6. 2s. 
Sid, : pres. net income, £182 : patron, G. Hudson, 
Esq. : pres. incumbent, R. H. D. Barham, 1839 : 
contains 800 acres: 12 houses: pop°' in 1841, 
12§ : ass<>- prop^- £942 : poor rates in 1838, £65. 4s. 
LONDESBOROUGH, East Ridino, York, a 
parish in the wapentake of Harthill, union of Pock- 
lington : 234 miles from London (coach road 191), 
3 from Market- Weighton, 5 from Pocklingtou. 
ot& Nor. West. Rail, through Rugby, Derby, Nor- 
manton, and Selby, to Market- Weighton, thence 3 
miles : from Derby, through Norman ton, &c., 102 
miles.-««o-Money orders issued at Market- Weigh- 
ton : London letters deliv'- 10^ a.m. : post closes 
2 p.m.-o«»-Thi8 is supposed to have been the Ro- 
man station of Delgoritia. An hospital was founded 
here and endowed by the first Earl and Countess 
of Burlington, for twelve poor persons, each of 
whom receives £5 monthly, besides clothing and 
fuel.^o«o-The living (All Saints), a rectory in the 
archd^' of the east riding and diocese of York, is 
valued at £16: pres. net income, £798: patron. 
Lord Albert Denison: pres. incumbent, W. G. 
Howard, 1832 : contains 4,200 acres : 41 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 267 : ass**- prop^- £2,592 : poor rates 
in 1838, £97. 15s. Tithes commuted in 1816 and 
1821.-o«3>'Londesborough House, one of the seats 
of His Grace the Duke of Devonshire (for whose 
genealogy and family history, see Chatsworth), 
is surrounded by a pleasing park, and commands a 
variety of charming prospects. It originally be- 
longed to the celebrated family of the Cliffords, 
Earis of Cumberland, from whom it went, by the • 
marriage of the only daughter and heiress of Henry, 
fifth and last earl, to the Earl of Cork, one of the 
ancestors of its present noble proprietor. 

LONDON AND ITS HISTORY. 

London is situated on an extensive plain, bounded 
on the north by the Highgate and Hampstead 
hills, and on the south by the Surrey hills. Its 
situation is admirably adapted for all the pur- 
poses of commerce, as it is built upon the river 
Thames, at a distance of about sixty miles from 
its mouth. From the Middlesex bank of the river, 
the buildings rise gradually, forming a hind of 
amphitheatre, as far up as the steeps of High- 
gate; on the Surrey side, the district is perfectly 
flat, having at one time been a mere marsh, fr^m 
the river to the base of the Surrey hills. The 
soil on both sides of the river is composed of gravel 
and clay, with a mixture of loam and sand. The 
climate is temperate, but variable and inclined to 
moisture. The mean breadth of the Thames at 
London is a quarter of a mile ; its depth is about 
twelve feet at low water, and from twenty-five to 
thirty feet at high water. When spoken of in its 
large sense, as the metropolis of the British Em- 



pire^ and inolnding Westminster and £k)athwark, 
with portions of Middlesex, Surrey, and Kent, Lon- 
don is of vast magnitude; the City, properly so 
called, forming but a comparatively small portion 
of the whole place. Its extent, comprising those 
Bubnrbs which are joined to it by buildinga, is 
about eight miles from north to south, or fi^om 
Highgate to Denmark hill ; about nine miles from 
Upper Gapton to Chelsea, or from N. E. to S. W.; 
and about eight miles from N. W. to & E., or from 
Hampstead to P^eckham: from W. to £., or from 
Paddlngton to Greenwich, is about 10 miles; and 
from S. W. to N. E., or from Stratford-le-Bow to 
Chelsea, is also about 12 miles. The line of build- 
ings on the Surrey side of the rirer extend for 
about 12 miles, firam Battersea Fields to Green- 
wich. Additions, however, are every day beiz^ 
made i» the immense mass of houses comprised 
within the above linuts, and it is impossible to say 
what may in some years be the IxHmdades of this 
vast accumulation of human habitations. 

Geoffrey of Moomonth, and the other dubious wri- 
ters, say that London was founded by Brute, a great 
grandson of ^neas, who called it Troy-novant^ or 
New Troy, and that it was siurrounded with walls 
by King L«d, who gave it the name of C^ter-Lud, 
x>r Lud's-town ; of this, however, we havo no au- 
thentic proof. The 'oldest mention of London is 
contained in Caesar's Commentaries, where it is 
supposed to be alluded to as Civitas Trinobantum, 
the city of the Trinobantes; and it is the opinion gi 
some authorities, that the ancient Watliag Street 
was a British road before it was used as the Pra- 
torian way by the people whom Caesar led into 
Britain ; there is, therefore, scarcely any doubt that 
London was the site of a city of the Britons, and a 
place of the very highest antiquity, having been 
founded soon after the immigration of the aborigines 
into the island. The derivations of its name are 
various. Peimant maintains that it is drawn from 
the British words Llyn-din, the City on a Lake, be- 
ing so calledfrom the appearance of the river Thames, 
when it covered the low grounds on the Surrey side. 
Other authorities derive it from Jjun-den, the City 
in a Grove, from the forest land which bordered the 
northern banks of the river, and rose as far as the 
wood-crowned heights of Hampstead. One of these 
two w(Aild seem to be the most probable derivation. 
Camden supposes it to be derived from the British 
lAang-dmcUf a city of ships ; Erasmus, from lAnduSj 
a city in Bhodes ; Maitland, horn Lon^ a plain, and 
Don, a hill; and Selden, from LUm-Dien, a temple 
of Diana. Tacitus, in his Annals, gives an account 
of the revolt of the British queen Boadicea, and 
speaks of Londomumy or Cohnia Atupista, as the 
chief residence of merchants, and the great mart of 
trade and commerce. It was probably called Atir 
gtuta by the Romans, from its being the capital of 
a conquered province, several of Uie continental 
cities having had the same appellation. Pennant 
says, that in the time of the Britons an immense fo- 
rest oriffhiaUy extended to the river side, and even as 
late as the reign of Henry IL ixwered tJie norHiem 
neighbourhood of the dty, and loas filled wiHk varUnts 
species of beasts of chase. It vtas defended naturally 
byfosseSy one formed by the creek which ran along 
Fleet ditch; the other, afterwards known by thai of 
Walbrook, The soutJt side loas guarded by the 



TlmmeSy the north they might think s^ufficienJly pro- 
tected by the adjacent forest. Wall-brook has now 
ceased to exist, and the Fleet ditch is arched over 
and used as a sewer. Under the sway of the Bo- 
mans, London increased in wealUi and importance ; 
and, although, when abandoned by the Bora&n 
general Suetonius Patilinns, it wasalmost destroyed 
by Boadicea, we find that, in the reign of the Em- 
peror Sevems, it was the metropolis of Britain, and 
in 359 there were 800 vessels employed in the port 
of London for the exportation of com alone. The 
original walk of I^ondon were probably founded by 
Constantino the Great, at the request of his mother 
Helena, for several coins of that empress have been 
found under them. Th^ oommepced at a ibrt on 
the site of the present Tower ef London, extending 
along the Minories to Houndsditch, Bishopsgate 
Churchyard, and Aldorsgate; thence to Christ- 
church Hospital, and Old Newgate ; then south to 
Ludgate, and by the side of Fleet Bro<^ to Bay- 
nard's Castle, another fort by the Thames; this 
circuit comprehended about two miles and a fur- 
long. The walls were high and strong, defended 
by towers, astd had four principal gates opening to 
the four great military roads. There are now few 
vestiges of it, the principal one being M the back 
of Ludgate Hill, and irr Oripplegate Churchyard. 
Numerous Komau romains of all kinds have at dif- 
ferent times been found in Loudon, attesting the 
grandeur of the works carried on here by that na- 
tion, and it is supposed by Whittakor that the first 
embankment of the lliameB is attributable to them. 
At the end of four centuries from Caesar's invasioB, 
the Romans were obliged to withdraw their forces 
from Britain, in consequence of the internal dis- 
turbances of the empire, and London again became 
a solely British town. It remained so until the 
establishment of the Saxon kingdom of Eesex, with 
the exception of a short period when it was pos- 
sessed by Hengist. When the East Saxons were 
converted to Christianity, London became the 
bishop's see, and the first cathedral church was 
erected on the site of the present St. Paul's. Me- 
litus, appointed in 604, was tlie first tttshop. 
During itkt heptarchy, liondon was injurad by 
frequent fires, the principal one ooourring in 798. 
In 833, after the union of the Saxon kingdom by 
Egbert, a wittenagemot or parliament was held here. 
Soon afterwards the city was plundered, and the 
inhabitants massacred, by the Danes, who also 
possessed it at the commencement of Alfred's 
reign, but were, in 834, driven away by that mo- 
narch, who strengthened tlib city, and laid the 
foundation of the present municipal government. 
The Saxons called it Lundenceastre, and afterwards 
Lundone. It was afterwards alternately possessed 
by the Danes and the Saxons, but it roust have 
greatly increased in opulenoe, for in the reigrn of Ed- 
mund Ironside, out of an impost of £83,000 Saxoa 
levied upon the English, London furnished £11,000. 
William, Duke of Normandy, after the defeat of Ha- 
rold in 1066, advanced to London, but was refused 
admission by the citizens, who had declared for 
Edgar Atheling. The two archbishops and the 
clergy having, however, declared in William's fa- 
vour, the opposition of the Londoners was removed, 
and on Christmas-day he was crowned King of 
England at Westminster. He granted the citi> 



■ zens a charter, which still exists in the city 
I archives, and is written in Saxon characters on a 
sh*p of parchment, six inches long and one broad ; 
the translation is as follows : Willuim the King 
grceteth William the Bishop^ and Godfrey the Port- 
rtetey and all the hunjeAscs within London, friendly. 
And T acquaint you thatlwiU that ye he aU there 
law-worthy, as ye were in King Edward's days. 
AndlwiU thai every chUd be his father's heir, after 
lui father's days. And I will not suffer that any 
man do you any torong. God preserve you. The 
city suffered severely by fire in 1077. In 1100, 
Henry I. granted a charter to it, with several im- 
portant privileges, one of which was the perpetual 
sberifiwick of Middlesex. During the contest 
between the Empress Maud and Stephen, the 
dtizens took part with the latter. In the reign 
of Henry II., large sums of money were extorted 
from them. From the account given of the city 
in this reign by Fitzstephen, a monk of Canter- 
bury, it would appear to have been opulent and 
prosperous, possessing, as he says, abundant wealth, 
great grandeur, cuid magnificence. On the corona- 
tion of Richard I., numbers of the Jews in London 
were massacred "by the brutal populace. In tho 
reign of this monarch, the chief magistrate of 
liondon, who had formerly been called a portreeve, 
and then a bailiff, had his title changed to that 
of mayor — Henry Fitz-Alwyn was the first who 
filled this office. Richard also granted the city 
two charters; for one of which, that of 1195-6, 
which provided for the removal of all weirs 
upon the Thames, he was paid £1,500. John 
granted the city several charters; but in tho 
latter part of bis reign, the Londoners took part 
with the barons against him. In Magna Charta 
it was stipulated that the city of London should 
have all its ancient privlUges, as well by land 
at by water. Henry III, granted nine charters 
to the citizens in the course of his reign. In 
1258, we learn from the Chronicles of Evesham, 
that corn was so dear that 20,000 persons died in 
London alone. In 1264, upwards of 500 Jews 
were massacred by the populace, who also de- 
stroyed their houses and synagogues. Under 
Edward I., the city was divided into twenty-four 
wards, an alderman being placed over each, and 
tbe great woodland of Middlesex was now dis- 
forested; but in this reign the houses were still built 
of wood, and roofed with straw or reeds. For the 
supply of water, there were twenty large leaden 
cisterns or conduits, which were placed under the 
charge of the lord mayor and aldermen, who, after 
visiting them on horseback, once every year, 
'* hunted a hare before dinner, and a fox after it, 
in the fields near St. Giles's." King Edward III., 
bv one of his charters, gi-anted Southwark to the 
citizens. From 1348 to about 1357, London was 
ravaged by a fearful pestilence, so that it was neces- 
sary to grant several pieces of ground without the 
walls for burial-places. In 1380 a desperate iu- 
surrection took place, which would have been 
attended with the most serious consequences to 
the prosperity of the metropolis, had it not been 
for the courage of the lord mayor, Sir William 
Walworth, who killed Wat Tyler, who had placed 
himself at the head of it; together with the intre- 
pidity of the young king, Richard II., who suc- 
roL. III. 



ceeded in pacifying the people, and restoring 
peace. Henry IV., who afterwards extended their 
privileges, was cordially welcomed by the citizens 
in 1399, after he had deposed Richard. It was 
iu tho reign of Henry V. that the city was first 
lighted at night by lanterns, slung across the 
street with wisps of rope or hay. In the reign of 
Henry VI., Jack Cade, having assumed the name 
of Mortimer, entered London at the head of a large 
body of insurgents, did much injury to the city, 
and* beheaded Lord Say, the lord treasurer, and 
some other persons of importance ; but on a gene- 
ral pardon being proclaimed, he was deserted by 
his followers, discovered and killed. In this 
reign the rent of houses in London increased from 
six and eightpence, to three pounds per annum. 
During the wars of the Roses, London was gene- 
rally favourable to the House of York, and Edward 
IV., after the battle of Bamet, knighted the mayor, 
recorder, and twelve of the aldermen. This reign 
is celebrated for the introduction of printing into 
London by William Caxton, citizen and mercer, 
and brick was now first used in the construction 
of houses. Soon after Henry VII. ascended the 
throne, the " sweating sickness," a peculiar epi- 
demic, raged in London with such violence, tliat 
two mayors and six aldcrmen,^side a great num- 
ber of their fellow-citizens, died of it in one week. 
In this reign a field for archers was formed at 
Finsbury, which is now the Artillery-ground. The 
king and his two agents, Empson and Dudley, 
exacted large sums of money from London; but 
Henry VI II., who had formed a design of raising 
money without the assL<tance of parliiiment, was 
prevented from carrying it into effect by the reso- 
lute opposition of the citizens. Many improve- 
ments were at this time made in tho city, and 
pavement was first laid down in the middle of 
the streets. The dis.solution of the m6nasteries 
effected a greai alteration in the appearance of the 
capital, from the number of religious foundations 
which it contained. The streets were still ex- 
tremely narrow, with heavy signs projecting from 
all the houses ; Erasmus tells us that the floors are 
commonly of day, strewed with ruslies, which are 
occasionally renewed: hut underneath lies unmo- 
lested an ancient collection of beer, grease, fragments 
of fish, &c., and everything thai is nasty. The Em- 
peror Charles V. visited Henry, and was magni- 
ficently received here by the citizens. The Bible 
was first priated in 1 542, but terrible persecutions 
on account of religion also took place in this reign, 
from which London suffered very severely. The 
reign of Edward VI. was remarkable, as far as 
relates to London, for tlie foundation of several 
charities ; and in the seventh year of this reign, 
an act was passed for tho regulation of taverns 
and public-houses, by which it was decreed that 
there should be only forty in the city and liberties 
of London, and three in Westminster. The dread- 
ful religious persecutions which took place during 
the reign of Mary are too well known to be fur- 
ther alluded to, and it may but snfiice to say, that 
Smithficld became a continual Aceldama. During 
the reign of Elizabeth, the metropolis increased in 
size, prosperity, opulence, and population. The 
queen and her advisers looked with such dread on 
the increase of buildings and population, that, by 



a decree of 1580, it was forbidden to erect new 
buildings where none had before existed in the 
memory of man. The lord treasurer was of opin- 
ion, that the growth of the metropolis encouraged 
the increase of ike plague^ created a trouble in 
governing 8uch mvUitvdet^ a dearth of victuals, 
muUipb/ing of heggars, and inahUity to relieve 
them; an increase of artisans more than could 
live together, impoverishing other cities for lack 
of inhabitants. It made lack of air, lack of 
room to walk, to shoot, dhc; and increase of peo- 
ple to rob the queen's customs. At this period 
the houses were mostly of wood, with one story 
projecting over the other. From Newgate Street, 
Cheapside, and Comhill, to the banks of the 
Thames, was the most populous part of the city. 
From Lothbury to Bishopgate, and from Bishop- 
gate to the Tower, there were only a few scattered 
houses, with the exception of Coleman Street. 
Goodman's Fields were pasture grounds, and there 
were not many buildings cast of the Tower. 
Whitechapel was merely lined by a few houses, 
and Houndsditch was a street which ran into the 
fields. From Bishopgate to Moorfields and Fins- 
bury, there were no buildings; Chiswell Street 
and Whitecross Street were hardly connected. 
Clerkenwell contained very few buildings besides 
the monastery and the church. There was a street 
from Holbom Bridge to Red Lion Street, beyond 
which was an open road to the village of St. Giles, 
having a few houses on the right hand. Oxford 
Road had trees and hedges on both sides, and from 
thence to Piccadilly was a road which passed 
through Hedge Lane and the Haymarket to St. 
James's hospital, now the palace, there being no 
houses on either side of it. Leicester Square was 
open fields, and there were very few buildings 
above St. Martin's Church. The Convent Garden 
extended as a garden to Drury Lane. The Strand 
consisted entirely of noblemen's mansions, the 
sites of which are still pointed out by the names 
of the streets. Spring Gardens extended to the 
present Treasury, where the cock-pit and tilt- 
yard then stood. There were streets from King 
Street to the Abbey, and several houses about 
Abingdon Street. On the opposite side of the 
river there were a few unconnected houses from 
Lambeth Palace to the banks of the river, opposite 
Whitefriars, where there was a line of houses con- 
tinued to Winchester Street, in Southwark. Op- 
posite Queenhithe were the circular buildings for 
bull and bear baitings. Southwark did not extend 
to the end of the High Street. Along Tooley 
Street to Horsleydown were several houses, but 
London Bridge was covered with buildings. Num- 
bers of emigrants being driven to England from 
the Continent, came to London ; and the houses 
of the lower orders were crowded to a fHghtful 
extent, producing disease and pestilence, so that, 
in 1603, as many as 30,000 persons died of the 
plague in London. In vain were restrictions put 
upon building ; the suburbs of London increased 
rapidly, and have gone on doing so to the present 
time. Commerce', at that time, fiourished in the 
metropolis. The citizens raised and paid for 
10,000 men, and supplied 16 ships with their 
equipments, to aid Elizabeth against the Spanish 
Armada. In 1609, the Irish province of Ulster 



having become the property of the crown, James 
presented it to the city, on condition that they 
should establish an English colony there. They 
did so, and within seven years the towns of Lon- 
donderry and Coleraine were erected. In this 
reign, London was first paved with flag stones, and 
Sir Hugh Middleton directed the course of the 
New River from Ware to London. In the begin- 
ning of the reign of Charles I., the plague again 
returned to London, destroying 35,000 persons. 
The High Commission and the Star Chamber being 
situated in London, the citizens more particularly 
felt their evil effects, and of course sided with the 
parliament in the ensuing civil war. During the 
Commonwealth London still continued to increase, 
notwithstanding another proclamation intended to 
prevent it. In 1665, London suffered fearfully 
from the Great Plague, which commenced in De- 
cember, 1664, and did not entirely cease till the 
January of the following year. Whole streets of 
families were swept away. Law proceedings were 
entirely suspended, the inns of court were closed, 
and such was the state of public business in the 
city, that grass grew in the Royal Exchange, and 
in the principal streets. The whole number of 
deaths, as given in the bills during that year, was 
97,306, and that is supposed to fall short of the 
actual number, as a large proportion of the deaths 
could not have been regidarly recorded. On the 
morning of Sunday, September 2, 1666, the Great 
Fire broke out in the heart of the metropolis, raged 
for four days and nights, and destroyed almost 
five-sixths of the city within the walls, and cleared 
a large area without the walls. The houses being 
chiefly built of wood, and the conflagration being 
impelled by strong winds, scarcely a building 
within range of the flames escaped, and the space 
of ground cleared by the fire was equal to an 
oblong of upwards of a mile long, and half a mile 
broad. It was estimated that property was de- 
stroyed to the amount of about £10,000,000. This 
fire, however, proved a great blessing to the me- 
tropolis, for the city was rebuilt within three or 
four years, in a style of much greater convenience, 
healthfullness, and regularity than before. In the 
reign of Charles II., and in that of James, his suc- 
cessor, many of the noblemen's mansions in the 
Strand made way for those shops and houses it now 
contains ; and one year before the abdication of the 
latter monarch. Long-acre, Seven-dials, Soho, and 
Spitalfields, were built and colonized by upwards 
of 13,000 French protestants, who came to Eng- 
land in consequence of the revocation of the edict 
of Nantes. London played a prominent part in the 
revolution of 1688-9, and her citizens were the 
foremost to invite and to support the Prince of 
Orange, and to facilitate the great and beneficial 
change which then took place in the government 
of the country. William re-established the whole 
of the ancient rights of the city of London, which 
had been taken from them in former reigns. In 
1692, when William was in Holhind, £200,000 
was borrowed from the city by his queen, Mary. 
In 1697, the privilege of sanctuary, then existing 
in various parts of the metropolis, which, of course, 
became places of refuge for yice and dishonesty, 
was suppressed, with the exception of that in the 
Mint, which lasted till the reign of George I. In 



1703, daring tlie ragn of Anne, propertf to the 
ftmonnt of £2,000,000 was destroyed in London 
alone by a dreadftd storm of wind. In 1711 «n 
aet was passed for the building of fifty new places 
of worship in the metropolis, the expense to be de- 
frayed by a small daty on coals bnraght into the 
port of London. Glass globnlar lamps were intro- 
duced at this period. Parish engines were estab- 
fished, 6t. Paul's cathedral was completed, and 
the metropf^s greatly enlarged and improTed. 
During the reign of George II., Fleet ditch 
waa arched orer, and new and handsome roads 
replaced mean and dirty streets in many parts 
of tlie city. During the reign of George III. 
the paying was improred, and names were 
placed at the comers of the streets. A. dangerous 
insurrection broke out in 1780, on the occasion of 
a petitioii to parliament from the Protestant Asso- 
oiation. The populace burnt the prisons of New- 
gate, the King's Bench, and the Fleet, and liberat- 
ed the prisoners; they also set fire to the places of 
worship, and several of the dwellings, of the Roman 
Catholics. The military then interfered, several 
of the rioters were killed, and some of them were 
tried, convicted, and executed. Lord George Gor- 
don was subsequently tried for having at first eol- 
H^ted the assemblage in St. George's Fields, but 
was acquitted. In 1814, London was visited by 
the allied sovereigns, who were entertained with 
the greatest magnificence by the lord mayor and 
corporation at the GuildhalL In 1834 the houses 
of parliament were burnt down ; and in 1838 the 
Royal Exchange was burnt down. During the 
last few years the metropolis has wonderfully in- 
creased in size, and new roads, streets, and 
squaree, are -still continually rising up In every 
direction. Several villages, which not long ago 
were at some distance from London, are now 
joined to it; and among them may be mentioned 
tkoee of PkddSngton, Kensing^p, Gamberwell, 
Bow, Islington, fibmpstead, and Highgate. Such 
IS a brief suaunaiy of the history of Ibis great 
metrepolis. 

XATUSAL DIVISION OP LOKPOJV. 

London may be divided into five principal por- 
tions—'the West End, the City, the East End, 
Weetmiiistor, and the Borough. The West End 
oonsistschiefly of handsome squares and streets, con- 
taining town residenees of the aristocracy, and 
streets ooataining the handsomest tfnd most iSuhion- 
aUe shops. • The City, whieh is the most ancient 
part of the metropolis, oontains the offices of mer- 
ehants and banken, and of those oenneeted with 
oommeice, together with numbers of warehouses 
and shops. The East End of the town is filled 
with shops of every deecriptioD, and numbers ef 
the inhabitants are oonneoled with the various 
branches of manufactures, and ship-building, 
flonthwark and Lambeth, and the whole of the 
aontheni bank of the Thames, abound with innu- 
merable manufactories of all descriptions, iron- 
foundries, glass-houses^ soap-boiling and dye 
houses, shot and l£at manufaetories, Inwweries, 
Ac; the woritmen belonging to tiiem chiefly reside 
in the vicinity* Bnt there are here also several 
handsome sqnares and streets, particularly St. 
GeMge's Fields; and there ars also numerous 



small and unhealthy courts and alleys, tenanted 
by the families of the poor, which, from their damp 
situation, and, generally speaking, filthy condition, 
give rise to and encourage the spread of all kinds 
of pestilential disease. Westminster contains the 
parks, the palaces, the houses of pariiament, the 
abbey, the l{^ courts, and the goyemment offices. 
To the north of the metropolis an entirely new 
town has sprung up, called Camden or Kentish 
Town, containing several fine squares and streets, 
&c. There are two principal thoroughfares or 
ranges of streets in London, one at the north, and 
the other at the south, nearer the river. The 
former commences at Bayswater, and passes 
through Oxford Street, which is 1,920 yards in 
length, New Oxford Street, Holborn, Skinner 
Street, Newgate Street, Cheapside, Comhill, Lead- 
enhall Street, and Whitechapel to Mile-end, form- 
ing a continued broad and handsome thoroughfare 
of about eight miles in length. The southern 
range of streets commences at Westminster Abbey 
and the Houses of Parliament, passes along Par- 
liament Street and Whitehall, the Strand and Fleet 
Street, which, together, extend for 1,909 yards, 
up Ludgate Hill to St. Paul's, where it joins the 
former thoroughfare at Cheapside, or, keeping a 
southern course, passes through Watling Street, 
Canon Street, and East Cheap, to the Tower. The 
most beautiful street in London is Regent Street, 
which intersects Oxford Street, and passes in a 
southerly direction to Pall Mall and Charing 
Cross. Other great thoroughfares intersect and 
unite these in every direction. Each of these 
immense thoroughfares, it should be remem- 
bered, is several miles in length, lined with 
dwellings of the most valuable description, em- 
bellished with magnificent shops and warehouses, 
filled to repletion with the most costly articles of 
merchandise, being at intervals, sometimes fre- 
quently, adorned with public buildings of the noblest 
character. Most of the other streets would be 
considered remarkable in most of the other capi- 
tals of Europe. London now contains upwards of 
160 squares, and 10,000 streets, lanes, rows, &c. ; 
the houses in which are not far short of 250,000. 
All the streets are well and regularly paved, and 
have a footpath laid with flags, with a reg^ular 
curb-stone, raised some inches above the carriage- 
way. The modem streets are all of them wide, 
and extremely commodious. London is supplied 
with water by several extensive joint-stock com- 
panies, but the subject of water supply is at pre- 
sent under the consideration of the government. 
The drainage of the metropolis is also the subject 
of mu<^ discussion ; and from the plans which 
have been proposed, it appears prolutble that it 
win be greatly improved, and rendered much more 
efficient than it has hitherto been. The streets 
and shops are well lighted with gas by various 
companies. 

XOCUESIASnCAL JUBISDICnOV. 

London was, in ancient times, an archbishopric, 
and had a jurisdiction extending over the greater 
part of England ; but, in 604, it was constituted 
a bishopric, Melitus, the abbot of a monastery at 
Rome, being the first bishop. The diocese com* 
prises the archdeaconries of London, Middlesex, 



Colchester, Egsex, and St. Alban's, and contains 
about 640 benefices, iuclusive of sinecure rectories, 
but cxclusiye of benefices annexed to other prefer- 
ments: the average gross income of incumbents 
is about £418: the total amount of the avera^^c 
gross yearly income of the sec is about £15,130: 
net yearly income, £13,930. By an order in 
council, of June, 1837, the ecclesiastical commis- 
sioners "were empowered to fix the average income 
of the bishop at £10,000 per annum ; at the next 
avoidance of the sec, or by consent of the bishop, 
this is the sum fixed for the payment of the new 
diocesan of London. The average yearly income 
of the dean and chapter of the cathedral is £ 11 , 1 50 ; 
net yearly income about £9,000. There are other 
dignitaries of the church — wardens, canons, pre- 
bendaries, &c. — who have separate revenues. The 
dean and chapter have houses to reside in. 

PUBLIC BUILDIKOB. 

St. Paul's Cathedral is situated upon the sum- 
mit of Ludgate Hill, and the site of St. Paul's 
Churchyard is supposed to be the oldest ground built 
upon in London. It is probable that it was anciently 
a burial-ground of the Britons, and afterwards of the 
Saxons, for Sir Christopher Wren, when digging 
for a foundation to the present edifice, discovered 
several wooden pins with which the Britons fas- 
tuned their winding-sheets, and also several of the 
Saxon stone graves. Beside these, there were in- 
dications of a Christian church having been built 
here in the time of the Romans, although Sir 
Christopher completely disproves the assertion 
made by some authorities, that there was a temple 
to Diana. The first church is supposed to have 
been destroyed during the Dioclesian persecution, 
but was soon rebuilt. It was again destroyed by 
the Saxons, and again restored, according to Bedo, 
by King Ethelbert, about the year 610. It was 
burnt down in the reign of William the Conqueror, 
in 1086, when Mauritius, then bishop of London, 
began to ro-ercct it in a style of great magnifi- 
cence. Additions continued to bo made to the 
structure until the year 1315. This cathedral, 
which was principally in the Gothic stylo of archi- 
tecture, with a very lofty spire, was afterwards 
added to, and altered in various ways, but was 
almost entirely destroyed by the great fire in 
1666. The celebrated Paul's Cross stood on the 
north side of the church, and it was here that the 
citizens assembled, in former times, in general 
convention, for the election of magistrates, and for 
public deliberation. A pulpit was afterwards at- 
tached to it, in which sermons were preached, and 
proclamations, &c., were also made from it. Stow 
describes it as a puJpit cross of timber, mounUd 
vjxm steps of stone^ and covered with lead. Pennant 
tells us, that hefore this cross, in 1483, tocu brought, 
divested of all splendour, Jane Sliore, tJie charitable, 
Hie merry eoncub'ine of Edioard the Fourth., and, 
after his death, tJie favourite of Lord Hastings. 
It was totally destroyed during the civil wars of 
Charles I. A house for the bishop once stood on 
the spot now occupied by London House Yard. 
Underneath the cathedral was the subterranean 
church of St. Faitlv, which, says Brayley, was 
originally a dlHinct building, standing near tJie east 
end of JS'. Paid's ; but when the old cathedral was 



enlarged, between the years 1256 and 1312| it VNu 
taken down, and cm. extensive pari of the vauUs was 
appropriated to the use of the parishioners of St, Faith, 
in lieu of the demolisJted fabric. After the great fire, 
an ineffectual attempt was made to restore the old 
cathedral ; but as this was found impossible, Sir 
Christopher Wren was intrusted with the design- 
ing and the erection of an entirely new edifice, 
for which he received the trifling pittance of £200 
a year. The erection of the building cost alto- 
gether one million and a half. The first stone was 
laid on the 21st June, 1675, and the last was laid 
at the top of the lantern in 1710 : thus the erection 
of this magnificent and noble edifice occupied 
thirty-five years. It is a cruciform structure of 
Portland stone, built after the model of St. Peter's 
at Kome, to which, in some respects, it is superior. 
The facade on Uie west, towards Ludgate Hill, is 
noble in the exti-eme. A cast-iron balustrade, 
standing on a dwarf stone wall, and weighing 
about 200 tons, surrounds the cathedral, and sepa- 
rates the churchyard from the street, which it has 
recently been proposed to remove, and to throw 
open the area, but the proposition is for the pre- 
sent negatived. A marble statue of Queen Anno, 
holding the insignia of royalty, and with the 
allegorical figures of Great Britain, Ireland, 
France, and America, stands within the enclosure 
opposite the west front. The interior of the 
cathedral is 500 feet in length from east to west ; 
it is paved with square slabs of marble, alter- 
nately black and white, the floor of the altar being 
interspersed with porphyry. Within the south- 
west pier there is a circular staircase to the Whis- 
pering Gallery, which encircles the edge of the 
cornice of the lower part of the dome. A splendid 
view is here obtained of the church, the cupola, and 
the lantern, and particularly of Sir James Thomhill's 
fine paintings on the compartments of the dome, 
illustrating the most prominent events in the life 
of St. Paul. The name of the Whispering Gallery 
is derived from the celebrated reverberation ox 
sounds obtained in it, the softest whisper being 
loudly and clearly beard at a distance of 100 feet, 
which is the diameter of the dome at this part. 
The same staircase leads to the galleries above the 
north and south aisles' of the nave, which contain 
the library and model-room. Bishop Compton, 
whose portrait is seen here, gave a collection of 
books to this library ; but the principal cariosity is 
the flooring, which consists of 2,000 pieces of oak. 
A room in the north g^lery contains a beautiful 
model of the altar-piece that was intended for the 
east end of the church, and a large model for this 
building in the Grecian style. There axe also 
some of the funeral decorations used at the inter- 
ment of Lord Nelson. The clockworks are ex- 
tremely curious : the pendulum is 14 feet in length, 
and has 1 cwt. at the end ; the minute-hands on 
the exterior dials are 8 feet long, and weigh 75 
pounds each ; the hour-hands are 5 feet 5 inches 
long, and weigh 44 pounds each. The bell is 10 
feet in diameter, and weighs 4^ tons ; it can easily 
be distinguished from any other in the metropolis 
from the peculiar fineness of its tones, and has been 
heard at a distance of twenty miles ; it is tolled on 
the death of any member of the royal family, of 
the lord mayor, bishop of London, or dean of the 




I 



cathedral. The ball and ctobs were re-erected in < 
1822, and the whole of the copperwork, which 
weighs about 4 tons, is 27 feet in height; it 
will oontain eight persons. The cathedral con- 
tained no monnments till the year 1790, when it 
was suggested that the appearance of the interior 
of the edifice would be improTod by the introduc- 
tion of monuments and statues to the memory of 
the illustrioQB dead. The first erected was to the 
memory of the philanthropist, John Howard. The 
monament to Lord Nelson was the work of Flax- 
man. Lord Nelson's i-emains are interred in a vault 
beneath the central part of the cathedral ; his body 
was buried with great pomp and magnificence on 
tike 9th January, 1806. Among other monnments 
to illustrious persons erected in this cathedral, may 
be mentioned those to Sir W. Jones, by Bacon, 
jnn. ; Earl Howe, and Sir Joshoa Reynolds, by 
Fiaxman : Sir John Moore, Lord Colling wood. Sir 
Ralph Abercromby, Lord Duncan, and Sir Isaac 
Brock, by Westmacott ; General Dnndas, General 
PoQsonby, General Pioton, Lord St. Vincent, Mar- 
qnts Comwallis, Lord Heathfield, Dr. Johnson (with 
an inscription by Dr. Parr), Middleton, Bishop of 
Oftlcutta, Bishop Heber, Dr. Babington, General 
Gillespie, &c. Above the entrance to the choir is 
a marble slab, with a Latin epitaph to Sir Christo- 
pher Wren, by his son ; it is as follows : 

" Subtus eonditur 
Hnjofl eoclesite et urbis candHoTf 

Ch. Wren; 
Qui vixit annos nltra nonaginta, 

Non Bibi Bcd bono publico. 

Leotor, si nKmumentum reqalria^ 

Gircumsploe." 

The vaults beneath the church oontain the bodies 
of Sir Christopher Wren, Sir Joshua Reynolds, B. 
West, Esq., and Sir Thomas Lawrence; James 
Barry, John Opie, Henry Foseli, and John Rennie, 
Esqrs^ besides other eminent persons. In the 
centre avenue of the crypt, beneath the cathedral, 
vnder the centre of the dome, stands the tomb of 
Nelson ; it consists of a sarcophagus of black and 
white marble, supported by a pedestal with the in- 
scription : Horatio Vise. Nelsok. Tlie sarcopha- 
gus and pedestal were removed here from Windsor, 
from the tomb-house of Cardinal Wolsey, who had 
prepared them for himself. The celebrated figure 
of Dr. Donne is also deposited here ; it represents 
hiin as a corpse, and was executed by his own order 
in his lifetime. This grand and noble building 
occupies a piece of ground, 2 acres, 16 perches, and 
70 feet in extent ; its height from the vaults to the 
summit of the cross is 404 feet, and from the cen- 
tre of the floor to the summit of the cross is 340 
feet ; exclusive of the dome, it is 110 feet in height ; 
it is 2,292 feet in drcumferenoe; its breadth from 
north to south, through the transept, is 285 feet, 
and the breadth of the nave and the choir is 100 feet. 
The place of worship which stands next to St. 
Paul's in point of importance, celebrity, and gran- 
deur, is Westminster Abbey, which is dedicated to 
the apostle Peter. There are various wonderful 
stories told by monkish writers concerning tho 
foundation of this edifice on Thomey Island^ but 
Sir Christopher Wren, who was appointed to sur- 
vey it, could discover nothing in proof of its ever 
having been a pagan temple. According to most 
authorities it was commenced in the sixth century. 



and Bebert is supposed to have completed that por- 
tion of it which at present forms the east angle. 
It afterwards suffered severely, in common witli all 
other religious edifices, from the frequent incur- 
sions of the barbarians ; but in the reign of Edward 
the Confessor, the old ruins were cleared away, 
and a magnificent cruciform structure was erected ; 
all the former endowments were confirmed by that 
prince, and the privileges of the priesthood greatly 
extended. Henry III. enlarged the abbey, and 
added a' chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin ; 
and Henry VII., in 1502, commenced the erection 
of the beautiful structure attached, which is known 
by his name. From this time till the accession of 
William III. the abbey became negle<;ted, and was 
much injured during the parliamentary war. In 
that reign, however, parliament voted a large sum 
for the beautifying and repairing it, the charge of 
doing which was intrusted to Sir Christopher 
Wren, who well and ably performed his task, and 
added the two towers at the western entrance. 
The abbey measures 416 feet from east to west, 
exclusive of Henry VII.*s Chapel ; the height of 
the west towers is 225 feet. The splendid Gothic 
portico leading to the north cross has been sur- 
named the Beautiful, or Solomon's Gate ; it is 
adorned by a handsome window. The appearance 
of the interior is strikingly grand and impressive. 
There is a curious mosaic pavement in front of 
the altar, said to have been executed by Richard 
de Ware, abbot of Westminster. The south of the 
choir contains the curious ancient monuments to 
Sebert, founder of the abbey, and Anne of Cleves ; 
and the north, those to Aymer de Valence, Earl of 
Pembroke, his Coimtess, and Edmund Crouch - 
back. Earl of Lancaster. At the back of the 
altar, to the east of the choir, stands Edward the 
Confessor's Chapel, containing the shrine of St. 
Edward, a most exquisite piece of workmanship, 
executed by Pietro Cavalini, in the reign of Henry 
III.; the tomb of Edith, the queen of Edward; 
that of Henry III., Edward I., &c. The iron 
sword of Edward I., part of his shield, the helmet 
and shield of Henry V., may also bo seen here, 
together with the coronation chairs; the most 
ancient of which was brought from Scone, in Scot- 
land, by Edward I., in 1297, with the rest of the 
regalia of that country. Beneath the seat of it is 
the stone said to have been Jacob's pillow. The 
other was made expressly for Mary, William III.'s 
consort. There is here a curiously ornamented 
screen, and a defaced brass figure of John de 
Waltham, bishop of Salisbury in 1383. To the 
east of the abbey is situated Henry Vll.'s Chapel, 
which was commenced in 1502, the first stone 
having been laid by John Islip, abbot of Westmin- 
ster, in presence of the king. It was completed 
in about ten years, at an expense of £14,000 ; it 
was entirely repaired by the parliament, between 
1809 and 1823, at an expense of £42,000. This 
chapel was erected by Henry as a sepulchre for him- 
self and his successors ; and he ordered in his will 
that none but those of the blood-royal should be in- 
terred here : thus none have been hitherto admitted 
who were not closely allied to royalty. The north 
aisle contains the monuments of Queen Elizabeth, 
her sister Mary, the murdered princes, Edward V. 
and his brother Richard, and others of the blood- 



royaL The sontli aisle contains tlie monuments of 
Mary Queen of Scots, Catherine Lady Walpole, 
Margaret Countess of Richmond, mother of Heniy 
VII., George and Christopher Monk, first *nd 
second Dukes of Alhexnarle. There is also a monu- 
ment with an effigy to the memory of Margaret 
Douglas, who died March 10, 1577, and who was 
nearly related, as the inscription informs us, to 
four kings of England and two of Scotland, and to 
five queens of Scots and two queens of England. 
In the royal vault are interred Charles II., William 

III. and his consort Mary, Queen Anne, and Prince 
George. All the monuments in this chapel are 
beautifully executed, but the principal one is that 
of Henry YII. and his queen Elizabeth. In the 
nave of the chapel is performed the ceremony 
of the instalment of the knights of the most hon- 
ourable Order of the Bath, which was reriyed in 
1725 by George I. George II. erected a fine vault 
under Henry YII.'s Chapel as the burying-plaoe 
of the royal family. To the east of the abbey 
there is a small entrance leading to Poet's Cor- 
ner, BO called from the number of monuments 
there erected to celebrated British poets. Suf- 
fice it to mention William Shakspeare, Richard 
Brinsley Sheridan (whose monument consists 
merely of a black marble alab), Ben Jonson, 
Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Mason, Gray, Prior, 
Granville Sharp, Mrs. Pritchard, Thomson, Mrs. 
Rowe, Gay, and Oliver Goldsmith ; above the en- 
trance to the chapel of St. Blaize — Handel, Cham- 
bers, Addison, Dr. Hales, Sir J. Pringle, Sir S. 
Taylor, Wyatt, Grabius, Casaubon, Garrick, Dry- 
den, Cowley, Davenant, Camden, Cougreve, Gif- 
ford, &c., &c. A minute detail of the various 
beautiful monuments in other parts of the abbey 
would be impossible. This fine old abbey is 383 
feet long between the walls ; 203 feet broad at the 
transept ; the nave is 166 feet long, 39 broad, and 
102 feet high; the choir is 156 feet long, and 28 
broad ; each of the aisles are 17 feet in breadth. 
Several of the ancient appurtenances of the abbey 
still exist adjoining the church. The cloisters 
contain several monuments ; they are quadrangu- 
lar, and have piazzas towards the conrt, in which 
are the houses of some of the prebendaries. The 
Chapter-house was erected in 1250, and is entered 
on one side of the cloisters through a beautifully 
carved Gothic portal. The Commons of Great 
Britain held their parliaments in this place, with 
the consent of the abbot, from 1377 to 1547, when 
Edward VI. granted them the chapel of St. Ste^ 
phen. It is now filled with the public records, 
among which is the celebrated Doomsday-book. 
There is a curious crypt beneath the chapter-house, 
the walls of which are 18 feet thick, and the 
roof is supported by a hollow short round pillar, 
from which diverge several massy ribs. The Jeru- 
salem Chamber, erected by Lillington as a part of 
the abbot's residence, is the place in which Henry 

IV. expired; he fell into a swoon while praying 

before St. Edward's shrine, and was carried to this 

chamber, when asking where he was, on being 

told, he answered, to use the words put into his 

mouth by Shakspeare : 

" Laud be to God I —even here my life most ead. 
It hath been prophesied to m^ many yean 
I should not die bat In Jerusalem, 
Which vainly I aupyoBed tlie Holy LtaAJ' 



Near the abbey was the sanctuaiy, a plaoo in 
which in ancient times certain criminals were 
sheltered; it had a church belcmging to it, and 
was probably erected by the Confessor. Edwaxd 
V. was bom here. The Eleemosynary, or Al- 
monry, where the alms of the abbey were distri- 
buted, was situated to the west of the sanctuary ; 
this is celebrated as the place where the first 
printing press used in England was erected, in 
1474. William Caxton, under the patronage of 
the abbot, Thomas Milling, then produced the first 
book ever printed in this kingdom, entitled, Tie 
Game and Flay of the Ghene. There is divine 
service every day in the abbey, at tea in the 
morning, and at three in the afternoon. On the 
north side of the abbey stands Bt Margaret's 
church, which unfortunately intercepts the view 
of the cathedral, and of Hewy VII.'s chapel : it 
was erected by Edward the Confessor, was reboilt 
in the reign <3f Edward I., and has since been fine- 
qnently repaired. There is a handsome basso 
rilievo above the altar table, representing oar 
Saviour and the disciples at Emmaus. The splen- 
did window was intended as a present, from the 
magistrates of Dost in Holland, to Henry VI I^ 
but on the death of that monarch it was set iq> in 
Waltham Abbey; after the dissolution of that 
monastery it passed through various hands, 
amongst others, those of the celebrated Greneral 
Monk, and in 1758 it was sold by Mr. Conyers of 
Copt Hall to the inhabitants of St. Margaret's, for 
400 guineas ; it is a representation of the cmci- 
fixion. The church is 130 feet long, ^ broad, 
and 45 high, and has ten excellent bells. At the 
end of one of the side aisles, there is a tablet with 
this inscription: Within the toaUs of this dhcreft 
wu deponied the body of the great Sir WaUer 
Baieigh, KaL, on the day he was beheaded in Old 
Falaee Tard^ Wtetmneter, October 18, Ann. Dom. 
1618 :-- 

** Reader, Aontd von reflect on Ms erron^ 
Bemanbar Ms many virtues, 
And that he was a mortaL" 

Betoming to St. Paul's cathedral, as the most 
central portion of the metropolis, to the north of 
the churchyard we find Paternoster Eow, so csUed 
from having been the place where the makers of 
paternosters or rosaries formerly resided; it is bow 
almost entirely occupied by publishers and book> 
sellers* In Pannier Alley, between this and New- 
gate Street, is a piece of sculpture, representing a 
boy on a pannier, with this inscription beneath it : 

" Wben ye have Bought 
The oitty round. 
Yet still this is 
The highest g^und. 
AvKVSt tlie 27, 
1086." 

Near St Paul's, on the nordi-west, is St Martin's 
le Grand, in which stands the Qeneral Post Office, 
a fine bandBome building of the Grecian Ionic 
order, which was commenced in 1825, from de- 
signs by R. Smirke, Esq., and completed in 1829. 
The entire building is of brick, faced with Port- 
land stone, except the basement, which is of gra- 
nite ; it is 400 feet in length, and 80 in depth, 
and has a portico 70 feet in breadth, and 20 is 
depth. In the centre of the edifice is the vesti- 
bule or great haU, used as a public thoronghfrrs. 



LON 



79 



LON 






Almost opposite the Poet Office is the Money 
Order Office, a handsome and commodious build- 
ing, In which business is carried on precisely 
as in a banking-house, for the receipt and trans- 
mission of small sums of money through the 
medium of the Post Office. In King Street, lead- 
ing from Cheapside, in an easterly direction from 
the Post Office, stands the Guildhall, which was 
erected in 1411, but entirely burnt down by the 
Great Fire, with the exception of the interior of 
the porch and the walls of the hall. The front, 
erected in 1789, is Gothic, and has three diyi- 
sions, with fluted pilasters between them. The 
fine stone hall is 153 feet long, 48 broad, and 55 
feet high, and can contain from 6,000 to 7,000 
persons ; it is used for the city banquets, election 
of members of parliament and dty officers, &c. 
This room contains monuments erected to the 
memory of Lord Nelson, and the two celebrated 
statesmen, Wm. Pitt and the Earl of Chatham ; 
Beckford, lord mayor in 1763 and 1770: besides 
statues of Edward YI., Elizabeth, and Charles I. 
There is a flight of steps opposite the entrance to the 
hall, leading to the Chamberlain's Office } the Com- 
mon Council Chamber, a handsome room, adorned 
with scTeral fine painting^ and pieces of sculpture; 
and the Court of Aldermen. The City Library, which 
adjoins the Guildhall, has a valuable collection of 
books; and next to it is the City Museum. To 
the right of the Guildhall, in King Street, are the 
Courts of Law for the city, which are ornamented 
with several portraits of the judges^ On the oppo- 
site side of the road is the Justice Hall, where one 
of the aldermen sits daily. Opposite King Street, 
in Cheapside, is the church of St. Mary-le-Bow, 
which was erected in 1673 by Sir C. Wren, upon 
the site of a former one, erected in 1087, the crypt 
of which still remains; it derived its name from 
its having been erected on arcboA The present 
edifice has a steeple 200 feet high. The bishops 
of London are consecrated here, and here are 
preached the eight lectures instituted by Dr. Boyle. 
Mercers' Hall, in Cheiq»ide, has a highly onui^ 
mented facade, with figures of Faith, Hope, and 
Charity ; it contains some curious memorials of the 
fiunons Whittington. Saddlers' Hall, a handsome 
edifice, also in Cheapside, was rebuilt in 1823. 
Grocers' Hall is situated in the Poultry, in a court 
of the same name ; it is a fine building, with a 
stone faQade, surrounded with emblematical ficulp- 
tnres, and contains some good portraits. The 
Chapel in the Poultry occupies the site of the old 
Compter-prison. At the eastern extremity of the 
Poultry, between that and Comhill, is situated the 
Mansion-house, the official residence of the lord 
mayor, which was erected in 1739, from designs 
by Dance the elder. It is an extensive oblong 
edifice of Portland^ stone, with a wide and lofty 
portico, which has six fluted Corinthian pillars, 
and a flight of steps to the principal entrance ; the 
pediment of the portico is ornamented with a piece 
of seulptnre, designed by Sir R. Taylor, emblema- 
tio of the (^mlence and grandeur of the city. This 
building contains some spacious and splendid 
apartments, particularly the Egyptian Hall, the 
Hall Boom, &c Near the Mansion-house stands 
// the Church of St. Stephen's, Walbrook, by many 
// Persons considered ike masterpiece of Sir C. 









Wren, who erected it after the destruction of 
the older one by the Fire of London : the struc- 
ture is simple on the outside, but the in- 
terior is extremely beautiful ; the dome, springing 
from the intersection, rests upon eight arches, 
supported by the same number of Corinthian co- 
lumns ; above the altar is a fine painting of the 
interment of St. Stephen, by West. It has just 
been restored according to the drawifigs of 
Sir C. Wren. Opposite the Mansion-house, in 
Threadneedle Street, stands the pile of build- 
ings in which is carried on the business of the 
Bank of England. It was erected at difierent 
periods by different architects, but the principal 
portion of the present building is the work of Sir 
J. Soane, and has been erected since 1738; though 
low, it is singularly elegant in appearance, and is 
justly considered one of the best arranged places 
in the world for the transaction of business. The 
stream called Walbrook anciently flowed over part 
of the ground on which it stands, so that counter- 
arches were constructed beneath the walls. The 
buildings form an angular area, the exterior wall 
of which measures 365 feet on the front, or south 
side, 440 feet on the west side, 410 feet on the 
north side, and 245 feet on the east side. The 
principal rooms are the Rotunda, or circular apart- 
ment, which has a beautiful and elegant dome, 57 
feet in diameter, and is chiefly used by stockhold- 
er^; and the Drawing Office, which has recently 
been remodelled by Codtrel, and is perhaps the finest 
office in London. The clock is an ingenious piece 
of mechanism, indicating the time on sixteen 
different dials; it is wound up. twice a week.- 
Merchant Tailors' Hall, also in Threadneedle 
Street) is one of the largest in London, and con- 
tains some valuable portraits, together with the 
charter granted to the company by Henry YII. 
The South Sea House, which stands near it, is a 
handsome Doric structure, enclosing a quadrangle 
surmounted by a piazza, with Tuscan pillars ; the 
apartments are convenient and elegant. On Com- 
hbl, near the Bank, is the Boyal Exchange, which 
was originally founded by Sir Thomas Gresham in 
1566, and was totally destroyed by the Great Fire; 
it was rebuilt by Mr. Hawkesmoor in 1688, at a 
cost of £80,000, and was again burnt down in 
January, 1838. The present structure was then 
erected from designs by William Tite, £sq.,F.R.&, 
the first stone having been laid by H. R. H. Prince 
Albert, on the 1 7th July, 1842,and the building was 
opened by Her Majesty Queen Victoria, on the 28th 
of October, 1844. It is by far the most magnificent 
structure for the purpose in the world, and looks 
more like the palace of a great monarch, than a 
place intended only for the meeting of merchants 
to transact the ordinary business of life. The 
western facade consists of perhaps the largest and 
most striking portico in existence, formed of six lofty 
composite pillars, surmounted by a pediment filled 
with an elaborately scattered group, emblematical 
of commercial pursuits and objects. The portico 
is approached by several steps, and in front of it 
there is an open paved area, on which is a fine 
equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington. 
I There are kept here anemometers and other scien- 
, tifio instruments, for ascertaining the state and 
[ the force of the atmosphere. In this building 



lOn 



m 



LON 



is the Buite of rooms appropriated to the Society of 
Lloyd's Underwriters, where the masters and 
owners of merchant vessels meet, and where so 
large a portion of the maritime business of the 
port of London is arranged. The north and 
south fiidos of the Exchange are also embellished 
with pilasters, the lower story being occupied as 
shops: the interior forms a quadrangle surrounded 
by a piUzza, the arches of which support a series of 
apartments, and in the middle there is an area for 
the assemblage of the merchants, in the centre of 
which there is a statue of her present Majesty Queen 
Victoria. The Stock Exchange is situated oppo- 
site the east door of the Bank. No one is allowed 
to transact business here except regular stock- 
brokers, who must be balloted for annually by a 
committee, and, on being chosen, subscribe ten 
guineas each. The Auction Mart in Bartholomew 
Lane is a simple and elegant building, erected in 
1808, from designs by Mr. John Walters, and con- 
tains a spacious saloon for sales of every description, 
and various apartments for auctions and auctioneers, 
&c. In Broad Street is situated the Excise Office, 
built in 1763, on the site of the almshouse and 
college founded by Sir Thomas Gresham ; the busi- 
ness is now consolidated with the other branches 
of inland revenue, under a general title. Lombard 
Street, now chiefly occupied by bankers, derived 
its name from having been the residence of the 
Lombards, the money-lenders of former times ; at 
No. 43, was the residence of Jane Shore, whose 
husband was a silversmith. In Canon Street is 
St. Swithin's Church, built by Sir C. Wren in 
1680. In the south wall of it is the London 
Stone, which was looked upon as an antiquity 
in the time of William I. It was formerly much 
larger than at present, and was probably the place 
from which the Romans measured the distance of 
their stations. In Bishopsgate Street is the 
Church of St. Helen's, which is remarkable as 
being one of those that escaped the * great fire.' 
It contains several curious monuments, among 
which may be mentioned those of Sir Thomas 
Gresham, the founder of the Royal Exchange; 
Sir Julius Csesar, Master of the Rolls to James I. ; 
Sir William Pickering; Sir John Crosby; and 
Francis Bancroft, who left a large sum to the 
Drapers' Company for the foundation of alms- 
houses, and whose remains are deposited in a 
chest, the lid of which is not fastened, and there is 
a square of glass over the face. 

At the bottom of Fish Street Hill stands the 
Monument, which was erected by Sir Christopher 
Wren, by order of the parliament, to commemorate 
the Great Fire of London in 1666, and the rebuild- 
ing of the city. It was commenced in 1671, and 
finished in 1677, and, for proportion, is the finest 
modem column in the world. Its height from the 
pavement is 202 feet ; the greatest diameter of the 
body of the column is 15 feet ; the pedestal is 28 
feet square, and 40 feet high. Over the capital 
there is an iron balcony, round a cippus or meta, 
32 feet high, supporting a blazing urn. There 
are Latin inscriptions on the north and south 
sides of the pedestal, relating the circumstances 
under which the Monument was erected; and 
on the front or west side, there is a finely 
carved and curious emblematical piece of sculp- 



\ ture, representing the fire, and containing the 
figures of Charles II. and his brother James. The 
inscription on the brtse of the Monument, fklsely 
attributing the origin of the fire to the Roman 
Catholics, was erased in 1840. The admission to 
the gallery of the Monument is sixpence. Several 
persons having committed suicide by throwing 
themselves from it, an overhead grating has been 
constructed to the gallery, so that a similar cata- 
strophe cannot again occur. 

In Leadenhall Street is the East India House, 
which contains the principal ofiices of the East 
India Company. It was founded in 1698, but 
as much altered and enlarged by Mr. jupp. 
It has a grand facade, about 200 feet in length, 
with a noble portico in the centre. The library 
has a fine collection of Indian and Chinese manu- 
scripts, and the museum is full of Indian cariosi- 
ties. 

In Mark Lane is situated the Com Exchange, 
which consists of a quadrangular paved court, sur- 
rounded by a colonnade, containing stands for the 
corn-factors: the entrance is formed by eight 
Doric columns. Adjoining this building stands 
the New Com Exchange, which was erected in 
1828, from designs by Mr. Smith, at a cost of 
£90,000. It is in the Greek-Doric style of archi- 
tecture, and has a facade, formed by a peristyle of 
six fluted columns, with rectangular wings and 
thin pilasters at the angles ; the frieze is highly 
ornamented : the sale-room is a spacious, well- 
lighted hall, with circular glasses placed in the 
floor to light the underground premises, the roof 
being supported by twelve cast-iron pillars; it 
contains eighty-two stands for the factors. The 
subscription-room, where the daily papers are read, 
is an elegant saloon, ornamented with four scagli- 
ola columns and pilasters. A destructive fire, 
which broke out here in September, 1850, de- 
stroyed a large portion of this edifice, which, how- 
ever, will probably soon be restored. 

In Lower Thames Street is the Custom-house, 
which was erected in 1813, from designs by Mr. 
Laiug; in 1825, however, the Long-room fell 
in, and the whole of the centre was taken down 
and rebuilt by Mr. Smirke. The principal front, 
towards the river, has three porticoes, the centre 
one projecting further than the others, and ele- 
vated on a sub-basement of five arehes; it is sur- 
mounted by a balustrade, with a clock in the 
middle. The building is 480 feet long, and 100 
broad; and has accommodation for about 650 
clerks and officers, and 1000 tidewaiters and other 
ofl!lcials. The first Custom-house in London was 
erected in 1559. 

Near the Custom-house is the New Coal Ex- 
change, a remarkably elegant and commodious 
structure, rising in a dome-like form, the interior 
he'mg richly embellished with numerous remarka- 
bly beautiful fresco paintings. The floor under the 
dome is ornamented with a very beautiful piece of 
inlaid woodwork, of a star-like form. The Ex- 
change was opened, in great state, in 1849, by his 
Royal Highness Prince Albert, attended by the 
great city functionaries, and the Prince of Wales, 
the Princess Koyal, and all the elevated oflScers of 
his own household, on which occasion the then lord 
mayor. Sir James Duke, was elevated to the dig- 




iSty of A bftroiiet The stnictare is admirably 
amnged, and baa been found a very useful, as 
well as a highly ornamental, addition to the publio 
offices of Lcmdon. 

In a line with the Cnstom-hoose, .in Lower 
Thames Sti^t, stands Billingsgate Market, the 
celebrated daily market iot fish : it is supplied by 
the fislung-smacka and boats that come up the 
riTer Thames from the sea, and also fresh fish, by 
Umd carriage, from all parts of England and Wales. 

Beyond the Custom-house and Billingsgate 
Market, Jit the south-eastern extremity of the city, 
staads the Tower of London ; it is built upon the 
north bank of the Thames, and from some ooius 
that hare been found here, it is supposed that the 
Sonana had a fort upon this spot. The present 
edifice was erected by William I., at the com- 
meaoeolent of his reign, and well garrisoned with 
Nonnans. It is goremed by a constable, who has 
charge of the regalia. A wide and deep ditch 
nms northwards on either side of the fortress, 
meeting in a semicirele, the slope being iaced 
with brick, with which material the walls hate 
frequently been repaired. The circumference on 
the outside of the ditch is 3,156 feet, and a space 
of 12 aeres 5 roods is enclosed by the walls. The 
Tower is separated from the Thames by a plat- 
form and part of the ditch. The western entrance, 
which is the principal one, consists of two gates 
outside the ditch, a stone bridge oyer it, and a gate 
wi^in: great ceremony is used in opening the 
gates. Ob th« south of the Tower is the Traitor's 
Gate, an arch through which prisoners were con- 
veyed to the fortress by water; near it is the 
Bloody Tower, ao called in the reign of Elizabeth, 
but from what cause is unknown. The royal 
^artments wrere on the south-east; for the Tower 
was sometiukcs the place of residence of the Sove- 
leign, till the accession of Elizabeth. The church 
called St. Peter, in Yincula, was erected in the 
reign of Edward I., and in it are laid the 
bodies of sereral illustrious persons who suf- 
fered here, or on Tower Hill. The White Tower, 
or Gtadel, waa erected by Qundulpfa, Bishop 
of Bochester, in 1070, and is 116 feet long, 96 
broad, and 92 feet high; the walls are 11 feet 
tidek, and hare a winding staircase; there are 
three lofty stories, with vaults beneath, and a re- 
aerrob for supplying the garrison witJi water at 
the top. This tower also oontams the Chapel of 
8t John, formerly used by the English monarchs ; 
it is now part of the Kecord Office. Sir Walter 
Baldgk is said to have been imprisoned in a yault 
beneath it, and to hare written his '* History of the 
World '' there. The Office of Keeper of the Beoords 
ooatains all the roDs firom the time of King John 
to the beginning of the reign of Bichard III.; and 
onder it is a powder magazine 1 1 ! The Wakefield 
Tower contains a handsome octagonal room, in 
which Heniy YI. is said to haye been murdered ; 
the Lollards were also confined here. The Jewel 
Office is a dark strong stone room, in which the 
ngalia are kept; here is also a'ooUection of ancient 
plate. The Horse Armoury, a room 1<60 feet long 
and BS wide, was built in 1825, and contains the 
BiBts of annour of warious distinguished and cele- 
bnted personages, arranged in chronological order 

tnm the year 1272 to 1^5, and also specimens of 
Tocm. 



ordnance up to the time of Heury VI. In 1841 
a fire took place at the Tower, which destroyed the 
Grand Storefiouse and Small Armoury, containing 
above 20,000 stand of arms, besides committing 
other extensive ravages. Queen Elizabeth'^, or 
the Spanish Armoury, was said to have been so 
called from its containing the spoils of the Spanish 
Armada. The Beauchamp or Cobham Tower is cele- 
brated for the illustrious persons who have been 
imprisoned in it. The Bowyer Tower was where 
the Duke of Garence was drowned in a butt of 
malmsey. The Lion's Tower, built by Edward 
lY., derived its name from the menagerie having 
formerly been kept there. 

Near the Tower is an elegant edifice of Portland 
stone, used as the Trinity House. The Society of the 
Trinity was founded in 1515, by Sir Thos. Spelman, 
and is a corporation consisting of a master, four war- 
dens, eight assistants, and eighteen elder brethren, 
mostly commanders in the navy or merchant ser- 
vice: their duty is to examine the children in 
Christ's Hospital, and the masters of King's ships, 
to appoint pilots for the Thames, to settle the rates 
of pilotage, erect lighthouses and sea-marks, to 
grant licenses to poor seamen not free of the city 
to row on the Thames, to hear and determine com- 
plaints of officers and men in the merchant service, 
and all business connected with the Thames. They 
derive their revenues from tonnage, light-dues, &c. 
Upon Tower Hill, also, stands the Mint, a hand- • 
some stone edifice. 

At the eastern extromity of Wapping is the en- 
trance to that stupendous monument of human 
ingenuity, the Thames Tunnel, which forms a 
communication, beneath the Thames, between 
Wapping and Botherhithe. It was constructed 
under the direction of Mr. Brunei, the first stone of 
the descent for pedestrians, on the south side of 
the river, having been laid in March, 1825, by 
Mr. Smith, the chairman of the company. It 
is entered by a well-proportioned stone stair- 
case; but there are also entrances for carriages, 
formed by circular descents of easy declivity, so 
that it is not necessary to lock the wheel of the 
heaviest laden waggon. The interior consists of 
two brick archways, which are paved or macadam- 
ized, and there are distinct footpaths for passen- 
gers ; in the centre, and between the two arches, 
there is a line of spacious arches, each containing 
a gas-light. It is 1,300 feet in length, 35 feet 
in width, and 20 feet high. 

Basinghall Street contains the Court of Bank- 
ruptcy, a plain quadrangular edifice of brick and 
stone, erected in 1820, from designs by Mr. Fowler: 
it contains fourteen public rooms, connected by 
commodious and spacious galleries. 

St. John's Qate, leading to St. John's Square, 
Clerkenwell, is a splendid and well-preserved speci- 
men of monastic building ; it was anciently the gate 
to the priory of St. John of Jerusalem, which 
stood here, and in more modem times is cele- 
brated as the place of publication of the earlier 
numbers of the Gentleman^a Magazine, It was 
the frequent resort of Grarrick, Dr. Johnson, and 
other distinguished persons ; it is now used partly 
as a tavern, and partly as a watch-house. At 
Clerkenwell Close formerly stood the house of Oliver 
CromwelL On Clerkenwell Green stands the Ses- 




sions-house for the county of Middlesex, which was 
erected about 1780 : it has a stone fa9ade, with a rus- 
tic basement, aboye which there are four Ionic pil- 
lars and two pilasters, supporting other ornaments. 
Above the centre window is placed a medallion of 
George III., and over two others those of Justice 
and Mercy, by NolLekens. The interior is divided 
into the court, the hall, and rooms for the magis- 
trates, grand jury, &c. One of the rooms contains 
a portrait of Sir B. Hicks, the founder of the old 
hall, which stood in St. John's Street. Near Spa 
Fields is Clerkenwell Prison, a common Jail for 
the county of Middlesex. There is a pump at No. 3 
Bay Street, on which is an inscription, to the effect 
that it is furnished with water from a well about 
four feet to the east, round which the parish 
clerks of London assembled in ancient times to 
perform mysteries, or sacred plays ; from this cir- 
cumstance the parish of Clerkenwell derives its 
name. In Fore Street, Cripplegate, stands the 
church of St. Giles, greeted about 1546. Above 
the south-east door there is a fine figure of Time. 
Oliver Cromwell was married in this church ; and 
nere are buried Fox the martyrologist, Speed the 
historian, and the great poet Milton, whose re- 
mains lie beneath the clerk's desk, near those of 
his father; the monument to his memory is by 
Bacon, and was erected at the expense of S. Whit- 
bread, Esq. 

DISTRICT TO THE WESTWARD OF ST. PAUL'S. 

Having now taken a survey of the principal 
buildings and streets of the metropolis to the 
north and east of St. Paul's, we will commence a 
description of those towards the south and west of 
London. The neighbourhood of the cathedral still 
retains appellations denoting its former connection 
with the church, such as Creed Lane, Ave Maria 
Lane, Amen Comer, &c. Between Amen Corner 
and Ludgate Street, stands Stationers' Hall, which 
was erected on the site of a mansion anciently be- 
longing to John, Duke of Bretagne and Earl of 
Richmond, and afterwards to the Earls of Pembroke 
and Abergavenny. It was finally possessed by 
the Company of Stationers, who rebuilt it of wood, 
but it was destroyed in the Great Fire, and replaced 
by the present edifice, which contains good por- 
traits of Steele, Richardson, Prior, and Bishop 
Hoadley, &c. From Stationers' Hall formerly 
issued all the almanacks that were published. 

In St. Paul's Churchyard stands St. Paul's 
School, a handsome edifice, erected in 1822, from 
designs by Mr. G. Smith. This institution was 
founded in 1509 by Dr. Colet, dean of St. Paul's 
cathedral, and was established for the free educa- 
tion of 153 boys, by a master, an usher, and a 
chaplain, but now by two upper and two under 
masters. The Mercers' Company are the trustees 
of the foundation. The revenue of the school 
altogether amounts to about £6,000. There are 
eight classes or forms, and those boys who have 
passed these are moved to the universities, where 
there are several exhibitions belonging to this 
school. On the south of St. Paul's is Doctors' 
Commons, where courts are held for the trial of 
civil and ecclesiastical causes, under the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London. 
There are also offices in which wills are deposited 



and searched. All those who practise in this court 
are advocates or proctors ; the former are such as 
have taken the degree of doctor of civil law, and 
act as counsellors or pleaders. The Court of Arches 
and the Prerogative Court are held here, and also 
the Admiralty Court, the judge of which is pre- 
ceded by an officer with a silver oar. The Prero- 
gative-office is open from 9 to 3, and Is. is the 
charge for searching for a will : the original wills 
of Milton and Shakspeare are deposited here. 

heralds' college. 

To the east of Doctors' Commons is the Heralds' 
College ; the members of this college are three 
kings-at-arms, six heralds-at-arms, and four por- 
suivants-at-arms, who attend the king on state 
occasions, make proclamations, &c. : the building 
contains a court of honour, a library, and apart- 
ments for the members. 

WEST OP ST. PAUL'S. 

To the west of St. Paul's is Ludgate Hill: the 
origin of the name is not known. A gate, which 
was rebuilt in 1586, formerly crossed the street by 
St. Martin's church, and was a place of refuge ; or, 
according to some, a place of confinement for 
debtors : it was removed in 1760. No. 24 ia the 
London Coffee House, in which there is a stone 
with a Latin inscription to the memory of Claudia, 
the wife of a Roman general, which was discovered 
in 1806. The Bell Savage is an inn of great 
antiquity ; its name, according to Stow, was de- 
rived from one Isabella Savage, who gave this inn 
to the Cutlers' Company, but Addison says that 
it was taken from La Belle Sauvage, a heavHfid 
icoman who lived in a tpUderness, described in an 
old French romance. Between Ludgate Hill and 
the Thames, anciently stood a monastery of the 
Black Friars, an order of Dominicans, in which 
parliaments were sometimes held, and which was 
frequently honoured by a visit fipom royalty; in^ 
a hall here, the cause was tried between Henry 
VIII. and Queen Katherine. Near this, perhaps 
on the site of the present Playhouse-yard, stood 
the Theatre in Blackfrian, where Shakspeare's, 
Ben Jonson's, and Beaumont and Fletcher's plays 
were performed. Printing-house Square, in the 
vicinity, is the site of the ancient king's printing- 
house, whence bibles, prayer-books, and prodama- 
tions were issued. In this square are &e exten* 
sive premises occupied by the "Times" newspaper 
office. On the opposite side of the street is the 
ancient palace of Bridewell, now a house of cor- 
rection : it was restored by Henry YIIL, and 
granted by Edward YI. to be used as a house 
of correction, as was recorded in the £allowing 
lines that hung under a portrait of that lung in the 
chapel : — 

" This Edward of fair memory tho sixth, 
In whom with greatness, goodness was commiztt 
Gave this Bridewell, a Palaoe in old timou 
For a chastising house of vagrant crime." 

A building connected with this establishment 
formerly stood near Bethlehem hospital, but it 
has recently been removed to Norwood, in which 
nearly 200 boys and girls are instructed in me- 
chanical employments. In Castle Street, which 
is nearer the river, anciently stood, on the banks 



i of the Thames, a large bailding called Baynard's 
Castle, from the name of its first owner ; it ' 
afterwards belonged to the Fitzwalters, one of 
whom. Baron Robert Fitzwalter, in the reign of 
John, headed the army of his brother barons, when 
they made those demands which led to the signing 
of Magna Charta. The castle was burnt down in 
1428, bat was restored by Humphrey, Duke of 
Gloooester; and it was hero that Richard III. 
sMamed the royal dignity, on the invitation of 
Bockiogham. The building was entirely destroyed 
IB the great firo of 1666, but the ward in which it 
stood still retains its name. Near London Bridge, 
on the banks of the Thames, also stands Fishmong- 
en' Hall, a fine and handsome edifice, erected in 
1833, from designs by Mr. Roberts, near the site 
of the old ball built by Sir G. Wren. The building 
contains a carious statue of Six William Walworth, 
grasping the identical dagger with which Wat 
Tyler was stabbed. 

LUDOATB HILL, && 

About the centre of Ludgate Hill In the Old 
Bailey, leading to Newgate Btreet; it contains 
the sessions-honfle, in which a court is held for the 
trial of criminalii eight times in the year, by the 
Qoeen's commission of oyer and terminer; and 
oomprehends in its jurisdiction the county of Mid- 
dlesex and the city of London : the judges are the 
lord mayor, those aldermen that haye passed the 
chair, the recorder, the common sergeant, toge- 
ther with the judges of England, and both the 
iheriffs. The Central Criminal Court sessions are 
held once in six weeks, and the court has juris- 
diction of the whole metropolis, and fifteen or 
twenty miles round. Adjoining this court is the 
prison of Newgate, which derires its name from 
the gate which once formed a portion of it. Per- 
sons of rank were imprisoned here as early as 
1218, but it was afterwards rebuilt by the execn- 
ton of fiir Richard Whittington : it was destroyed 
by the grea.t &ce. Ai%er that time it was twice 
rebuilt before 1780, in which year, during the 
rioti, the wbole of the interior was destroyed by fire ; 
afiter which, the building was reconstructed in its 
present form. The prison is divided into three sta^ 
timis: the first for oouTicts, the second for pri- 
soners confined for crimes and misdemeanors, and 
the third for females. There is also a neat chapel, 
sod a school for boys. The chaplain has a salary 
of £265 per annum. 

Breakneck Stairs, in Green Arbour Court, which 
leads from the opposite side of the street, is one of 
the places where watermen plied for ikre on the 
Fleet ditch; and it was in a house orer these 
stairs, that Oliver Goldsmith wrote his " Vicar of 
Wakefield.'* Newgate Btreet contains several old 
houses, some of which have sculptures upon them, 
similar, no doubt, to those signs by which every 
shop in London was formerly known. At tbo cor- 
ner of Warwick Lane is a stone figure of Guy, 
Eari of Warwick, whose house stood near this spot. 

In Newgate Street stands Christ's Hospital, 
better known as the Blue-Coat School, in which 
there are generally from 1,000 to 1,200 boys and 
girls receiving their education, their boarding, and 
their clothing. It was founded by the good and 
pious Edward VL, on the suggestion of Dr. Ridley, 



bishop of London. The establishment at first con- 
sisted of a grammar-school for boys, and a separate 
school for girls. Charles II. founded and endowed 
a mathematical school, or ward, for forty boys, 
and another mathematical school was abo founded 
by Mr. Travers. The lord mayor and corporation 
of London are directors of the institution. A do- 
nation of £400 constitutes a goveri or : the annual 
expenditure is about £30,000. The present build- 
ing was erected from designs by Mr. Shaw. The 
Infirmary was completed in 1822, and in 1829 the 
New Hall was opened. It is a fine structure in 
the Tudor style, 187 feet long, 51^ wide, and 46j 
high; the south facade is of stone, and has a 
statue of Edward YI. In the centre it is fbinked 
by towers, between which are eight lofty windows. 
The interior contains several portraits of Charles 
II., Queen Anne, &c., also Holbein's picture of 
Edward VI. granting the charter to the hospital : 
the court-room has several fine portraits. On the 
front of the writing-school there is a statue of Sir 
John Moore, its founder. In the great hall it is 
customary for the lord mayor, aldermen, &c., to 
attend on St. Matthew's day to hear orations from 
the senior boys, many of whom have afterwards 
become eminent in their several positions in life. 
Among the celebrated persons buried in the clois- 
ters of Christ's Hospital, may be mentioned John 
of Bourbon, who was made prisoner at the battle 
of Agincourt ; Thomas Burdett ; and Isabella, the 
wife of Edward II. 

Christ Churoh, near the hospital, is a handsome 
building with a lofty square tower, erected in 
1687 on the site of a church of Franciscans, where 
between 600 and 700 celebrated persons were in- 
terred ; the front is of white marble, ornamented 
with basso relievos ; the pulpit is finely carved. 
The nonconformist divine, Richard Baxter, is 
buried here. St. Sepulchre Churoh, in Skinner 
Street, is a fin^ stone building, erected by Sir C. 
Wren in 1670. 

West Smithfield is the place where, during 
the Marian persecution, the martyrs suffered at 
the stake ; the spot where the fires were gene • 
rally kindled was a little esistward of the west- 
em gate of St. Bartholomew's hospital, and about 
fifty paces from the walls of that building. In 
more ancient times, Smithfield was frequently the 
scene of jousts and tournaments, when the knights 
and ladies rode here in procession from the Tower. 
It was here that the Lord Mayor Walworth killed 
Wat Tyler. It is now remarkable as the largest 
cattle market in England, though great efforts are 
at present being made to remove the market to 
Islington, in consequence of the inconvenience oc- 
casioned by driving large flocks of sheep and 
herds of cattle through the city. 

On the south of the market stands St. Bar- 
tholomew's Hospital, which formerly belonged 
to the priory of St. Bartholomew in Smithfield, 
founded by Rahere, who was the first prior, in 
1102. It was incorporated in the last year of tho 
reig^ of Henry VIII., and has now a revenue of 
about £30,000 per annum. The hospital was re- 
built in 1729, and contains wards for the reception 
of patients, nearly 11,000 of whom are annually 
relieved here. The principal entrance, built in 
1702, consists of a large arch, above which there 



is a Btatae of Henry YIII. ^ho gpmnd staircase 
was painted by Hogarth at his own expense. 
Within the precincts of the hospital is the Church 
of St. Bartholomew the Less, erected about 1420 ; 
it is a small bat interesting structure 

Along Farringdon Street, and at the bottom of 
Ludgate Hill, formerly ran the Fleet ditch, which 
became such 4 nuisance that it was gradually 
closed in and built over. The Fleet prison, which 
was palled down a short time ago, was founded 
in the beginning of the reign of Richard I., and 
was the place of confinement for those imprisoned 
by the Star Chamber. In the market before this 
prison, men plied in behalf of clergymen, inviting 
people to widk in and be married. To such an 
extent^ says Malcolm, were the prooeediriffs ecarriedy 
tliat twenty and Hiirty cotiple were joined in one 
day, at from ten to twenty shillings each; and, be- 
tween the IQtJi October, 1704, and the 12th February, 
1705, 2,954 marriages were cekbraied {by evidence), 
besides others known to have been omitted. The 
abuse at length became so great, that it was put 
an end to by Lord Hardwicke's marriage act. 
The Fleet ditch is thus spoken of by Pope in his 
* Dunciad :' — 

" This labonr past, by Bridewell all deseead, 
(As morning prayer Aud flagellation end,) 
To where Fleet ditch, with disemlx>g^iing streams, 
Rolls the large tribute of dead dogs to Thames : 
The king of dyltes 1 than whom no alnioe of mud 
With deeper sable blots the silver flood." 

The obelisk at the east of Fleet Street denotes the 
extent of the Fleet ditch in 1775, when it was 
filled up, and the present Bridge Street was erected 
on its site. Opposite is the Waithman Testimonial, 
a granite obelisk, erected by subscription in 1833. 

Fleet Street was for a long time the great place 
for shows and spectacles, and the famous ceremony 
of burning the pope took place here; on the left 
side of which is seen the handsome spire of St. 
Bride's Church. This edifice is allowed to be one 
of the finest productions of Sir C. Wren: the 
spire was originally 234 feet high, but having 
been damaged by lightning, it was much reduced : 
the interior of the building is one of the most 
beautiful in London. Bouverie Street leads to a 
spot once celebrated as Whitefriars, or Alsatia, 
which was originally a religious sanctuary, be- 
longing to the Carmelite convent of Whitefriars, 
and which, from the reign of Elizabeth to that of 
William III., who suppressed it, was a sanctuary 
or place of refuge for debtors, and the habitation 
of the most abandoned and profiigate persons in 
London. Sir Walter Scott, in his * Fortunes of 
Nigel,' gives an admirable and life-like description 
of this place in the reign of James I. 

Next to Whitefriars is the Temple, so called from 
having anciently been the dwelling-house of the 
knights- templars, whoso order was dissolved in 
the reign of Edward II., when the house was pur- 
chased by the professors of common law, and con- 
verted into inns. It is divided into the Inner and 
Middle Temple, referring to Essex House, which 
stood on the other side of Temple Bar, and was 
called the Outer Temple, till it came into the pos- 
session of the Essex family. The principal en- 
trance to the Temple is the Middle Temple gate, 
erected by Inigo Jones : it consists of a structure 
of brick, with four Ionic stone pilasters upon a 



rustic basement, carved with the figure of a lamb, 
the device of the society. The only part of the 
ancient buildings which now remains is St. Mary's, 
or the Temple Church, a Gothic stone building, 
erected in 1185, which contains the monuments 
of some knights crosslegged, showing that they 
had been crusaders in the Holy Land : those to 
the right are supposed to represent the Marshals, 
first, second, and third Earls of Pembroke, and 
another of them is that of Qeoflrey de Magnaville, 
Earl of Essex, killed in Cambridgeshire in 1148. 
This church also contains the remains of the emi- 
nent lawyers, Plowden, Selden, and Thurlow. 
The entrance is formed by a beantiftil Norman 
arch. The church was recased with stone, under 
the direction of Mr. Smirke, in 1828, and within 
these few years the interior has been renovated 
and most richly embellished, at an enormous ex- 
pense, so that this is now one of the most beautl* 
ful ecclesiastical structures in this or any other 
country, and quite worthy of the great society for 
which it is the place of worship. 

The institutions called the Inns of Court, were 
formerly places in which persons were brought up 
and educated for the bar, but the law students 
have now only to eat a certain number of dinners, 
during the terms of three or five years, in one of 
the inns of court, the expense amounting to about 
£150. The inns are governed by masters, princi- 
pals, benchers, stewards, &c., and the members 
consist of benchers, outer barristers, inner barris- 
ters, and students ; a treasurer is annually chosen 
from the benchers. 

Sergeants' Inn, leading out of Chancery Lane, baa 
been occupied by the sergeants-at-law since the 
days of Henry IV. : the present houses were erected 
in 1730. The office of the Amicable Annuitant 
Society stands on the site of the ancient ball and 
chapel. One of the customs formerly observed in 
the creation of sergeant, was for the learned gen- 
tleman to go in procession to St. Paul's, aad there 
choose his pillar, as in ancient times the lawyers 
took their station at one of the pillars of the cathe- 
dral, and there waited for clients. Clifibrd's Inn, 
adjoining Sergeant's Inn, is so called from the 
noble family of De Qifibrd, who granted it to the 
stndents-at-law in the time of Edward III. The 
KoUs Court, in Chancery Lane, is ornamented with 
a statue of George I. The master of the rolls is 
keeper of the roUs or records of the acts of the 
courts of law ; as a judge, he decides on cases of 
equity, and hears motions, &c. He has a hand- 
some residence attached to the court, but the pre- 
sent nutster of the rolls. Lord Langdale, does not 
live in it. Adjoining it is the Rolls Chapel^ in 
which a large number of the records or rolls of 
parchment are kept. It was originally the bouse 
of an eminent Jew, from whom it was taken by 
Henry III., and converted into a residence for 
converts firom the Jewish religion ; it was after- 
wards g^ven by Edward III. to the Court of Chan- 
cery, to keep its records in. 

In Fleet Street, near Chancery Lane, was the 
house of Isaac Walton, and on the other side of 
the comer of the lane resided Abraham Cowley. 
Shire Lane, adjoining Temple Bar, is celebrated as 
the place from which Isaac Biokerstaff, the name 
under which Richard Steele wrote the 'Tatler,' 



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dated his paper?: tlie celebrated Kit-Katdub is 
said to have originated in this lane. Near Temple 
Bar, about the site of Child's banking-house, stood 
the oelebiated DeyiVs Tavern, where Ben Jon- 
Bon held his clnb : this is the one mentioned bj 
Pope: — 

* And each true Briton Is to Ben so civil. 
Ha mreurs the Musee met him at the ueriV* 

The Fire of London stopped at the Temple Ex- 
change Coffee-house, a circnmstance that is recorded 
(ma stone in the front of it At the western extremity 
of Fleet Street is Temple Bar, the only one of tlie 
city boundaries at present in existence; it was 
erwsted by Sir C, Wren, after the Great Fire, and 
ia formed of Portland stone; it is of the Corinthian 
order, and has two posterns for foot passengers : 
there are stone statues of Elizabeth and James I. 
above the gateway, on the east side, and statues 
of Charles I. and II. over the west side. The 
heads of persons executed for high treason were 
formeriy exhibited over this gate; and here, on 
state occasions, the lord mayor and the corpora- 
tion receive the royal family, &c. 

On the west side of Temple Bar is the Strand, 
so named fi-om its situation on the banks of the 
t Thames. On the left is Essex Street, once cele- 
brated as tbe residence of Elizabeth's favourite, 
the Earl of Essex, who inherited it from the other 
fiivoarite, tlie Earl of Leicester: it was pulled 
down soon after the Restoration, and the present 
street and court were erected on its site. The 
church of 8t. Clement Danes stands in the open 
area in the middle of the Strand, and is said to 
have ,been erected on the site of one built here in 
700. The present edifice, which is of stone, was 
built by Sir C. Wren in 1680, and a lofty steeple was 
erected by Gibbs in 1718. Otway was buried here 
in 1685, and Dr. Ejtchiner in 1827. Clement's 
Inn, on the right, is so named (rom the church, 
and is entered through a gateway; the hall is a 
small Tuscan building, ornamented with several 
portraits, and the square is decorated with a hand- 
some statue of a negro, holding a sun-dial. The 
following lines have been written in reference to 
this figure : — 

** In Tain, poor table eon of woe ! 

Thon seek^st the tender tear; 
For thee In vain with pangs they flew. 

For mercv dwells not here. 
From cannioalB thou fled'st In vain ; 

LawTera leas quarter glre ; 
The first won't eat 70a till you're abhi, 

The last wiU do't alive." 

This hm is of great antiquity, and Shakspeare 
makes his JusHee JShaUow a member of it. He 
muii io Ihe Imu of OourL I ioa$ of Clemeni?s once 
■tyielf, where Aey lofib of Mad ShaUom stOL A 
pump now covers St. Clement's well, whote waters^ 
says Fitsstephen, writing in the reign of Henry 
U., ore tweeit ealuhrioutj and dear, and whose run- 
ndt vturmur oW the shimng eUmee. HchpioeU, 
Gkrheawdif ami SL O^emenfe Well, he continues, 
ore the faottfrequonied, both by the eeholars from the 
iduol fWeetmiiuterJf and the yoM from the city, 
toAoi on a summer*s evening they are disposed to take 
on airisff, Matlen in this respect are now a little 
ehanged. 



The Church of St. Mary-le-Strand was erected by 
Gibbs in 1717, being ^e of the fifty ordered in the 
reign of Anne ; the exterior is highly ornamented, 
and it has a lofty steeple. To the left is Somerset 
House, a noble edifice, erected in 1775, from designs 
by Sir William Chambers. It is built upon the site 
of a magnificent mansion, erected by Somerset the 
Protector, on whose execution it fell to the crown, 
and became the residence of the queens of James 
I., Charles I., and Charles II. Cromwell's body 
lay in state here, as afterwards did that of Monk. 
The present edifice is in the form of a quadrangle, 
occupying a space about 800 feet in width, aod 
500 in depth, having a large court in the centre. 
The front towards the river is very imposing, and 
consists of a spacious terrace, raised on rustic 
arches, adorned with a colossal mask of the Thames 
in alto relievo. This building contains several 
public ofBces, besides apartn;ent8 for the meetings 
of the Royal Society, the Society of Antiquaries, 
the Geological Society, and the Royal Astronomi- 
cal Society: the University of (iOndon, incorpo- 
rated by William IV., and the School of Design, 
instituted by government in 1837 for the education 
of industrial artists, and those who prepare patterns 
for manufacture, are also in this building. The 
east wing, completed in 1833, is appropriated to 
the purposes of the King's College, an admirable 
institution, designed to provide a good education, 
at a small cost, to youths in the metropolis and its 
vicinity. It is patronised by the dignitaries of the 
church and several of the nobility, and is under 
the control of a council of forty-one, of which the 
Bishop of London is president. Beyond Somerset 
House is Wellington Street, forming a handsome 
approach to Waterloo Bridge. Savoy Street leads 
to the site of the ancient Savoy palace, built in 1245 
by Peter, Earl of Savoy, and the place of the con- 
finement and death of John, King of France, in 
1364 ; it was afterwards used as an hospital, and then 
as a prison for deserters, but wds pulled down in 
1816. The ancient Savoy church is still in exist- 
ence ; it is a Gothic structure, dedicated to John the 
Baptist ; it has a remarkably fine Cf.rved roof, and 
was beautified and repaired in 1820; there are 
several ancient monuments in it, some of which 
are very magnificent : this was the burial-place of 
Anne Killigrew, rendered famous by the ode of 
Dryden, describing her as 

" X grace for beauty, and a mnse for wit." 

Exeter Hall, on the right of the Strand, was 
erected from designs by Mr. Gearing in 1830, for 
the meeting of religious, charitable, and scientific 
institutions. The principal room on the upper 
floor is 136 feet by 76, and will accommodate 
2,500 persons. Musical festivals, oratorios, and 
concerts are frequently held here. 

Hungerford Market derives its name firom an 
ancient Wiltshire family, who had a mansion here 
in the days of Charles II. It is a handsome and 
commodious structure, erected in 1831, from de- 
signs by Mr. Fowler, and consists of three divi- 
sions : one of them in the form of a quadrangle, is 
140 feet by 70, flanked by colonnades, and with 
\ houses and shops on either side ; the centre hall is 
188 feet by 23, and consists of four rows of granite 
columns, with arches, which support the roof, and 



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on each side of the hall is a line of shops. The lower 
quadrangle was huilt for th» fish market, hut a fire 
having recently taken place here, greater accom- 
modation was provided hy the erection of shops 
and houses towards the river, and the fish market 
is now removed from the lower to the upper part 
of the market. This market forms a fine approach 
to the Hungerford Suspension Bridge. 

Craven Street, to the right of Hungerford Mar- 
ket, was once the residence of Benjamin Franklin. 
On the north side of the Strand, opposite a part of 
the Adelphi, is the Lowther Arcade. Northum- 
hcrland House, at the western extremity of the 
Strand, and opposite Trafalgar Square, is the only 
one now remaining of all tibe stately mansions of 
the nohility hy which it was once surrounded. It 
was erected upon the site of the ancient hospital of 
St. Mary Roncesvaux, hy Henry Howard, Earl of 
Northampton, in the reign of James I. The Earl 
of Suffolk inherited it, and called it Suffolk House ; 
and in 1642, Algernon, Earl of Northumherland, 
having married the daughter of Lord Suffolk, he- 
came its owner, Imd gave it its present appellation. 
The front is surmounted by a lion, the device of 
the Percy family : the edifice has two wings more 
than 100 feet long, stretching from the garden 
' front to the river; the principal door leads to a 
vestibule about 82 feet in length, and 12 in width, 
ornamented with Doric columns, and terminated 
at each end by a splendid marble staircase leading 
to the principal apartments, which are most splen- 
didly fitted up, and contain numerous paintings by 
the best masters. There is a garden between the 
house and the river. It was at Northumberland 
House that Goldsmith, after studying some fine 
compliments for the Duke of Northumberland, de- 
livered them to an elegantly dressed gentleman, 
whom he discovered to be the footman. 

taapaloah square, paix mall, Ao. 

Trafalgar Square is a noble area, 132 yards by 
77, constructed in the reign of George IV., from 
the grounds of the Old King's Mews. On the 
northern side stands the National Gallery, noxt to 
which is St. Martin's Church ; on the west is a 
range of handsome houses, and on the east the 
College of Physicians, and the Union Club. In 
the centre there are two fountains supplied with 
water from an Artesian well, which also supplies 
several public buildings in the neighbourhood, be- 
sides some baths and wash-houses that have lately 
been established there. The Nelson Column, to 
the west of the fountains, is a fine monument, the 
capital in imitation of that of the Mars Ultor at 
Rome. It is 162 feet in height, and surmounted 
by a statue of Nelson. The total elevation of 
this column is 193 feet; the statue is 17 feet high, 
and the pedestal on which it stands, 14 feet. On 
the four sides of the pedestal are beautifully-carved 
basso-relievi of Nelson's principal engagements. 
The entire cost was about £30,000. The southern 
portion of Trafalgar Square is formed by Charing 
Cross, so called from one of the crosses which Ed- 
ward 1. erected here to the memory of his queen, 
Eleanor, and from the village of Charing, as this 
spot was then called. Some however say that it 
was so called from a corruption of the French 
words CJth^e reyne<, dear queen. The cross was 



destroyed during the parliamentaiy war, and was 
replaced by a statue of Charles' I., cast by Le 
Seur, in 1633, which was the first equestrian 
statue erected in Great Britain. The parliament 
sold it to John River, a brazier in Holbom, with 
orders to destroy it, but he concealed it till the 
Restoration, when it was replaced in its former 
position on a pedestal executed by Grinlin Gib- 
bons. Hugh Peters was executed here in 1660. 

The National Gallery, at the north of the square, 
has a facade of 460 feet in length, the depth of it 
being 56 feet It contains a magnificent collection 
of pictures, which was commenced in 1824 by the 
purchase, on the part of the government, of most of 
the pictures belonging to the late Mr. Angerstein. 
It now comprises specimens of the works of the 
most celebrated painters, ancient and modem, that 
Europe has produced, and it is open to the public 
on the first four days of the week. The Royal 
Academy also occupy apartments in the same 
building, and there is here an annual exhibition of 
paintings which have never been before exhi- 
bited. The works of modem artists, and no copies 
of other paintings are admitted. The Incorporated 
Society of Artists and Royal Academy obtained 
their charter in 1765, but in consequence of dis- 
putes arising between the directors, the Royal 
Academy was instituted; Sir Joshua Rejnnolds, 
who was the first president, being knighted on the 
occasion, which took place in 1768. This society 
is intended for the encouragement of design, paint- 
ing, sculpture, and other branches of the fine arts, 
and is under the direction of forty artists of the 
first rank. Sir Joshua Reynolds, Mr. West, Sir 
Thomas Lawrence, and Sir M. A. Shee, who is 
lately dead, were successively the presidents ; the 
present president is Charles Eastlake, Esq. 

The Church of St. Martin's in the Fields is a 
fine stone building, rebuilt by Gibbs in 1721, on 
the site of a church which had stood here in 1222. 
A noble portico of eight Corinthian columns, ap- 
proached by a flight of steps, forms the west front. 
The church is 140 feet long by 60 broad, and 45 
feet high ; it has a fine arched roof, and a handsome 
steeple. 

Pall Mall East, a triangular area adjoining 
Charing Cross, containing a handsome bronze 
equestrian statue of Gborge III., by Mr. M. C. 
Wyatt. 

The Haymarket, so called from the purpose to 
[ which it was formerly appropriated, contains the 
Queen's Theatre, or Italian Opera House, the 
most fashionable place of amusement in the me- 
tropolis : it was at first constructed by Sir John 
Yanbrugh, but was burnt down in 1790, and was 
soon afterwards rebuilt. The stage is 60 feet long, 
and 80 broad. Each box is enclosed wUh curtains, 
and there are five tiers, most of which are private 
property. The boxes will accommodate about 900 
' persons ; the pit will contain 800, and the gallery 
800. There is a grand concert-room attached to 
it, 95 feet long, 46 broad, and 35 high. 

Opposite to this is tJie Haymarket Theatre, 
erected from designs by Mr. Nash, in 1821, <m the 
site of the original building, which was erected in 
1702. 

Waterloo Place, leading to Regent Street, con- 
tains several handsome buildings, the oluef of 



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whicb ifl Uie Afchenmun Qub House ; and at the 
end, leading into 8t Jameses Park, to which there 
ia a fine flight of stepB, is the Duke of York's 
Column, which is constructed of pale red granite : 
it IB 150 feet high, and surmounted by a colossal 
statue of the Duke in bronsse, 14 feet high, exe- 
cuted by Westmaoott. The gallery, which is 
ascended by a spiral staircase, oonunands a fine 
rieir of London. 

Pall Mall contains seTeral noble specimens of 
ircbitectnre occupied as club-houses, the principal 
of which are the Reform Club, the United Service 
dub, the Carlton Club, Trayellers, &o., all of which 
an fitted up in the interior with the most luxurious 
magnificence. Marlborough House, In Pall Mall, 
was the residence of the late Queen Dowager, but is 
DOW deroted to the reception of the pictures com- 
posing the Vernon Gallery, until the Prince of Wales 
shall come of age, when it will become his resi- 
dence. It isa handsome brick edifice, and was erected 
in the reign of Queen Anne for the Duke of Marl- 
boruogh. At the western extremity of Pall Mall 
stands St. James's Palace, which is an irregular 
brick building, entered from St James's Street by 
a gatehouse leading to a court and piazza, beyond 
which is the grand staircase. It was erected by 
Heniy YllL on the site of an hospital of the same 
name, and, since AYhitehall was burnt down, has 
been a town residence of the British sovereigns. 
It is now only used for drawing-rooms, levees, and 
on other state occasions. The south-east wing 
was consumed in 1809, and has never been rebuilt. 
The state apartments look towards the park ; they 
are approached by a passage and staircase of ex- 
treme simplicity, at the end of which is a gallery, 
or guard-room, used as a kind of armoury. Be- 
yond this is a small chamber covered with tapes- 
tiy; the next room is fitted up with the greatest 
splendour, the walls being covered with crimson 
damask, tiie curtains being of the same material. 
This room contains an immense looking-glass, a 
punting of George If. in his robes, and other pic- 
tores, together with a splendid or-molu lustre. 
The next room is also splendidly fitted up, con- 
taining pictures, mirrors, &c. The third and last 
room is that in which the Queen holds her draw- 
ing-rooms, and the decorations in it are most mag- 
nificent and gorgeous. The throne consists of 
rich crimson Genoa velvet, covered with gold 
lace; a canopy surmounts it, in the centre of 
which is a star embroidered in gold. There are 
three steps to ascend, on the summit of which is a 
chair of states, of exquisite workmanship. There 
aro a few painting^, and the piers of the room are 
filled np with pier-glasses, the cornices being 
richly gilt At the back of this apartment is Her 
Majesty's closet, in which she gives audience, and 
Kceives the members of her own family, cabinet 
ministers, &c Beyond it is the Queen's dressing- 
room. There is ako a splendidly fitted up apart-' 
ment, used as the supper-room. One of the rooms 
was the birth-place of James, the son of James II., 
•fterwards styled the Pretender. 

St James's Square is 138 yards in diameter, and 
Itts in the centre a circular sheet of water, from 
the middle of which rises a statue of William III. 

In Pall Mall East is Sufifblk Street, which con- 
tains the gallery of the Society of British Artists : 



it is entered by a portico, and consists of a suite 
of six rooms. This society was instituted in 182.3, 
for the annual exhibition and sale of the works of 
living artists in painting, sculpture, architecture, 
and engraving. Near it is a house, erected in 
1821, for the exhibition of the Society of Water- 
Colour Drawings. The British Institution, in 
Pall Mall, is another gallery for the exhibition of 
paintings. 

OOVENT QARDEV, LONO-ACEE, &C. 

Govent Garden, or, as it was originally called, 
Convent Garden, anciently belonged to the ab- 
bots of Westminster, and extended from Drury 
Lane to St. Martin's Lane. On the dissolu- 
tion it was granted to the Duke of Somerset, 
and afterwards to the Earl of Bedford, whose 
descendant, Francis, let it on a building lease, 
and had a church erected by Inigo Jones, 
who also constructed the piazza, which still re- 
mains, on the north-east. This church, which 
stood on the west side, was burnt down in 1795, 
but was rebuilt by Mr. Hardwicke, on the plan of 
Inigo Jones, and is now one of the most pleasing edi- 
fices in London. It has an illuminated dial. In the 
churchyard are buried Samuel Butler, the famous 
author of * Hudibras ; ' Dr. Wolcot, better known 
as Peter Pindar ; and many other persons of note. 
The space of ground between the church and the 
market, is the place where the elections for West- 
minster generally take place. The present market 
for fruits, flowers, and vegetables, was re-erected, 
from designs by Mr. Fowler, in 1829-30. It con- 
sists of three ranges of shops, running from east to 
west, intersected by three alleys, which perforate 
the area longitudinally, and three which intersect 
it. The market is altogether extremely commo- 
dious and handsome. 
' Covent Garden Theatre is a great ornament to 
Bow Street : a patent was granted for a theatre 
here, soon after the Restoration, to Sir W. Dave- 
nant, whose company was called the ** Duke's ser- 
vants," out of compliment to the Duke of York, 
the king's brother. In 1732, a new theatre was 
opened here by the celebrated Rich, which was 
burnt down in 1808. The present edifice was 
then erected, and opened on the 18th of Septem- 
ber of the following year, under the management 
of Mr. John Kemble, who attempted to raise the 
prices of admission, when the celebrated *' O.P. 
(old prices) Riot " was commenced. This theatre 
is built in a square form ; Mr. Smirke, the archi- 
tect, having constructed it on the model of the grand 
Temple of Minerva at Athens. The audience 
portion of the building has lately been consider- 
ably enlarged, to fit it for the representation of 
Grerman and Italian operas, which are performed 
here with the greatest magnificence during the 
summer season. 

In Bow Street there is a Police Office, in which 
three magistrates preside. In Great Queen Street 
is the printing-office of Messrs. Cox and Son, 
which contains the press at which Benjamin 
Franklin worked as A journeyman, when he was 
in the employ of Mr. Watt of Duke Street. The 
Hall of the Freemasons' Tavern in this street, is 
one of the largest rooms in London, and is orna- 
mented with portraits of the royal family; it is 




celebrated for public dinners and meetings fre- 
quently held here. In the- time of Charles I. and 
II., Great Queen Btreet was the most fashionable 
part of the town, and contained the houses of seve- 
ral of the nobility. Among the most famous of its 
former inhabitants may bo mentioned I^rd Her- 
bert of Cherbury, 8ir Godfrey Knell^r, and Rad- 
diffe, the physician to Queen Anne. 

Drury Lane takes its name from the mansion of 
the great family of the Drurys, which stood at 
the comer of Drury Lane, on the site of the Olym- 
pic Theatre. Drury Lane was the residence of ■ 
Nell Gwynn, and Pepys gives the following ac- | 
count of seeing her here. May 1, 1667. — To , 
Wettminster^ in the leay^ meeting many milkmaids 
toith garlands upon their pails^ dancing with afid- 
dler before them; and saw pretty Nelly standing 
at her lodgings door in Drury Ixine, in her smock 
sleeves and bodice, looking upon one, JSJte Seemed 
a mighty pretty creature, A theatre, existed here 
as far back as the time of Shaks])eare, which was 
then called the Pfacenix, and had originally been 
a cock-pit; it was destroyed in 1617, by a mob of 
puritans. It was, however, rebuilt, but the the- 
atrical representations were suspended until soon 
after the Restoration, when the king granted a 
patent to Thomas Killigrew, whose players were 
called the King's Company, and who rebuilt the 
theatre on the site of the present edifice. His 
theatre, burnt down in 1671-2, was rebuilt by 
Sir C. Wren, and stood till 1741, when it was 
again rebuilt, but was again burnt to the ground 
in 1809, when the present substantial edifice was 
erected by B. Wyatt, Esq. 

lincolk's-inn-fisldb, &«. 

Lincoln's-Irni-Fields is the most extensive square 
in the metropolis, measuring 187 yards by 237, or 
848 yards in circumference. The gardens were 
laid out by Inig6 Jones, and occupy exactly the 
same space as the Great Pyramid of Egypt; he also 
planned. the buildings, but his design was not car* 
ried out In 1683, the patriotic Lord Russell was 
executed in the middle of this square. The large 
house at the comer of Great Queen Street, now 
divided into two, was built in 1686, by the Mar- 
quis of Powis, and has at different times been the 
residence of Sir Nathan Wright, Lord Chancellor 
Somen, and the Duke of Newcastle, who gave it 
its present appellation. In this square liave also 
resided Earl Camden, Lord Chancellor Lough- 
borough, Sir Fletcher Norton, speaker o^ the House 
of Commons, Lord Kenyon, Chief Justice of the 
Queen's Bench, and Sir Richard Fanshawe. 

The Royal College of Surgeons, which stands in 
this square, was erected by Mr. Dance, bat re- 
built in 1 836. The museum contains the collection 
of John Hunter, in which, says Sir Evcrard Homo, 
toe find an attempt to expose to view the gradatiofis of 
naturSy from the most simple state in which life is 
found to exist, up to the moat perfect and tJie moit | 
complex of the animal creation — man himself There 
is also an extensive collection of objects of natural 
history, the whole amounting to 20,000 specimens. 
The museum also contains several curiosities, 
among which is ih^ preserved wife of Van Butchell, 
in a mahogany box, with a square of glass over the 
fkce. 



^ir J. Soane's Museum itf a suite of four rooms, 
containing paintings by Canaletti and Hogarth, 
designs by Sir J. Soane, and a choice collection of 
Roman, Grecian, and Egyptian antiquities; it was 
presented to the nation, endowed with £30,000, 
by the late proprietor, in 1833. 

Portugal Street, to the south of Lincoln's-Inn- 
Fields, containa the luRolvent Debtors' Court. 
There are four commissioners who sit about four 
days in every fortnight, and are attended by bar- 
risters and agents, or attorneys. This court was 
established in order to release from prison the per- 
sons of those debtors who should give up their pro- 
perty for the benefit of their creditors. Between 
Lincoln's Inn Square and Chancery Lane, is situated 
Lincoln's Inn, of which Pennant gives the follow- 
ing account : The gate (leading from Chancery 
LaneJ is of brick, but of no small oniament to the 
street. It teas buHt by Sir Thotnas Lovely once a 
member of this Inn, and afterteixrds treasurer of ike 
houseltold to Henry VII, The other parts were re- 
built at different times, but much about the same period. 
None of tlte original building is left, for U was formed 
out of the house of the Black Friars, trhich fronted 
Holbom end of the palace of Ralph NevU, Chancellor 
of England and Bishop of Chichester ^ built by him 
in the reign of Henry III., on a piece of ground 
granted to him by the king. It continued to bein- 
hdbiied by some of the successors in tlte tee. This was 
the original site of the Dominican or Black Friars, 
before they removed to the spot now known by that 
name. On pari of the ground now covered with 
buildings, Henry Lacy, £arl of Lincoln, bmU an 
Inne, as it was in those days called, for himself, in 
which he died in 1312. Thewlicle has retained his 
name. One of fA« bishops of Chicftester, in after 
times, did grant leases of the buildings to certain 
students of the law, reserving to tliemselves a rent, 
and lodgings for themselves whenever they came to 
town. This seems to have taken place about the time 
of Henry VII. The chapel was designed by Inigo 
Jones f' it is built upon massy piUars^ and affords un- 
der its sltelter an excellent uxdk. This work etfinees 
that Inigo never was designed for a Goihic architect. 
The Lord Chancellor holds his sittings in the Oreat 
Hall. This hall is 62 feet long and 32 broad, and 
is ornamented with various coats of arms of mem- 
bers of the Inn, and a picture by Hogarth of Paul 
before Felix ; it has also a statue of Lord Erftkine, 
by Westmacott. In the gardens on the west side 
the members of the Inn have i^ecently erected a 
handsome and noble hall, containing ar spacious 
apartment for the dinners which take |^aee in term- 
time, a handsome library, with a splendid collec- 
tion of books, a spacious and commodious kitchen, 
and other apartments. 

HOLBORH, &c 

The name of Holbom is derived from a stream 
called the Oldboume, which formerly ran here. 
St. Andrew's Church, on the Hill, is a large edifice, 
erected in 1687 by Sir C. Wren ; the interior i« 
particularly beautiftU ; the famous Dr. Sacheverell 
preached here. Ely chapel is of great antiquity, 
and has a beautiful ancient Gothic window. 
Thavie's Inn, occupied chiefly by sofiertors, now 
the property of the Society of Lincoln's Inn, de- 
rived its name from John Tavye, temp. Edward III. 




Barnard's Inn, siinilariy occupied, is also situated 
in Holbom. 8tapl«'8 Inn, near it, tenanted in 
the same manner, is so called from having been 
in ancient times the place where the wool-mer- 
clttnts assembled; and was g^ven to the law stu- 
dents about the reign of Henry V. The hall con- 
tauis some portraits and casts of tho Twelve 
Caesars. FurnivaPs Inn, also in Holbom, and 
also similarly occupied, was anciently the resi- 
dence of the noble family of that name, now ex- 
tinct; the edifice was rebuilt in 1819, from designs 
by Mr. Peto. Gray's Inn, one of the inns of court 
for the admission of gentlemen as barristers, on 
the right of Holbom, derived its name from having 
fanserly been the residence of the ancient family 
of Gray of Wilton, by whom it was given to some 
law students in the reign of £dward III. The 
hall contains a singular oak screen, and some por- 
tmits: a spacious garden, which is open every 
day, also belongs to this Inn. 

THE BBITIBR IfUSBUlC, Ao. 

Great Russell Street, near Holbom, contains 
the British Museum, of which Sir Hans Sloane 
may be called the founder, as he offered the books 
and articles which had cost him £50,000, to the 
nation, for £20,000; in 1753 they were placed in 
Montagu House, one of the largest buildings in 
London. The Museum was afterwards increased 
by the addition of the Cottonian Library, which waB 
given to tho nation by its collector. Sir Robert Bruce 
Cotton, who was bom in 1570, and died in 16G2. 
The Harlcian Library contains 7,000 MSS., collect- 
ed by the Right Hon. Secretary Harley, together 
with the collection of ^ Simon d'Ewes, and was 
purchased for £10,000. The King's Libraries 
were presented to the public by George III., and 
George lY. also presented the library of his father; 
Dr. Bumey's classical library was purchased for 
£13,500. Besides these and other valuable col- 
leetions of books and MSS., there is the finest col- 
liection of Egyptian and other antiquities in the 
world, many of them presented by Col. Lethieullier ; 
the £imouB Elgin Marbles, purdiased for £35,000, 
the Herbariums of Sir Hans Sloane and Sir Joseph 
Baaks, the latter of whom, together with Captain 
Cook, presented many highly interesting artidea 
brought by them from the South Sea, &c. &c. A 
fine structure has lately been erected, in the Ionic 
style, for the custody of these valuable properties ; 
it is from the design of Sir R. Smirke. The edifice 
is of noUe proportions, the east wing being 500 
feet in leng^, with a portico of four lofty columns. 
The ground floor contains the Reading Room, the 
MSS. Room, and the King's Library ; the latter a 
splendid apartment, 300 feet long, 40 wide, and 30 
high, elegantly and commodiously fitted up : the 
MSS. Room is of cruciform shape, and contains 
MSS. of immense value. The Reading Room is 
htfge, and conveniently arranged with tables for 
the purposes of study, and every other appliance 
necessary for the pursuit of literary objects. The 
ground floor also contains the Gallery of Antiqui- 
ties, comprising an immense number of ancient 
sculptures, the most recherche specimens of ancient 
art, medals, gold coins, &c., and the famous Port- 
lanid Vase. The ground floor of the old building 
contains the old library of printed books ; the hall 



has several valuable and beautiful sculptures; the 
ceiling of the great staircase is decorated by the 
art of Charles de Posse, the famous French painter, 
and has also some fine landscapes by James Rous- 
seau. The upper floor contains curiosities from 
North America and the South Sea Islands, and 
other parts of the less known portions of the world. 
In the centre of the first room is the original 
Magna Charta, in a glass-case; the other rooms 
chiefly contain curiosities of all kinds in natural 

j history, brought from every part of the globe. 

I The sidoon, also, is a splendid room, adorned with 
numerous fine paintings. The Museum is open to 
the public every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 
except on the first week in January, May, and 
September, and on Christmas-day, Good Friday, 
and Ash Wednesday. The Reading Room is open 
every day except Sunday, and tho periods just 
mentioned ; but the Gallery of Antiquities can only 
be visited under certain restrictions. 

In the neighl)ourhood of Russell Street, &c., there 
are several spacious and handsome squares, con- 
taining substantial and commodious residences. 
Russell Square contains a colossal bronze statue of 
the late Duke of Bedford, by Westmacott; Sir 
Thomas Lawrence resided at No. 65 Bloomsbury 
Square, formerly the residence of Lady Russell — it 
is ornamented with a colossal bronze statue of tho 
Right Hon. Charles James Fox, by Westmacott. 
Tavistock Square is remarkable for a peculiar echo, 
which is perceived there. Euston Square contains 
St. Paucras New Church, which was erected by 
Mr. Inwood, at a cost of £76,000, in 1822, and is 
built in imitation of the temple of Erectheus at 
Athens ; it has a beautiful portico, and a steeplo 
168 feet in height. The interior is very elegant; 
the pulpit and reading-desk are formed from the 
tree well known as the Fairlop Oak. 

GuUdford Street, a fine range of buildings, con- 
taiiiB the Foundling Hospital, a structure con- 
sisting of two brick wings, between which is the 
chapel, which is much resorted to ; the organ was 
presented by Handel, and there is a beautiful 
altar-piece by West The interior of the house 
contains several fine paintings. The project of a 
foundling hospital was first promulgated in Queen 
Anne*s reign, and several persons left legacies for 
tho purpose of forwarding it, but it was not till 
1739 that a charter was obtained from George II., 
by the spirited exertions of Mr. Thomas Coram, 
the master of a vessel trading to the American 
colonies. TAe object of the institution is the 
maintenance and education of exposed nnd de- 
serted young children, but the character and the 
necessities of the mother, together with the deser- 
tion of the father, are at first strictly inquired 
into. There are generally about 460 children 
under the protection of this institution ; tho funds 
are about xl3,250, resulting from rents, dividends, 
produce of the chapel, children's work, general 
benefactions, and other sources. Tho boys are 
apprenticed to different employments at the age of 
twelve or thirteen, and the girls at fourteen. 

ST. GILES'S, Ac 

In Broad Street, in the parish of St. Giles, stands 
the church of St. Giles' s-in-the-Fields, a fine build- 
ing of Portland stone, erected by Henry Flitcroft 



in 1730, on the site of an ancient hospital, before 
which Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham, was 
burnt in the reign of Henry V. There is a tower 
at the west end with a fine steeple ; the Resurrec- 
tion Gate, at the north-west, has a fine bronze re- 
presentation of the Resurrection. This church 
contains a monument to the memory of Sir Roger 
1' Estrange ; it is also the burial-place olf Andrew 
Marvel, of Richard Pendrell, the conductor of 
Charles II. after the battle of Worcester ; of 
Chapman, the first translator of Homer, and of the 
great sculptor Flaxman. Sir J. Soane is interred 
in the burying-ground of the parish in St. Pan- 



eras. 



OXFORD STREET, &C. 



Between Oxford Street and Camden Town, is an 
entrance to the Regent's Park : this extensive piece 
of ground originally belonged to a pala<;e of 
Queen Elizabeth, which stood towards the north 
of the Tottenham Court Road, and was pulled down 
in 1791 ; the property was subsequently let to va- 
rious persons, but on the expiration of the leases 
it reverted to the crown, and in 1814 those altera- 
tions were made in it, from designs by Mr. Nash, 
which have rendered it such an ornament to the 
metropolis. The park extends over about 450 
acres, and is nearly circular; it is laid out in shrub- 
beries, ornamented with a fine sheet of water, and 
intersected by roads in various directions. There 
are several villas within the enclosure, and it is 
entirely surrounded by fine, handsome, and elegant 
residences, inhabited by noble and opulent per- 
sons. Cumberland Terrace, erected by Mr. Nurse, 
is a fine specimen of architecture. Gloucester 
Gate, one of the entrances, is a neat Doric struc- 
ture, and near it is the entrance to the Zoologrical 
Gardens, the property of the Zoological Society, 
which was instituted in 1826, by Sir Stamford 
Raffles, Lord Auckland, Sir H. Davy, and other 
scientific persons. The Gardens and Menagerie 
were opened in 1828, and have become a place of 
great resort, for besides containing an interesting 
and valuable collection of animals, they are laid 
out with great taste and efiect. They have also 
been added to by a piece of ground on the other 
side of the road, under which a tunnel has been 
constructed. William IV., in 1830, presented the 
society with the animals from the Tower. The 
Zoological Society has also an interesting Museum 
in Leicester Square. Near these gardens there is 
an elegant bridge, called Macclesfield Bridge, cross- 
ing the Regent's Canal, on the northern boundary 
of the park ; it was erected from designs by Mr. 
Morgan, and consists of three arches, supported by 
cast-iron Doric pillars. In this park there is also 
a building in the occupation of the Toxophilite So- 
ciety, attached to which there are five acres of 
land for archery sports. The Ring is a fine level 
drive, planted on either side with trees, and sur- 
rounding a tasteful shrubbery. On one side of 
Regent's Park stands the Colosseum, so called 
from its immense size; it was erected in 1827-8, 
for the purpose of exhibiting Mr. Homer's Pano- 
rama of London. Oxford Street contains the 
Princess's Theatre, originally a bazaar; it is a 
commodious and handsome building: also the ba- 
zaar, known as the Pantheon. Grosvenor Square, 



to the south of Qxford Street, contains six acres of 
ground; in the centre there is a gilt equestrian 
statue of George I. Portman Square is 606 yards 
in circumference. Cavendish Square contains a 
gilt equestrian statue of WiUiam, Duke of Cum- 
berland. Hanover Square contains a colossal 
statue of Pitt, by Chantrey. In Regent Street 
is the Polytechnic Institution, which is fitted up 
with all kinds of beautiful scientific apparatus, 
with which the most interesting experiments are 
performed, and lectures are delivered on subjects 
connected with practical science. This street has 
lately been considerably improved, by the remov- 
ing of the colonnade forming the Quadrant which 
stood at its southern extremity. The County Fire 
OBlce forms a handsome termination of the view 
up Waterloo Place, from Pall Mall. 

PICCADILLY, &c. 

Piccadilly contains several handsome residences, 
the principal of which is that at the western ex- 
tremity, Apsley House, the town residence of the 
Duke of Wellington. It was built originally for 
the Lord Chancellor Apsley, by the Messrs. Adam; 
having become the residence of the Duke of Wel- 
lington in 1828, it was entirely re-constructed by 
Sir J. Wyattville, and is now an extremely hand- 
some and commodious residence, containing seve- 
ral noble apartments : Canova's celebrated colossal 
statue of Napoleon, stands at the foot of the grand 
staircase. Burlington House, also in Piccadilly, 
is the residence of Lord Cavendish ; it has a sin- 
gularly beautiful facade, hidden, however, by a 
brick wall. Devonshire House, Gloucester House, 
Lord Eldon's residence, Lord Ashburton's resi- 
dence, are all of them noble specimens of architec- 
ture, and extremely commodious residences. Bur- 
lington Arcade, next to Burlington House, is a 
covered avenue, 210 yards in length. The Albany 
is a fine range of buildings, erected by Sir W. 
Chambers, and which was inhabited by the late 
Duke of York ; the gardens are now covered with 
buildings which are let out in lodgings to the no- 
bility. St. George's Hospital is situated at Hyde 
Park Comer ; it was erected in 1828 from designs 
by Mr. Wilkins, and the principal fapade is 200 feet 
in length ; it contains 29 wards and 460 beds, be- 
sides a theatre for the delivery of lectures. The 
hospital was established in 1733. The Egyptian 
Hall, which derives its name from the style of ar- 
chitecture, was erected in 1812, from designs by 
Mr. G. F. Robinson. It is divided into various 
compartments, which are used as exhibition rooms. 
At the western extremity of Piccadilly near Aps- 
ley House, are two arches, one leading into Hyde 
Park, and the other forming an entrance to Buck- 
ingham Palace, down Constitution Hill. The arch 
which forms the entrance to Hyde Park was 
erected in 1828, and has a frontage of 107 feet. 
On the opposite side is another arch of the Co- 
rinthian order, erected from designs by Mr. Nash, 
surmounted by a colossal equestrian statue of the 
Duke of Wellington, by Wyatt, which forms a 
prominent object from every point of view. 

HYDE PARK, Soi. 

Hyde Park, which derives its name from having* 
been the manor gfthehyde belonging to the Abbey 



I 



t 



of Westminster, oomprises an area of 395 acres, 
And contains much beautiful scenery, with nu- 
nieroas fine trees. It is bounded on ike west by 
Eensiogton Grardens. At the south-east comer 
of the park there is a colossal statue by West- 
macott, with the following inscription : — To Ar- 
thur^ Duke of WelUngton, and hit hrave companions 
wamit, this status o/AchiUes^ ceistfirom caiinon taken 
in the battles of Salamanca, VUloria, Toulouse^ and 
Waterloo, is inscribed hy their countrtf women. There 
is tlso an inscription on the base : — Placed on this spot 
OS the ISth June, 1822, by command cf Jus Majesty 
George IV, The figrnre is about 18 feet high, and 
weighs upwards of 30 tons. The Serpentine Ri- 
rer is a sheet of water in the form of a parallelo- 
gram, constructed between 1730 and 1733, by or- 
der of Queen Caroline, and is much frequented by 
bathers in summer, and by skaters in winter; the 
west end is crossed by a handsome stone bridge. 
Beyond this, to the south, are the Knightsbridgo 
Barracks, opposite to which the immense building 
for the Great Exhibition for 1851 has been erected, 
under the superintendence of Mr. Pazton. There 
are five entrance gates with handsome lodges; it 
forms one of the finest structures in the world. 

eRESir PABK, Aa 

On the opposite side of Piccadilly is Constitution 
Hill, which separates Hyde Park from the Green 
Park and that called St. James's. The Green 
Park is situated between the two other parks, and 
on the north side is one of the reserroirs of the 
Chelsea Water Works. At the comer of the 
Green Park stands Sutherland House, which was 
erected in 1825, by Mr. B. Wyatt, for the Duke of 
York, on whose death it was purchased by the 
Marquis of Stafford, whose son, the Duke of Suther- 
land, now resides in it. It has four fronts cased 
with stone, the principal one, on the north, having 
a portico of eight Corinthian columns. The apart- 
ments are of noble proportions, and luxuriously 
fitted up; the picture gallery is 130 feet in length. 

Spencer House, the family residence of Earl 
Spencer, is a noble Palladian edifice, the facade 
towards the Green Park being ornamented with 
statues and rases ; the library contains one of the 
finest collection of books in the kingdom. 

BucKnraHAif falace, st. jaues's pabk, Ao. 

8t James's Park was enclosed and laid out by 
Heniy VIII., after he had built St. James's Palace, 
befi)re which time it was a mere marsh. Charles 1 1, 
greatly improred it, had it increased by the addi- 
tion of several fields, and planted it with rows of 
lime trees, and employed Le Notre to lay out the 
Mall, a vista nearly a mile long, which then had an 
iron hoop at the end of it, for playing at a game 
called the mall, from which this fine avenue de- 
rives its name. A canal was also constructed here 
100 feet m breadth, and 2,800 in length. Succeed- 
ing sovereigns gave the people permission to walk 
here, until it has become public property. In 
1828 the park was much improved. Bird-cage 
Walk has been straightened, and there is a hand- 
some Doric chapel near the barracks, called Wel- 
lington C3iapel. 

On the west side stands Buckingham Palace, 
the town residence of Her Majesty and the Royal 



Family. A palace was erected here in 1703, on 
the site of what was called the Mulberry Gardens, 
by the learned John Sheffield, Duke of Bucking- 
ham. In 1761 it became the residence of Queen 
Charlotte, and here all her children were bom ; 
several of the Royal Family have also been mar- 
ried here. Between 1825 and 1830 the building 
was entirely re-constmcted, under the superinten- 
dence of Mr. Nash; it was afterwards much im- 
proved and added to, under the superintendence 
of Mr. Blore. The entrance-hall is paved with 
variegated marble ; the ceiling rests upon twenty- 
four white marble columns, ornamented with 
Corinthian capitals of mosaic gold. The grand 
staircase, leading from the hall to the state rooms, 
which are fitted up with great splendour, is 
formed of solid blocks of white marble. The 
Grand Saloon is ornamented with Corinthian co- 
lunms, to imitate lapis lazuli^ which have gilt 
capitals, supporting a rich cornice and frieze ; the 
floor is inlaid with satin and Amboyna wood. 
The Throne Room is hung with crimson silk, and 
richly gilt, the ceiling being finaUy embossed, 
and the frieze containing bcusi rUievi, designed 
by Stothard and executed by Bailey, representing 
the wars of York and Lancaster; the throne stands 
in an alcove at the end of the apartment. The 
Picture Gallery is a noble saloon, 164 feet by 28, 
appropriately ornamented and well lighted. The 
grand entrance in front of the palace is formed by 
a front of superb Italian architecture, designed and 
executed by Mr. Barry; and part of St. James's 
Park has been enclosed, in order to form a new 
and extensive esplanade in front of the palace. 
The arch which formerly stood here was modelled 
from that of Constantino at Rome ; it was adorned 
with sculpture by Bailey and Westmacott. 

In the centre of the park there is a fine sheet of 
ornamental water, and a shrubbery beautifully 
laid out. On the east side is the back of the 
Admiralty and Horse Guards, and the front of the 
Treasury, forming an extensive fapade of a very 
imposing appearance. Opposite the Horse Guards 
there is a fine open space of ground, in which one 
of the regiments of the Foot Guards parades daily. 
Two great guns stand in this area, one of which, 
a Turkish piece of ordnance, brought from Alex- 
andria by the British troops, is of immense length, 
and is carved with various emblematical figures. 
The other is the mortar brought from the siege of 
Cadiz in 1812, and presented by the Spanish g^ 
vemment : it is 8 feet long, 12 inches in diameter 
at the mouth, and capable of throwing a shell 
three miles. It stands on an allegorical carriage, 
cast at Woolwich : the weight of the whole is 16 
tons. 

CHARIKG CROSS, Ac. 

Hartshorn Lane, Charing Cross, is* supposed to 
have been the birth-place of Ben Jonson. WTien 
a little child, says Fuller, he Uved in Hartshorn 
Lane, Charing Cross, when his mother married a 
bricklayer for her second husband. He was first 
bred in a private school in St, Martinis Court; then 
in Westminster School, In the time of the second 
Duke of Buckingham, there was a celebrated house 
of entertainment at Charing Cross, called * Locket's 
Ordinary,' in which the scene is often laid in the 



plays of Vanbrngh, Gibber, &c. It wag frequented 
hy the celebrated Sir George Etheridge, of whom 
the following anecdote is told in Birch's MSB. : — 
Sir G. Eiheridge discontinued LockeVa ordinary^ 
having run itp a score which he could not conveniently 
discharge, Mrs. Locket sent one to dun him, and to 
Utreaten him with a prosecution. He hid the messenger 
teU her that lie would kiss her if she stirred a step in it. 
When this answer was brought back, she caUed for 
her hood and scarfs and told her husband^ who inter- 
posed, that " she'd see if there was any fellow aUve 
who had the impudence." " Fr^ythee, my dear^ donH 
be 80 rash, said her husband; you donH know what a \ 
man may do in his passion." The *^ Rummer " | 
tavern, which stood in the vicinity, is that where 
Prior was found, when a boy, reading Horace, by 
the Earl of Dorset, who took him under his patron- 
age, and removed him from his ancle, who kept the 
tavern. It was over the shop of Mr. Egerton, 
bookseller, that Thomson wrote a part of hitf " Sea- 
sons.'' 

A splendid palace, appropriated for the recep- 
tion of the kings of Scotland when they visited 
London, stood on the site of the present Scotland 
Yard. 

The Metropolitan Police Office is situated here. 
The metropolitan police, established by the late 
Sir R. Peel, comprehends all portions of the me- 
tropolis and its vicinity, out of the jurisdiction of 
the city, and within twelve miles of Charing 
Gross. This district is formed into divisions of 
various sizes, but with the same number of men 
and officers; and there is in each division a 
station or watch-house, from which point the 
duty is carried on. Each division is known by 
a local name and a letter of the alphabet, and is 
divided into eight sections, and each section into 
eight beats. There are as many companies in 
this force as there are divisions, each company 
comprising 1 superintendent, 4 inspectors, 16 ser- 
geants, and 144 constables. These companies 
are again divided into sixteen parties, each con- 
sisting of 1 sergeant and 9 men, and 4 sergeants' 
parties form an inspector's party. The entire 
police force is under the superintendence of three 
commissioners, whose office is in Scotland Yard. 
Each man has the letter of his division marked on 
the collar of his coat, together with a number 
which corresponds with his name in the books of 
the office. The first sixteen numbers in each di- 
vision are the sergeants. The policemen are all 
dressed in blue uniform, and at night they wear 
dark-brown greatcoats : each of them has a rattle, 
a staff, and a lantern. They are always on duty, 
but more are employed at night than in the day. 
One part is on duty from nine in the evening till 
six o'clock in the morning. The day police are 
relieved at certain periods in the same way. 

In Whitehall Yard stands the Naval and Mili- 
tary Library and Museum, a plain and commo- 
dious edifice, containing more than 1,200 volumes, 
and several curious and interesting articles, among 
which is the sword worn by the Doke of Welling- 
ton at Waterloo. 

THE ADHISALTT, &a 

The Admiralty Office, a large handsome build- 
ing of brick and stone, stands on the right of 



Whitehall. There is here a large hall and 
several offices, besides six fine houses for the 
lords of the Admiralty. The Admiralty office, says 
Pennant, stood originally in Duke Street, West- 
minster ; but, in (he reign of King William, it was 
removed to the present spot, to the house then enUed 
WaUin^ord, I believe, from its having been inhabited 
by the KnoUys, Viscounts WaUingford. From the 
roof, the pious Usher, Archbishop of Armagh, then 
living here with the Countess ofl^terborough, was pre- 
vailed on to take ^ last sight of his beloved master, 
Charles /., when brought on the scaffold before White^ 
hcdl. He sunk at the horror of the sigM, and was 
carried in a ewoon to his apartment. Wallingford 
House was the birth-place of George YiUiers, 
second Doke of Buckingham. 

The Horse Quards, beyond the Admiralty, is so 
called from being the station where that body of 
troops generally do duty. It is a handsome and sub- 
stantial edifice of hewn stone, erected by Ware about 
1730, having a centre and two wings ; there are 
arched foot and carriage ways through it from 
Whitehall into St. James's Park, and the centre is 
surmounted by a cupola containing an excellent 
clock. On the front, towards Whitehall, there are 
two small archways where horse soldiers in full 
uniform mount guard daily. The office of the 
commander-in-chief is in this building. On the 
opposite side of the way is Whitehall Ghapel, or 
Banqueting-room, which is all that remains of the 
royal palace of Whitehall, the greater portion of 
which was destroyed by fire in 1697. The man- 
sion was originally butlt by Hubert de Burgh, Earl 
of Kent, at the commencement of the thirteenth 
century. It then became the property of the 
Archbishops of York, who used it as their town 
residence, until it was purchased by Henry VIII. 
of Cardinal Wolsey, in 1530. It then became the 
residence of the court, and so continued till its ac- 
cidental destruction. Charles I. was executed on 
a scaffold in fVont of this building, on the SOth 
January, 1649, being conducted through an open- 
ing in the north wall, which now forms a doorway 
to a more modem erection. The principal room 
is an oblong apartment forty feet in height. The 
ceiling is painted with a representation of the apo- 
theosis of James I. by Rubens, who was paid 
£3,000 for it; Cipriani, who since retouched it, 
received £2,000 for doing so. This room was con- 
verted into a chapel-royal by George I., and ser- 
vice is now performed in it every Sunday morning 
and afternoon. The entire building was repaired 
in 1829. 

Between this edifice and the Thames is White- 
hall Gardens, in which stands a fine bronze statue 
of James II., executed by Grinlin Gibbons, a year 
previous to the abdication of James. One of the 
handsome mansions which stand here was the town 
residence of the late Sir Robert Peel, and that in 
which he died in August, 1850. 

THB TREASUBV, *0. 

Near the Hone Guards stands the handsome 
stone building used as the Treasury; that por- 
tion which stands in Whlt-ehall formed part of 
the ancient palace belonging to Cardinal Wol> 
sey; the faQade towards the park, designed by 
Kent, consists of three stories in the Tuscan, the 



ixm 



93 



LON 



Dono, *nd the lofiio stylos of «rehiteetiiTe, tho 
whole beiag sormoniited by a pediment. TfaiSf 
together witli the Goancil-ofiice, whk^ stands next 
to it, has reoeatly beea much improved by the eon- 
stnietioB of a regular aad haadaome facade towards 
Whitehidl, extending from the Treasury to the 
comer of Downing Street, through which it Is oon- 
tinuad for the offices of the Foreign and Home 
defMwtments. The Cotmeil Chamber, on the west 
end of the bvilding, is a noble apartment, adorned 
with lonio coiumns, tiM shafts of which we in 
imitation of Sienna marble, and the capitals of 
whits maible ; ber Majesty's PriTy Gounoti hold 
their sittings in this apartment, to decide on appeals 
from the tribunals of the East and West Indies. 
The Board of Trade also holds its sittings in this 
building. The secretary of state for the Home 
depsrtment has likewise offices here, and those of 
the secretaries of state for the Foreign and Colo- 
nial departments are situated in Downing Street, 
where is also the official residence of the prime 
minbter. 

At the end of Parliament Street are Westminster 
Abbey, Westminster Hall, the Houses of Parlia- 
ment, Westminster Bridge, and Palace Yard. 

Westminster Hall was erected by William Rufhs 
ftboQt 1097, and here, says Stow, King WtUiam 
kept kufcut of WMts&ntide very royally, it was at 
first only a baaqneting-room to a palace of still 
greater antiquity, which stood on the 'site of Old 
Palaoe Yard, and which, according to Stow, hath 
kten the principal ieat andpaifaee of all the kings of 
BagUmd timee the Qmqvett; for heft have they in the 
yreai hall kept their feasts ofeoronatien espedaUy^ and 
9tksr solemn feasts, as at Christmas and such like^ 
MMl commonly; for proof whereof I find recorded, 
that in the year 1236, and the 20eA o/ Henry III., 
m the ^th of December, William de ffaverhuU, the 
kin^s treasurer, is commanded, that vpon the day of 
(Xmtmeision ofenr Lord, he oansed six thousand poor 
people to he fed at Westminster, for the slate of the 
king, the queen, and their children. Henry's suc- 
cessors held their feasts here ; and again, to quote 
from Stow — This great hall was begun to be repaired 
in Ute year 1397 by Richard IL, who caused the 
wa&s, windows, and roof to be taken down and new 
mads, with a stately porch, ajtd divers lodgings of a 
Morsefiotts work, and with great costs; aU which he 



of strangers banished or flying out of their 
countries, who obtained Kcense to remain in this land 
by the hin^s charters, which they had purchased with 
great sums of money; John BotereU being then derk 
of the works. This haU being finished in the year 
1398, ike same king kept a most royal Christmas 
there, with daily joustings and runnings at HU; 
wksremnto resorted sw^ a number of people, that 
there was every day spent twenty-eight or twenty-six 
oxen, and three hundred sheep, besides fowl without 
number. He eansed a gown for himself to be made 
of gold, garnished unth pearl and precious stones, to 
tAe value of three thousand marks; he was guarded 
by Cheshire men, and had about him commonly thir- 
teen bishops, besides barons, knights, esquires, and 
others more than needed; insomnch, ^tat to the house- 
hold came every day to meet ten thousand people, as 
eppeareth by the messes told out from the htchen to 
^ree hundred servitors. Parliaments were fre- 
quently held here in ancient times, and this hall 



has been always the usual place of the administra- 
tion of justice. It is one of tho largest rooms in 
£urope unsupported by pillars, being 270 feet 
long, 90 feet high, and 74 feet broad. It is orna- 
mented in all parts with angels supporting the 
arms of Richard II., or those of Edward the Con- 
fessor, the hart couehant under a tree being a device 
of the former monarch. The roof is very curiously 
constructed of chesnut wood. The whole of the 
interior has recently been coated with Portland 
stone. 

THIS OOUnTS OF LAW, &C. 

The Courts of Chancery, Quecn*s Bench, Ex- 
chequer, and Common Pleas, have been held in 
Westminster Hall since the reign of Henry III. 
Charles I. was* tried here in 1648, and peers and 
distinguished personages accused of high treason, 
and other high crimes and misdemeanours, are 
generally tried here, as was the esse with tho late 
Lord MelviQe and Warren Hastings. The coro- 
nation feasts also take place in this hall. On 
the north side of it are the Courts of Law, a 
handsome range of buildings designed by Sir J. 
6oane, the first on the right hand being that of 
the Queen's Bench. The Lord Chief Justice of 
England, assisted by four puisne Judges, presides 
in it. The Court of Exchequer is an institution 
of great antiquity, having been established by 
William I., and, until within a few years, had the 
power of Judging both according to law and to 
equity. The Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, 
and three other barons, preside as Judges. Be- 
sides these there is a fifth, called Cursitor Baron, 
who has, however, no judicial capacity, and whose 
office is almost a sinecure. The exchequer records 
are of great importance ; the most ancient of them, 
the great roll of the fifth year of the reign of Ste- 
phen, consists of sixteen large rolls, written on both 
Bides. The Court of Common Pleas has a general 
jurisdiction, and extends to all England. This 
court is presided over by the Lord Chief Justice 
of the Common Pleas, assisted by four puisne 
justices, and has several officers belonging to it. 
The Vice-Chancellor's Court is surmounted by a 
dome ; it was erected in 1823. The Vice-Chancel- 
lor assists the Lord Chancellor in hearing motions, 
&c. The Lord Chancellor's Court is a spacious 
square room, with a handsome circular gallery, 
and is surmounted by a dome. The Court of Chan- 
cery is the highest court of judicature in England 
next to the parliament, and has two jurisdictions, 
one at common law and the other at equity; 
the former, however, is seldom or never resorted to. 
The Lord High Chancellor of England is the sole 
Judge, and he is created so by his having the 
custody of the Great Seal. The Lord Chancellor 
has hitherto had a seat in the cabinet, and been 
removable at pleasure, but in consequence of tho 
frequent change of chancellors which takes place 
with every change of the sovereign's advisers, and 
which is productive of much delay and inconve- 
nience in the Court of Chancery, it is now gene- 
rally supposed to be the intention of the legishitnre 
to separate the political and judicial functions of 
the Chancellor at an early period. In Westminster 
Hall there is also another court, for the Master of 
the Rolls. 



THE HOUSES OF FAKLIAMERT, &c. 

In Old Palace Yard, at the back of Westminster 
Hall, stood St. Stephen's Chapel, which was erected 
by King Stephen. Edward 111. rebuilt it in 1347, 
and made it a collegiate church, with a dean and 
twelve secular priests belonging to it. It was 
afterwards sun'endered to Edward VI., who appro- 
priated it to the purposes of the parliament. The 
Commons of Great Britain held their sessions in it 
till 1834, on the 16th of October, in which year a 
conflagration took place which entirely destroyed 
the Chapel, as well as the House of Lords, together 
with the Painted Chamber, which was used as a 
place of conference between the Lords and Com- 
mons, and where the celebrated interviews oc- 
curred between the two houses which preceded the 
lie volution of 1688. The celebrated Star Cham- 
ber, which took its name from the Starra, or Jew- 
ish covenants deposited there by liichard I., was 
also destroyed. Some temporary buildings were 
erected from designs by Sir R. Sryirke, at a cost of 
£30,000, in which the Houses of Lords and Com- 
mons might hold their sittings until the completion 
of the New Houses of Parliament. In 1836, 
the new building was commenced by the throw- 
ing up of an embankment 30 feet wide, extending 
to the second arch of Westminster Bridge. It 
is as yet far from completion, and the expense, 
which was at first estimated at £700,000 or 
£800,000, has increased, by successive parliamen- 
tary grants, to nearly two millions. The sti*uc- 
ture, which covers nine acres of ground, presents 
towards the river a magnificent facade of highly 
ornamented Gothic, extending from Westminster 
Bridge to Millbank, about 900 feet in length. It is 
three stories high, and divided into a centre and 
wings, the centre being elevated by a loftier and 
more enriched battlement above the other parts of 
the building, and terminated by octagonal em- 
battled towers, with oriel windows in the centre. 
Each wing will be terminated by two solid square 
towers. Toward Abingdon Street, the building is 
terminated by a stupendous square tower, which 
occupies an area of 100 feet square, and, when 
completed, will be nearly 400 feet in height. This 
will be the royal entrance, and the upper part of 
the tower will consist of fire-proof apartments, 
designed as receptacles for the national records. 
A corresponding tower, towards the bridge and on 
the other side of Westminster Hall, from which 
will be formed an entrance to the chambers, is also 
in the course of erection. The House of Commons 
stands in a central part of the building, on the 
principal floor, between Westminster Hall and the 
river front. The House of Lords, which occupies 
a corresponding situation on the other side, is a 
splendid specimen of Gothic architecture. This 
spacious apartment is highly ornamented with ex- 
quisite carving, and there are galleries round it for 
the accommodation of visitors; that facing the 
throne is used by repprters for the daily press. 
The throne is a beautiful piece of workmanship, 
surmounted by a canopy, and highly embellished. 

HEW PALACE TABD, &e. 

Opposite the stupendous building appropriated 
to the parliament, is Westminster Abbey and St. 



Margaret's Church, which are already described. 
Opposite New Palace Yard there is a fine bronze 
statue of Canning. The Guildhall, Westminster, 
to the west of New Palace Yard, is erected on part 
of the ancient sanctuary. It is an octagonal 
building, entered through a vestibule supported by 
massy Doric columns. It is used as a court of 
sessions for Westminster, and here is also held the 
Court of Review ; behind it is a quadxang^ar Do- 
ric structure, used as the mews for the members of 
the two houses of parliament. Near it is a hand- 
some Grothio edifice, erected by Mr. luwood, for 
the purposes of the Westminster Hospital, which 
was instituted in 1719 for the relief of the sick 
and needy from aU parts of the metropolis. It 
contains 230 beds : patients are admitted by the 
order of a governor, except cases of accidents, 
which are taken in at any hour of the day without 
recommendation. A gift of £30, or three guineas 
per annum, constitutes a trustee. 

MILLBANK, &C. 

At the western extremity of Westminster is 
Millbank, in which stands the Church of St. John 
the Evangelist, one of the fifty new churches 
erected soon after the time of Sir C. Wren« This 
church is about 140 feet long, 90 broad, and 50 
high, and was the first church in London that was 
lighted with gas. Millbank Penitentiary is an 
extensive building of the octagon form, endosiug 
about eighteen acres of gpround, in which there are 
seven distinct though connected buildings, all the 
rooms in them fiocing the residence of the principal 
master, which is in the centre. The prison has 
accommodation for about 500 prisoners of either 
sex ; and all the male, inmates are employed in 
various manufactures, while the females are under 
the control of officers of their own sex. This per- 
son is under the control of a committee named by 
the Privy Council, and no one can be admitted 
without an order from the Secretary of State, or 
unless he is accompanied by one of the committee. 
In front of this building there is a fine gravel walk 
along the bank of the Thames. 

THE BRIDGES. 

Near the Penitentiary is Vanxhall Bridge, af- 
fording the inliabitants of Lambeth, Yauxhall, &c, 
an easy means of communication with the houses 
of parliament, Pimlico, and the vicinity. This 
bridge was originally projected by Mr. R. Dodd, 
but was erected from designs, first by Mr. Bennie, 
afterwards by Mr. Walker, at an expense of about 
£150,000, which is to be defrayed by a tolL The 
first stone was laid in 1813, and the structure was 
completed in 1816. It consists of nine cast-iron 
arches, 78 feet in span, and 29 high ; the piers are 
faced with Kentish ragstone and Roman cement : 
the entire length of the bridge is 860 feet. The 
next bridge towards London is that of West- 
minster, which crosses the Thames at a spot where 
it is 1,223 feet in width. This bridge, which it is 
now proposed to pull down in consequence of the 
expense incurred in keeping it in a proper state of 
repair, was commenced in 1739, and completed in 
1750, from designs by Monsieur Labelye, and at a 
cost of £389,000, which was defrayed by parlia- 
ment. The bridge is entirely of Portland stone. 



■ 

I 



and oonsists of fcmiteen piers, and thirteen large 
and two smaller arches, all of them semicircular ; 
that in the centre is 76 feet in width, and the rest 
decrease four feet each from the other ; so that the 
last two arches of the thirteen larger ones are 
each 52 feet. The two small arches at the ahnt- 
ments are 20 feet wide. The bridge is 44 feet in 
width, haying on either side a footway seven feet 
broad for passengers. There was formerly a stone 
balnstrade on the parapets, but that has been re- 
mored to lighten the weight on the snbstmctnre 
repairs which have lately taken place. The next 
bridge to this is the elegant Hungerford Snspension 
Bddge for foot passengers, which crosses the river 
from Hongerford Market to the Lambeth bank. 
There is a handsome arched approach from either 
bank of the river, the road or pathway being stone 
piers in the Italian style, by means of iron chains; 
on the Hongerford side tiie platform Joins the 
colonnade between the two taverns : the expense 
ineorred in the formation of this bridge was about 
£102,300. 

Next to this is the Strand or Waterloo Bridge, a 
noUe structure, commenced in 1811, and finished 
June 18, 1817 ; it was projected by Mr. G. Dodd, 
who designed it, but he was succeeded by Mr. 
Sennie, under whose superintendence it was com* 
pleted. It is a plain, but noble and imposing 
stmeture, and the outside courses are constructed 
of Cornish, and the balustrades of Aberdeen gran- 
ite. The arches aro elliptical, and of an equal 
size, and thus the road over them is level, and the 
bridge in this respect is different from any other in 
London. 

Beyond this bridge is that of Blackfriars, a 
handsome structure, erected from designs by Mr. 
R. Mylne, between 1760 and 1768, at a cost of 
£152,840, which was defrayed by a toll. There 
is a Latin inscription in a tin-plate over the first 
stone, stating the circumstances of its erection, 
and that the citizens had unanimously voted that 
it should bear the name of William Pitt, Earl of 
Chatham. There are nine elliptical arohes, the 
centre one being 100 feet in width. The entire 
length is 995 feet. 

Between Blackfriars and London Bridge, is that 
of Southwark, a stupendous structure, originally 
projected by Mr. John Wyatt, but commenced on 
the 23d of September, 1814, under the superin- 
tendence of Mr. Rennie, and completed Maroh, 
1819, at a total expense of £800,000, which is to 
be defrayed by tolls. This bridge consists of three 
cast-iron arohes, supported by massive stone piers 
and abutments. 

London Bridge, which is the next and the last 
bridge by which the river is crossed, is erected 
'ahoQt 200 feet to the west of a more ancient struc- 
tnre, which was commenced in 1 176, and com- 
pleted in 1209 ; it was then covered with houses, 
connected by large arohes of timber ; in 1212 a 
fire broke out at the Southwark extremity, and a 
great multitude came from London to assist in 
extinguishing it, when the flames communicated 
with the other side of the bridge, and upwards of 
3000 persons perished by fire and by water. 
Hans Holbein and John Bunyan at one time re- 
aided in the houses on this bridge, all of which 
were polled down in 1756. The bridge then con- 



sisted of nineteen stone arohes of various sizes, 
but having long been considered dangerous for 
vessels, and inconvenient for passengers, an act of 
parliament was passed in 1823, for building one 
more commodious and better adapted for the pur- 
poses of traffic. The first pile of the works was 
driven on March 15, 1824, and the lord mayor, 
Garratt, laid the first stone on the 15th June, 
1 825, in presence of a large number of the nobility 
and gentry. The structure was designed by the 
late Mr. Rennie, but was completed by his sons, 
who finished it by the 1st August, 1831, when it 
was opened by William IV. with great ceremony 
and magnificence. The length of the bridge, in- 
cluding the abutments, is 928 feet. 

SOUTHWARK, &C. 

On the Surrey side of London Bridge is the 
High Street of the borough of Southwark, to the 
right of which is the ancient churoh of St. Savi- 
our's, and the Ladye Chapel, of which a fine view 
is obtained from tiie High Street. It was known 
as St. Mary Overie, until the union of the two 
parishes of St. Margaret and St. Mary Magdalene, 
in the reign of Henry I. This churchy says Stow, 
or tome other in place thereof, was of olfil time, long 
before the Conquest, a house of sisters, founded by a 
maiden named Mary ; unto the which house and siS' 
ters she left (as was left to her by her parents) the 
oversight and profits of a cross ferry, or traverse 
ferry, over the Thames, there hept before that any 
bridge was built. This house of sisters was after, 
by Strithin, a nohle lady, converted into a college of 
priests, who, in place of the ferry, built a bridge of 
timber, and from time to time k^t the same in good 
reparations, but lastly the same bridge was built of 
sUme; and then, in the year 1106, was this churdi 
again founded for canons regular, by William Pont 
de PArche and William Dauncy, knigJUs, Normans. 
The priory was burnt down about 1207, and soon 
afterwards removed further into the country. Pe- 
ter de Bupibus, or de la Boche, continues Stow, 
founded a large chapel of St. Mary Magdalene, in 
the said church of St. Marie Overie, which cJiapel 
uxis after appointed to be the parish church for the 
inJiabitants near adjoining. The Ladye Chapel, as 
it is now called, is one of the most beautiful speci- 
mens of ancient architecture in tlie metropolis. 
The church is a noble structure, with three aisles, 
and is remarkable as the spot from which Hollar 
took his views of London before and after the Fire. 
There are monuments here to the memory of Wil- 
liam Wtckham, Bishop of Lincoln; Bishop An- 
drews ; Gower, the celebrated poet, contemporary 
with Chaucer ; and Abraham Newland, Esq., for- 
merly chief cashier of the Bank of England. The 
dramatic authors Fletcher and Massinger lie buried 
here in one grave. 

On the opposite side of the road is St. Thomas's 
Hospital, a large building, composed of four quadran- 
gular courts. The front, towards the High Street, 
is ornamented with a brass statue, by Schncemak- 
ers, of Edward VI., with a representation of the 
halt and the maimed beneath him. This hospital 
was founded by Richard, prior of Bermondsey, in 
1213, and in 1538 was surrendered to Henry 
VIII. The mayor and citizens of London, in 
1551, purohased the manor of Southwark from 



LON 



96 



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EdwArd VI., together with this hoApital, which | 
they rep&ired and enlarged, admitting into it 260 
of the poor, the sick, and the helpless; in 1553 it 
was incorporated hy the king, together with Bnde- 
well, Bethlehem, St. Bartholomew, and Christ's 
hospitals. The original edifice having been much 
injured by time, as well as by fire, was rebuilt 
by voluntary subscription in 1693, and afterwards 
considerably added to by the governors in 1732. 

To the south of this hospital stands Guy's Hos- 
pital, another benevolent foundation, which owes 
its origin to Mr. Guy, an opulent citizen and book- 
seller of London, who, after having given immense 
sums to St. Thomas's, in 1721, at the age of 76 
commenced another hospital, which he lived to see 
nearly completed : ita erection and foundation cost 
him £18,793, and he bequeathed it an endowment 
of £219,499. Another great benefaetor was Tho- 
mas Hunt, Esq., who, in 1829, bequeathed it the 
sum of £200,000, ou condition of aocommodation 
being provided for 100 additional patients. The 
building is entered by an iron gate, leading into a 
square, in the centre of which stands a brass statue 
of Guy, by Schnecmakers. There is an inscrip- 
tion on the front of the pedestal, the other sides of 
which are ornamented by rilievi, representing the 
arms of Mr. Guy, our Saviour healing the impo- 
tent Man, and the good Samaritan. The edifice 
itself consists of a centre and two wings, with a 
separate edifice for lunatics at the back ; one of 
the wings contains a hall and rooms for public 
business, and the other a chapel, in which is a 
beautiful and justly-celebrated monument to the 
memory of Guy, who is represented in his livery- 
man's robe, raising from the ground a half-naked, 
emaciated -looking pauper, and pointing to the 
hospital, into which another sufi^rer is being oon- 
veyod. It was executed by T. Bacon, and cost 
£1,000. In the vaulU are the bodies of Mr. Guy 
and Mr. Hunt. 

At No. 75, in the Borough, is the Talbot Inn, 
which, as an inscription points ont, is the place of 
meeting of Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrims: the 
original house, called the Tabard, was burnt down 
in 1676, and the present building was erected on 
its site. The lines in the poem referring to it are 
these: — 

" Befell that in that season, on a day, 
In Southwarke, at the Tabard, aa I lagr, 
Readie to wenden on mj pilgrimngo 
To Canterburic, with devout courage, 
At night waa oome into that Iioaterie, 
Well nine-and-twentie in a companie, 
Of Bundrie foike, by adventure yfall, 
In fellowship, and pilgrimes were they all, 
That toward Ganterburie woulden ride, 
The chambers and the stables weren wide, 
And well we weren eased at the best." 

The Town Hall of Southwark is a building of 
brick, with a stone facade, consisting of a rustic 
basement, surmounted by several Ionic pilasters, 
with a balustrade above them. A court of record 
is held here every Monday, by the steward of the 
city of London. The elections of the members 
for this borough generally take place in front of 
the town-hall. At the comer of Dover Street 
stands St. George's Church, a brick building, with 
stone quoins, erected in 1737. Cocker, the arith- 
metician, was buried here in the old church, which 
waa built in 1695 ; and Bishop Bonner, who died 



in the Marshal sea prison, was inferred in the ad* 
joining cemetery, beneath the east window. 

Eastward of Southwark are situated Bermond- 
sey, Rotherhithe, and Deptford, which c(Mineet the 
metropolis with Gireenwich* 

The Queen's Bench Prison is an extemiTe build- 
ing, surrounded by a lofly brick waH, on the oat* 
side of which there are handsome apartments for 
the marshal or keeper. The building oontainB a 
chapel, and about 220 rooms, which are very 
small, and have one bed in each. This prisoB ia a 
place of confinement for debtors, and thtuse sen* 
tenced to imprisonment by tlie Court of Queen's 
Bench. Since the demolition of the Fleet Prison, 
it has been also used aa a place of confinement for 
those who were formerly imprisoned there. Ih 
Horsemonger Lane, leading from BUu^man Street, 
is the Surrey County Gaol, a massive biiildinf^ of 
brick, surrounded by a lofty wall. An erection at 
the top of the northern lodge is used as the plaoe 
of execution. Adjoining it is the seasionfi-houae. 

ST. GEORGE'S FIELDS, &0. 

In the Borough Bead standa the British and 
Foreign School Society, a fine institution, estab- 
lished for the education of the children of membera 
of Dissenting congregations. 

Trinity Qiurch, Newington Butts, is a- spadoun 
and cruciform edi^ce, erected in 1823, from de- 
signs by Mr. Bedford; it is ornamented with a 
portico, consisting of six fluted Corinthian columns, 
above which is a square belfry, surmounted by 
an octagonal tower. There is a statue of King 
Alfred in front of the church. St. Mary's, New- 
ington Butts, was the burial-phioe of the learned 
Bishop Horsley. 

In St. George's Fields, in the parish of Lambeth, 
stands Bethlehem Hospital, comm<mly known as 
Bedlam. It derived its name from having origi- 
nally been the hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem, 
and was incorporated by Uenry YIII. for the re- 
ception of lunatics. The ancient hospital, erected 
in 1675, on the east of Moorfields, was palled 
down in 1814. The present edifice was com- 
menced in 1812, and completed in 1815, from de- 
signs by Mr. Lewis, at a coat of about £100,000 : 
a portion of it occupies the site of the fJEunous Dog 
and Duck Tavern. It has a magnificent iaQade, 
consisting of a centre and two wings, the centre 
being surmounted by a dome, and ornamented 
with an Ionic portico of six columns, above which 
are the arms of Great Britain. The length oi the 
facade alone is 580 feet, and the edifice is three 
stories high : new buildings have also been re- 
cently added, which will accommodate 166 patients, 
in addition to the 200, for whom there is room in 
the body of the building. 

Opposite to this hospital tliere has recently been 
erected a fine cathedral for the Bomaa Catholics : 
it is a noble edifice, handsomely fitted up in Uie 
Interior, but the tower is as yet incomplete. 

Near this there is a school for the Indigent 
Blind. It is^ fine building, with a handsome 
Gothic screen. The institution, which commenced 
about the year 1799, was established to instruct 
the indigent blind in trades, by which they might 
wholly, or in part, gain their own subsistence, 
and in this object it has been eBuaently suocessfuL 




On the other .side of the Komim Catholic Cathe- 
iitl stands the Asylaro, or hooae of refuge, for 
female orphan children. This edifice was rebuilt 
in 1825i And now forms threa sides of a quadrangle, 
with a neat chapel in the centre, in which coUeo- 
tions are made for the children every Sonday, 
This Qsefnl institution owes its origin ohiefiy to 
the recommendation of Sir John Fielding. 

Near the Walworth Road are the Surrey Zoolo- 
gical Gardens, which originated in the animals 
that wece remored here on the demolition of Ese^ 
ter Change. The gardens are beaatifqily laid outr 
ftnd contain a largo piece of water, a handsome 
sospeaaion bndge, and elegantly con3tnicted 
bouses of different fonos, in which the animals 
are lodged. Eveiy summer there is a large paint- 
lag exhibited, being a view of soma town or cele- 
brated place; during the eveningf singing and 
dancing take place, and the whole entertaihmeut 
ceaclndes with a grand display of fireworks. 

BLAGSnUABS BOAD, SbO. 

At the Boathem extremity of the BlackfHars 
Bridge R{>ad stands an obelisk, indicating the Junc- 
tion of the roads from the bridges of Westminster, 
Waterloo, London, and Blackfriars. At a short 
distance is the Surrey Theatre, which, when first 
built, was appropriated to eq^nestrian performances, 
hot afier being burnt down in 1805, it was rebuilt 
in an extremely conunodious and elegant manner. 

Beyond it is the Magdalene, a most beneficial 
institation, established in 1758, chiefly by the 
exertions of the unfortunate Dr. Dodd, with the 
object of reclaiming abandoned females from pro- 
ifitution. Since its institution, it has been the 
means of restoring upwards of 5,000 unfortunate 
women to their fomilies and friends, as eveiy 
female whose conduct has been satisfactory, is 
pronded for before leaving the house. There is 
acoommodation here for 80 females in the building, 
which also contidns a chapel open to the public 
on a Sunday, when a collection is made on entrance. 
Those persons who wish to benefit by the institu- 
tion, apply on the first Thursday of every month, 
when a certain number are admitted without re- 
commendation. 

•WAXEmJOO BOAD, AO. 

The Blackfriars' Road is connected, by Stamford 
Street, with the Waterloo Bridge Road, in which 
stands die Church of St. John the Evangelist, 
erected in 1823, from designs by Mr. Bedford. It 
is a large edifice of brick and stone, surmounted 
by a handsome steeple, and ornamented with a 
PortioQ, consisting of six Doric columns. Kear the 
bridge there is a shot manufactory, known as one 
of the marks in Loudon, which has a tower nearly 
100 feet in height 

TheYlctoria Theatie, also in this Road, was 
erected in 1816, the first stone having ^en laid 
by Alderman Goodbehere, as proxy for the Prince 
and Princess of Saxe Coburg. It is of an oblong 
form, and has an extensive stage. The perform^ 
anees consist of melodramas, farces, and burlettas. 

This road is connected with the Hungerford 

Suspension Bridge and the Westminster Bridge 

Bead by the York Road, in which is situated 

a handsome building, erected in 1828, for the 
▼ox* m. 



General Lying-in-Hospital, an institution which 
was established in 1765, for the wives of poor 
tradesmen and mechajiics. 

WESTMINSTER ROAD, &C. 

Astley's Royal Amphitheatre, in the Westmin- 
ster Road, was first established in 1767 as a riding- 
school, but was afterwards formed into a theatre 
for equestrian performances. It was burnt down 
in 1794, and again in 1803, when it was rebuilt, 
and became the property of the famous Ducrow. 
It was, however, again destroyed by fire in 1841, 
but was immediately rebuilt in a more handsome 
and commodious style. It is now the property of 
Mr. Batty, and is entirely appropriated to eques- 
trian performances, melodramas, and pantomimes, 
in which the first feats in the world have been 
exhibited. 

O0M3CBSOB OF TBK WSTBOPOUS. 

The chief circumstance which has raised Eng- 
land to her present important position in the worlds 
is her vast trade and commerce, of which London 
possesses a very considerable share. It was at a 
very early period that London commenced to be 
of commercial importance, for Tacitus speaks of it 
as the nohUe emponum of his time. Bede calls it 
an emporium for many nations repairing toUhy land 
and sea. Fitz-Stephen, in the reign of Henry XL. 
says that no city in the world exports its merckandisi 
to such a distance as London* Edward I., in 1296^ 
first incorporated the Company of Merchant Ad- 
venturers, and the privileges of the Ilanse Mer* 
chants were much extended about the same period. 
In 1504 these privileges were confirmed by statute, 
and all previous acts against them were repealed. 

A company was soon after formed for the pur- 
pose of prosecuting discoveries under the direction 
of Sebastian Cabot, a Bristol merchant ; and one of 
the ships belonging to this company having acci- 
dentally arrived at the bay of St. Nicholas, landed 
at Archangel, and obtained peculiar privileges of 
trade from the Czar of Russia. Mary incorporated 
these Russia or Muscovy merchants, and their 
charter was confirmed in the eighth year of Eliza- 
beth's reign. This queen also obtained for the 
English the exclusive grant of the foreign cosv 
merce of that vast empire. It was not, indeed, 
until this period that England began to derive any 
benefit from her own commercial advantages. 
Settlements were then planned in America, par- 
ticularly in Virginia, Discoveries were every day 
being made of new countries, shipping increased, 
and for the first time the sea was considered the 
wealthy element of prosperity, and naval dominion 
was looked upon as the most desirable thing that 
the nation could attain. Multitudes now flocked 
to London from Flanders, in consequence of the dis- 
turbances in that country, bringing with them 
their families and their wealth. The Royal Ex- 
change was now erected by Sir Thomas Grcsham. 
The Levant or Turkey Company, and also the 
Eastland Company, were established in 1579 ; and 
on the 3l8t December, 1600, Elizabeth gralited 
the first patent to the East India Company. Their 
first adventure was successful, and they have now 
risen to be one of the greatest mercantile assoeia- 
tions in the world. 





LON 



98 



LON 



The society of Spanish Mercliants was incorpo- 
rated, and assurance and insurance companies 
were established. At that time we were provided 
with ail metals from Germany ; wine, paper, linen, 
&c., were furnished from France; sugars from 
Portugal ; all kinds of American produce came 
from Spain, and East India commodities from 
Venetia and Genoa. Charters were then granted 
to corporations or bodies of men, giving them an 
exclusive right of trading to various parts ; such as 
the Hudson's Bay Company, the Turkey Company, 
the Royal African Company, &c., most of which 
countries are now laid open, and the patents 
granted by Elizabeth annulled. 

Under James I. the foreign trade greatly in- 
creased, and the tonnage and number of ships in 
the port of London was considerably augmented. 
Rapid progress was also made during the com- 
mencement of the reig^ of Charles I., as may be 
estimated by the amount of ship-money imposed on 
the capital by that monarch, which amounted to 
£14,000, that being the cost of two ships of 1,120 
tons, and 448 men. 

Prices current now began to be issued, and in 
1635 an order was issued by the king in council to 
the postmaster of England for foreign parts^ requir- 
ing him to open a communication between the 
metropolis and Edinburgh, Dublin, and other 
places. Hitherto merchants had been accustomed 
to deposit their money in the Tower mint, but in 
1640 the king thought proper to raise a sum of 
money by a forced loan, and thus the deposit lost 
its credit, and the merchants were forced to trust 
their money to their apprentices and clerks. Rob- 
beries were frequent, and it was necessary to find 
a remedy. Merchants then lodged their money in 
the hands of the goldsmiths, whom they commis- 
sioned to receive and pay for them ; and this was 
the origin of the practice of banking, for gold- 
smiths soon allowed a regular interest for the 
money deposited with them, and in a short time 
commenced to discount merchants' bills, at an 
interest superior to that which they paid. 

The celebrated navigation act was passed in 
1651 ; and in the same year coffee was introduced 
to London by one Edwards, a Turkey merchant. 
The sugar trade then also became established, and 
upwards of 20,000 cloths were sent annually to 
Turkey. During the three years subsequent to 
1665, when the Great Plague was raging, scarcely 
a foreign vessel entered the port of London, and 
the Great Fire, which soon after happened, was a 
serious check upon commercial enterprise. Trade, 
however, shortly revived, and in the course of a 
few years was in as prosperous a condition as ever. 

In 1670, India muslins were first worn, and the 
Hudson's Bay Company was then established. 
The Greenland Fishing Company was incorporated 
in 1693, and the following year was memorable 
for the institution of the Bank of England. The 
commerce of the East Indies having increased con- 
siderably, a new joint stock company was estab- 
lished in 1698, but it was shortly afterwards in- 
corporated with the old one by Queen Anne, under 
the title of *^ The United Company of Merchants 
trading to the East Indies." 

Commerce now increased with great rapidity, until 
1710, from which time, however, until 1748, it made 



comparatively slow progress, owing to the South Sea 
scheme, the Scotch rebellion, and the Spanish war. It 
began again to flourish, but met with a new check 
by the breaking out of the American war, but after 
the peace it revived and rapidly increased ; for in 
1784 the exportation to America alone amounted 
to £3,397,500, much more than it had been for 
many years before the war. The amount of duties 
levied in the port of London was then £4,472,091. 
In 1796 the exports of London amounted in value 
to £18,410,499, and the importo to £14,719,466. 
The number of British ships that entered the port 
was 2,007, carrying 436,843 tons; and 2,169 
foreign vessels, carrying 287,142 tons. The fol- 
lowing year was remarkable for a panic which took 
place when the Bank discontinued payment in 
specie, but confidence was soon restored. In 1799 
the revenue of the customs amounted to £7,226,353, 
an astonishing increase upon the amount they pro- 
duced when Queen Elizabeth commenced her 
government, at which time they amounted to only 
£36,000. 

The value of the imports and of tbe exports of 
the port, in 1800, amounted to £68,000,000, nearly 
two- thirds of the trade of the whole kingdom; 
2,666 vessels belonged to the port in that year, 
carrying 568,268 tons, and 41,402 men, showing 
an increase on the beg^ning of the last century of 
six to one on th# tonnage, and four to one on the 
amount of men and ships. The value of the im- 
ports and exports of London, in 1829, had increased 
to £107,772,805. In 1837, the number of ves- 
sels that entered the port was 17,603, carrying 
3,132,367 tons, and the number that cleared out- 
wards was 14,654, carrying 2,495,517 tons; this 
is exclusive of vessels in ballast, and those in the 
Irish and English trade, of which there were 9,820 
inwards, and 14,725 outwards. In 1839, the 
amount of customs duty received at the port of 
London wa^ £11,431,245, being nearly three times 
the amount of that produced at Liverpool, and 
eleven times that produced at Bristol. 

Since the beginning of the century, several 
changes have taken place in the commercial inter- 
course of England : the slave trade has been abol- 
ished ; the trade with the East Indies and China 
thrown open ; the colonies of South Australia and 
New Zealand established ; facilities of intercourse 
afforded to all parts of the globe by steam ; the 
overland route to India discovered ; and the navi- 
gation laws repealed. 

THB FORT OF LONDOK. 

The port, meaning that part occupied by ship- 
ping, extends from London Bridge to Deptfoid, a 
distance of about four miles, the average Inreadth 
being from four \o five hundred yards. It may be 
divided into four parts — ^the upper, middle, and 
lower Pools, and the space between limehouse and 
Deptford. The upper Pool extends from London 
Bridge to Union Hole, a distance of about 1,600 
yards ; the middle Pool from thence to Wapping 
New Stairs, 700 yards ; the lower Pool from thence 
to the Horseferry-tier, near Limehouse, 1,800 
yards ; and the space below to Deptford is about 
2,700 yards. The legal quays, which were ap- 
pointed in 1558, and the siifferance quays, occupy 
the whole of the north bank of the river, with little 




mterraption, firom London Bridge to the western 
extremity of Tower ditch, forming a frontage of 
About 1,464 feet. 

This however, being quite insufficient for the 
purposes of aooommodation for the commerce of 
London, a ph&n was projected in 1793 for the con- 
ttroction <^ wet docks in Wapping, in the Lile of 
Dogs, and at Rotherhithe. Mr. Daniel Alexander, 
by direction of a committee, accordingly made a 
lurey, and prepared plans and estimates for form- 
ing docks at Wapping, and a canal leading from 
that part of Blackwall where the present East 
India docks have been constracted, and along a 
line where the West India docks have been formed. 
A meeting of merchants took place on December 
22, 1795, when the plans met with unanimous ap- 
proval ; and within a few hours a subscription of 
£800,000 was filled up for carrying them into exe- 
cution, and the preparations for their construction 
were commenced. 

The West India Docks are situated across the 
Isle of Dogs, at a part where it is extremely nar- 
row; and as the isle is formed by the circuitous 
course of the river, which leaves it almost a penin- 
sula, the docks communicate on one side with 
Blackwall, and on the other side with Limehouse. 
Theae docks were constructed by the subscriptions 
of private persons, who are repaid with interest not 
to exceed 10 per cent. This is produced by a rate 
or charge upon all the shipping and merchandise 
which euters the dock, and the dividend has always 
hitherto been paid by the Company. In 1799 an 
act was passed, by which all West India produce 
was required to be unloaded in these docks : the 
pitsent capital of the Company is £1,100,000. 
There are two docks — the northern one, which 
extends over thirty acres, is appropriated to the 
onloading of the ships from the West Indies, and 
baa accommodation for 300 West Indiamen ; and 
the aouthem one, which covers twenty-four acres, 
and contains accommodation for upwards of 200 [ 
West Indiamen, is appropriated to the loading of 
outward-bound ships. Both these docks are en- 
closed by walls five feet in thickness, and are sur- 
rounded by extensive and commodious warehouses. 
The first dock was commenced in February, 1800, 
and completed in August, 1802 ; it is surrounded 
by extensive warehouses, in which the goods are 
lodged until the duty is paid ; the second dock was 
opooed in 1805. A canal was cut to the south 
of the West India Docks, to enable ships to avoid 
the drcnitous navigation of the Isle of Dogs, but 
was sold to the DodL Company by the city in 1829. 

The London Docks, between Batcliffe highway 
and the Thames, were constructed by subscription 
in the same maimer as the West India Docks. 
They were conunenced in June, 1802, and in 1805 
St George's Dock was opened; this dock extends 
over twenty acres, and has accommodation for 500 
veaaels; adjoining it is a basin for the reception of 
small craft. To the east of this dock, and com- 
municating with it, there is another dock of four- 
teen acres. These docks are also surrounded by 
large warehouses. The Company have a capital 
of £2,200,000: their docks are used for the gene- 
ral traffic of the port; their tobacco warehouse 
akme covers four acres, and they receive £15,600 
per annum from the government as rent for it. 



The business is under the direction of twenty-four 
directors elected from the proprietors, together 
with the Lord Mayor of London for the time being. 

The West India Docks having proved so advan- 
tageous, the proprietors of East India shipping in 
1803 succeeded in carrying a bill through parlia- 
ment for the construction of docks for the better 
security and accommodation of the EUist India 
vessels. A subscription was opened, and £300,000 
having been contributed, the directors purchased 
the Brunswick Dock at Blackwall, which had beei^ 
constructed by Mr. Perry out of his own fortune. 
This dock was appropriated to the loading of out- 
ward-bound shipping, and a larger dock of eighteen 
acres was opened in 1806, for the purpose of un- 
loading the homeward-bound ships ; it has a com- 
modious basin, with embrasures attached to it. All 
East India produce coming to this port must be 
unloaded in these docks. The management is 
carried on by thirteen directors of the East India 
Company. 

The St Catherine's Docks are situated on the 
site of St. Catherine's Hospital, between the Lon- 
don Docks and' the Tower. The money for their 
construction was raised by shares, and the expense, 
including the purchase of 1,250 houses, which 
were cleared away, amounted to £2,000,000. They 
were commenced in 1827, and completed by Octo- 
ber, 1828 ; the designs were by Mr. Telford, and 
the builder was Mr. Hardwicke. They comprise 
an area of twenty-four acres, of which eleven and 
a half are devoted to wet docks, and the remainder 
to the warehouses and quays. There is a canal 
conmiunicating with the river, 190 feet in length, 
and 45 in width, which can be filled or emptied by 
means of a steam-engine of 100 horse power, so 
that vessels of 700 tons may be carried into the 
docks at any time of the tide. These docks are 
also enclosed with walls. 

As it was desiral)le to form an easy communica- 
tion between these newly-constructed docks and 
the city of London, the Commercial Road was 
constructed for that purpose. It is 70 feet wide, 
and has in the centre a strong pavement 20 feet 
in width ; thirteen trustees have the management 
of it, and they were empowered to raise £120,000 
for its construction. The distance from the Koyal 
Exchange in London to the West India Dock gate 
is three miles, and to the East India Dock gate 
three mUes and a half. The Pool is that portion 
of the Thames in which colliers are permitted to 
anchor, and extends from the custom-house to Bo- 
tany Baytier, near the Regent's Canal, and about 
190 or 200 vessels are generally moored in it. The 
vessels are consigned to factors, by whom the pro- 
duce is sold to the merchants, the expense of the 
meterage, 3d. per ton, being shared between them. 

The Bermondsey Collier Dock was constructed 
in order to relieve the river from an obstruction to 
navigation, formed hy the number of small craft 
formerly moored along its banks. The metro- 
polis is connected with the inland parts of the 
country by means of the following canals : — The 
Paddington Canal, which was opened in 1800, leads 
from Paddington, and joins the Grand Junction 
Canal; from Paddington it extends nearly 100 
miles, to the Oxford Canal at Branston, in North- 
amptonshire, by which it is connected with other 



Csnals, and forms a line of cotnmQnicatioti to Lan- 
cashire and Yorkshire ; another branch of it falls 
Into the Thames at Brentford. The Regent's 
Canal was opened in August, 1820, and connects 
the Paddington Grand Junction with the Thames 
on the east of the city, passing the northern sub- 
turhS) and haying wharres, &c., at Paddington, 
dattle Bridge, the City Koad, and other places. 
It branches from the Qrand Junction at Padding- 
Ion, and passing under Maida Hill, runs through 
^e Regent's Park and St. Pancras to Islington, 
where it flows through a tunnel about three quar- 
ters of a mile long, beneath the bed of the New 
Rirer, to the City Road, and proceeds by Hackney 
and Mile^nd to Limehouse. This canal is nine 
miles long, and has 12 locks and 37 bridges ; it 
was executed under the superintendence of Mr. 
Kash. On the Surrey side of the riyer is the 
(}rand Surrey Canal, which passes through the 
south-eastern suburbs from Camberweli, joining 
the Thames at the lower extremity of Rotheihithe. 

TtiE MASUFlCtTJBES OF THB KBTMffPOLtB, 

The manufttctures carried ott in London lure 
varied and extensive, and some of them hav« ex- 
isted from a very early period. The Skinners 
WetQ opulent <^ti£en8 as far baek as 1327, manu- 
facturing Mbles^ luoemtf^ and other richfwn. Cloth- 
working was also carried on to a very considerable 
extent. A manufactory of fine glass was estab- 
lished in Cmtched Friars in 1&56, and at the 
same period the flint-glass manufacture was carried 
dn in the SavK)y. About 1560, an apprentice hav- 
ing seen a pair of knit stockings from Mantua, at 
the house of an Italian, made another pair like 
them, which he presented to William, £4rl of Pem- 
broke, Atad thus was introduced the manufactttre 
df knit fitockings to this country. Soon after- 
wards, Thomas Matthews of Fleet Street c6m- 
menced a mantlikcture of knives, whidi has since 
Nourished here. In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, 
siik stockings Were first introduced. It 1564 
coaches were 0rst made, and within twenty years 
became extensively manufiictured. Soon after, 
the mantifacture of pins, «nd subsequently that of 
needles, was introdnced. Abotrt tiie tenth year of 
die reign of Elisabeth, one Richard Dyer brought 
iVom Spain l^e art of making etiriheh fijtnt^ieeB, 
earthen fire-pdte, and earthen owne, frantporMle. 
Pocket watches having been brought from JHurem- 
bnrg, in Germany, in 1577, that manufacture 
was immediately estsMi&hed. Londote supplied 
not only England, but the whole Continent, with 
saltpetre, in the i^ign of Charles I., by wliioh titee 
there were extensive manufatettites of silk, as well 
as Af varicus articles in silver. In 1676 the print- 
ing of calicoes commenced, and looms were brovight 
fhjm Holland. 

In 1685, numbers of industrious Frenchmen, 
having been driven finom their country by the re- 
vocation of the edict of Nantes, flocked to London, 
Settled in Spitalfields, and introduced several 
manufactures, besides effecting a great improve- 
ment in that of silk. The wholesale trade of Lon- 
don is chiefly carried on in the city and near the 
river, in the spacious warehouses and commo- 
dious counting-houses; while the retail trade is 
scattered through the streets, all of which contain 



hiindsome shops, provided, some w(th the neces- 
saries, and others with the luxuries of life. A 
regular intercourse is kept up between this city 
and all other parts of the island, by means of fall- 
roads, waggons, barges, &c. 



The metropolis is well supplied with prov i sions, 
not only by ^ shops, of which there are numbers 
of all kinds, but the markets, which are Scattered 
about in difiierent parts of the metropolts. 

Smiijifield is the principal market for the Sale of 
bullocks, sheep, lambs, calves, and hogs, which 
takes place every Monday and Friday. The aver- 
age nnmber of oxen sold annually at Smithfield is 
157,750* of sheep and lambs, 1,600,000; of calves, 
21,000; of pigs, 60,000: the value of the whole 
is estimated at £10,000,000. Leadenhall Market, 
and Newgate Market, are the greatest for the sale 
of country-killed meat, and also for pigs and poul- 
try, fresh butter, eggs, &c. Leadenhall Market, 
and the New Market at Bermondsey, are the only 
ones for the sale of skins and leather. The market 
for hay is at Cumberland Market, Regent's Park. 
Farringdon or Fhet Market is for the sale of 
butcher's meatj fruit, and vegetables ; and Covent 
Garden Market is for fruit, flowers, and vegetables. 
Billingsgate is the principal fish market, and was 
the only one until the establishment of Hnngerford 
Market, where fish, butcher's meat, poultry, eggs, 
And butter, frait and vegebaUes, are sold. 

The Com Market, in Mark Lane, is held every 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday ; bat Monday is 
the principal day. The metropolis is supplied 
with hay and straw by markets held at WMte- 
chapd, Smithfield, the New Hayndarket, Psdding- 
ton, and Southwark. 

There are other markets in various parts ef the 
metropolis, soch as Newport Market, for butcher's 
meat; Borough Market, for butcher's meat and 
vegetables ; Borough Haymarket ; Portman Mar- 
ket, Edgeware Road; Hop Market; Clare Mar- 
ket; Clarence Market; Cumberiand Market ; Fltz- 
roy Market; Grosvenor Market ; Hoxton Market; 
James'^s Market; Lumber Court, for fiiAi; Mor- 
timer Market, Tottenham Court Road; Oxfbrd 
Market; Red Lion Market; St. Luke's; St. 
George's Market; ShadweU Market; Spitalfields 
Market, &c. 

In the vicinity of the metropolis there are a 
large number of kitchen gardens, which ate all to- 
gether estimated to extetad over 10,000 acres, the 
average produce of wbich is suppesed to amomit 
annually to about £200 per aicre. Besides these, 
tAiere are fruit gardens, supposed to occupy about 
3,000 acres, whidh famish constant empfoyment 
to abotit 12 persons per ficre, which number is hi- 
creased to about 40 during the fruit season. The 
nursery groonds, which contain every vatwty^ 
ohofiee fruit trees, ornamental Isldrnbs, and flowers 
brought to a higli degree of perfection, occupy 
about 1 ,500 acres ; and yet, with this immense pro- 
vision ibr tise supply, ilfie suburbs 9lte very indif- 
ferently ftitnlshed with fruits and vegetable*. 

VMS MOfrKriFALlTY, Ao. 

The municipal bistory of th^ city of London 
commences frota Che charter gralited by WQIiam 




I. Is MonmialMs ^ th^ Pfmttt privileges of the 
city, BB itaied fai the genenil history of the metro- 
polis. London, in consequence of a yariety of 
charters granted to it by different sovereigns, in 
Older to secure its fidelity m times of distaitiance, 
^ last heoame possessed of a corporation, consist- 
ing of a lord mayor, two sherif!^ for London and 
Middlesex, aldermen, common ootmcilmen, and 
Hvery. On the accession of Wmiam I., the chief 
officer was cidlcd the port-reeve, or port -grave, 
from Saxon words, signifying chief governor of a 
harbour ; he was tlien styHd provost, but under 
Henry II. the Norman title of maire was intro- 
duced, anfl soon Angiified into mayor. 

Edward III., in 1354, granted to the city the 
privikge of having gold or silver maces carried 
before the mayor, sherifib, and aldermen m the 
etty, the suburbs, and liberties throughout Mid- 
dlesex; and also beyond the county, when going 
to meet the king, his heirs, or other royal person- 
ages: the chief magistrate was then first called 
Lofdj and styled Bight Honourable. Heniy III., 
in 1293, granted a charter, allowing a mayor to be 
chosen annually, and continued from year to year, 
if the electors should think proper ; he was, how- 
ever, to be presented to the king for approval; but 
by a new charter, the presentation was permitted 
to be made to the barons of the £xcheN|Uer, to save 
the expense of repairing to wherever the king 
might be. 

The election at first took place in an assembly 
of the oitiaens, at a large meeting called the folk- 
fliofe, but in consequence of the disturbances to 
which this gave rise, delegates were chosen from 
each ward, and called the commonalty. These 
managed the election up to 1475, when an act of 
the commonalty, or oommon council, vested the 
election of the mayor and sheriffy} in the mayor, 
aldermen, and common coundhnen, and in the 
masters, warders, and liveiymeti of the city com- 
panies. This mode of election was afterwards 
confirmed by act of parliament, and still contitines. 

The supremacy of the lord mayor does not cease 
on the death of the sovcreigti, but on such an 
occasiou he is considered the principal Officer in 
the kingdom, and so takes his place in the privy 
council until the proclamation of the new king. 
The lord mayor is the representative of the king 
in the civil government of the city; he is also first 
commissioner of the lieutenancy, perpetual coroner 
and escheator within the city and liberties of Lon- 
Hion and the borough of Soutnwark, chief justice of 
oyer and terminer and gaol delivery of Newgate, 
judge of the court of wardmote at the election of 
sldermeu, conservator of the rivers Thames and 
Medway, perpetual commissioner in all affan*s re- 
lating to the river Lea, and chief butler to the 
king at all coronations, having Tor that service a 
fee of a golden cup and cover, and a golden ewer. 
His sanction is necessary for the validity of all 
corporation business. The election takes place on 
the 29th September, when the livery in Guildhall 
choose two of the senior aldermen below the bar, 
and present them to the court of mayor and alder- 
men, who select one of the aldcnnen, who is then 
declared lord mayor elect. He enters office on the 
^th of November, on which day the aldermen and 
sheriifk attend him to Guildhall in their coaches. 



from whence they proceed about noon to London 
Bridge, where the lord mayor elect, the aldermen, 
recorder, and sheriffs, embark on the magnifioent 
city barge, and, followed by the city companies in 
their several barges, proceed in state to West- 
minster, where certain ceremonies are gone 
through, and his lordship takes the prescribed 
oaths before the barons of the Exchequer. He 
then proceeds to the other courts of law, invites 
the judges to dinner, and returns by water to 
Blackfiriars Bridge. His lordship then goes in 
procession to the Guildhall, where the day con- 
cludes with a magnificent entertainment, followed 
by a grand ball, at which all the principal person- 
ages in the kingdom are present. The costume of 
the lord mayor is very costly. Tlie salary of the 
office fs £8,000, but the expenditure frequently 
exceeds that sum by several tfiou sands. 

The office of alderman is of Saxon institution, 
and the name itself is derived from the Saxon 
ectlchr-manj a man advanced in years. Henry III. 
appointed twenty-four citizens to exercise the 
power, and in the reign of his son the city was 
divided into twenty-four wards: the aldermen 
were annually elected till 1394, but Richard II. 
having removed the courts of judicature from Yoik 
to London, it was enacted that they should con- 
tinue to hold office during Kfe or pood behaviour. 
There are now twenty*«ix wards, each of which 
has its alderman : they are elected by tliose free^ 
men who are resident householders; the lord 
mayor presides at the election, which, if a poll be 
demanded, lasts for three days : those who have 
filled the ofSt^e of mayor are justices of the ijuorum, 
and the others are justices of the peace within the 
dty. The names of the wards, with the number 
of common councilmen returned by each, are as 
follow : — 



Aldoragate, 8 

Aldg»te, 6 

Billingsgate, 10 

Blshopgate, 14 

Bread Strest^..***...^ IS 

Bridge, 15 

Broad Street, 10 

Candlewick,....^^ 6 

Castlo Baynai-d, 10 

Chejip, ^ 12 

Coleiaan Street, 6 

Oovd'wiiitieiv, »..».«*. <»»»»««.. . 8 



Cornhni, 6 

Oripplegate, 16 

Bowgata, r.....*^ 6 

Farringdon-withln, 17 

Farrliigdon-witboat, 16 

Iiaagboniiia,..M*..MM..........ld 

Lime Street, 4 

Portnoken 5 

QQMBlitUief....M 6 

Tower, 12 

Vlntry, * ..». 9 

Walbrook, 6 



Bridge- Ward-Without is unrepresented, except 
by an alderman. 

The common cotmcil is a modification of the 
ancient commonalty which arose from the inoon- 
venience attending ihe fothmotesj or general assem- 
blies of the citizens, which took place in 8t. Paul's 
Churchyard, and which, until the reign of Henry 
III., was the supreme assembly of the cSty. At 
first two representatives were sent from each ward, 
but, in 1347, the number was enlarged, and each 
of the twenty-five wards now sends representatives 
according to its extent. 

The name of sheriff is derived tntn $hire-Teev&, 
the governor of a shire t)r county, and the office 
was in existence previous to the accession of Wil- 
liam I. in general cases, the sheriffs are the offi- 
cers of the king; but the corporation having pur- 
chased the perpetual sheriffwick of Middlesex from 
Henry I., the lord mayor and citizens now hold it 
in fee, and appoint two sherifi^ annually for Lon- 




don and Middlesex. The jarisdiction of the sherifEii 
iSf in many instances, separate, although, if either 
die, the other cannot act till a new one he chosen, 
as there must he two sheriffs for London, which is 
a city and a county, and they make but one con- 
jointly for Middlesex. They were formerly chosen 
from the commonalty, but any citizen is eligible, 
except he swear himself not worth i^l 5,000. The 
present mode of election is for the lord mayor to 
drink to fourteen respectable citizens, two of whom 
are chosen by the livery on the following Mid- 
summer-day, and they are obliged to serve under 
a penalty of £400 ; and whoever serves must give 
bond to the corporation for £1,000. The sheriffs 
enter upon office on Michaelmas-day, having been 
sworn at Guildhall the day previously. The day 
after Michaelmas-day, the sheriffs proceed to 
Westminster, to be presented to the baxons of the 
Exchequer, and to go through certain ceremonies. 
The duty of the'sheriffs is to serve writs of process, 
and, when the king is party, they may break open 
doors or untile roofs to gain admission into houses, 
but upon private process they can only enter when 
the door is open, or by stratagem. The sheriffs like- 
wise attend the judges, and execute their orders ; 
impanel juries ; see condemned persons executed ; 
and, in cases of riot, rebellion, &c., raise the posse 
comitatusj or whole body of inhabitants. About 
25,000 writs are annuaUy directed to the sheriffs 
for the county alone. 

The recorder is appointed for life by the lord 
mayor and aldermen, and has a salary of £3,000 
per annum. The chamberlain, common-sergeant, 
city-remembrancer, &c., are also officers belonging 
to the city. 

The name of livery is derived from the ancient 
usage of the retainers and followers of the lord 
mayor and sheriffs, wearing dresses of the same 
form and colour as worn by those officers. The 
wardens of the companies, in former times, deli- 
vered to the lord mayor, on the 1st of December, 
a purse containing 208., to obtain, for those who 
wished it, sufficient cloth to make ihem a suit 

PECULIAB FRIVILEOES OF THE CrTT. 

The city possesses several valuable privileges, 
one of the most important of which is the judicial 
franchise. There are the lord mayor's court, the 
court of hustings, the sheriff's court, &c. 

Attached to the city, there are ninety -one 
giulds or companies, of which the following twelve 
are the principal ; the chief officers of them are 
sometimes styled right honourable : — ^the Mercers, 
Grocers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Goldsmiths, Skin- 
ners, Merchant Tailors, Haberdashers, Salters, Iron- 
mongers, Vintners, and Clothworkers. About fifty 
of these companies have halls in different parts of 
London, the most remarkable of which will be 
found in the general description of the public 
buildhigs of the metropolis. 

Another Important privilege of the city is its 
military government. According to the act of 
1794, it has two regiments of militia, raised by 
ballot, and a regiment of light horse volunteers. 
The city of London returns four members to par- 
liament, who are elected by the liverymen, and, 
under a recent act, the £10 householders. The 



nomination takes place at GuildliaUf and, when a 
poll is demanded, it eontinues for one day. 

METROPOLrrAK B0R0UOH8. 

The seven parliamentary boroughs into which 
the metropolis is divided, are those of London, 
Southwark, Lambeth, Westminster, Maiylebone, 
Finsbury, and Tower-hamlets ; to which may also 
be added Greenwich, including Woolwich and 
Deptford, each of which returns two members to 
parliament. 

WX8TMIK8TEB. 

Westminster was anciently known as Thomey 
Island, because, says Stow, it was a place overgrown 
vnih thorns, and environed with waters, and was for 
several centuries situated at a considerable dis- 
tance from London, the only communication being 
by a road running along the site of the Strand. 
In 1385, it was paved as far as the Savoy, and the 
pavement was afterwards continued as £Gur as Ivy 
Bridge by Sir Robert Cecil. There is not much 
doubt that there was a bridge across the Thames 
in 994. The royal palace that stood hero was 
founded by Edward the Confessor; but the origin 
of the city of Westminster may be derived from 
the foundation of the Abbey, to which, in 1257, 
Henry III. granted the privilege of a market and 
fair. 

In 1352, Westminster, by act of parliament, 
was constituted one of the ten towns in England 
where the wool-staple or market should perpetually 
be held. At the dissolution, Westminster was 
converted into a bishopric, and had a dean and 
twelve prebendaries; but on the translation of 
Thomas Thirlby, who was the only bishop, to Nor- 
wich, the bishopric was suppressed. 

After this time, Westminster continued to in- 
crease, in consequence of being the seat of the 
court and the legislature. The city is comprised 
in the parishes of St. Margaret and St. John, and 
the libei*tics consist of seven parishes — St. Mar- 
tin's-in-the-Fields, St James's, St Anne's, St 
Gement Danes, St. Mary-le-Strand, St George's. 
Hanover Square, and St. Paul's, Covent Gai^en, 
with the precinct of the Savoy. St Martin's-le- 
Grand is also a part of the liberties of Westminster, 
although situated in London. A college anciently 
stood there, consisting of a dean and priests, the 
advowson of which was conveyed by Henry VII. 
to the Abbey of Westminster. Henry VIII. 
granted it to the see which he had created, and 
afterwards to the dean and chapter. When Ed- 
ward VI. dissolved the bishopric, he granted St. 
Martin's-le-Grand, with the jurisdiction, to the 
Bishop of London ; but it was afterwards restored, 
by act of parliament, to the dean and chapter, who 
still continue in possession of it The church was 
destroyed soon after 1548. The inhabitant house- 
holders of St. Martin's-le-Grand have the right of 
voting for the members for Westminster. 

The government of Westminster was in tbe 
hands of the abbot and monks until the Beforma- 
tion, after which it was vested in the bishop and 
the dean and chapter; but at length it was finally 
settled, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, by the 
government being given to the laity, reserving to 
the dean the right of nominating the chief officers. 




Tbe jonsdiction extends to some towns in Essex. 
The chief o£Scer is the high-steward, who gener- 
ally holds office for life ; he is chosen by the dean 
sod chapter, and is nsoally a nobleman. The 
next officer is the high-bailiff, who is nominated 
hy the high-steward, and has to pay a considerable 
Bum for his appointment. This office is also held 
for life, and to it belongs the management of the 
election of members of parliament : idl other bailiff's 
are sabordinate to this officer; he sommons jories, 
and to him belong all fines and forfeitures. Be- , 
sides these, there are sixteen burgesses and their 
assistants, whose functions are the same as those 
of the aldermen's deputies in the city, each one 
being placed at the head of a ward. From these 
are choflen two head burgesses — one for the city, 
and one for the liberties. There is also a high- 
constable, chosen by a oourt-leet, who has all the 
other constables under him. 

Westminster returns two members to parlia- 
ment, the election taking place before St. Paul's 
choich, in Covent Grarden ; if a poll is demanded, 
the election continues two days, exclusive of the 
day of nomination. - Under the Beform Bill, two 
members each are returned for Marylebone and 
Lambeth, each of which hare separate poUing- 
places. 

SOUTHWAKK. 

The borough of Southwark possessed a distinct 
goremment, being under its own bailiff^, until 
the year 1327, when great inconyenience being 
finmd to arise from malefactors escaping thither to 
be out of the jurisdiction of the city magistrates, 
a gmt was made of the town, and the mayor of 
London was made bailiff of Southwark, and em- 
powered to govern it by a deputy. Under B^ward 
VL the dty purchased the borough or town of 
Southwark from the crown, and one month after- 
wards, for a fkirther sum of money, Southwark was 
constituted a ward, by the title of Bridge- Ward- 
Without. The government is thus vest^ in the 
M mayor, who has under him a steward and 
bailiff, the former of whom holds a court of record, 
at St Margaret's Hill, every Monday, for all debts, 
damages, and trespasses, within his limits. This 
borough returns two members to parliament, whose 
election takes place in front of the Town-hall; 
sad, if a poll be demanded, continues for two days. 

GITT POLIOE. 

The city of London is now watched by police 
ooDBtables, reg^ulated in the same manner as the 
Metropolitan police, from whom they are distin- 
goishod by having arms of the city embroidered 
upon their coat collars. There are two police-offices 
in the city—one in the Mansion House, where the 
lord mayor presides, and to which all cases that 
oocur east of King Street are taken; and the other 
at the Ouildhall, presided over by one of the alder- 
men in rotation, and to which all cases occurring 
west of King Street are taken. There are also 
police-offices in Bow Street, Great Marlborough 
Street, Lower Pentonville, Worship Street, Shore- 
ditch, Lambeth Street, Whitechapel, High Street, 
Marylebone, Queen Square, Westminster, and 
Union Street, Southwark. There is also the 
Thames Police-office, Wapping, to which are taken 



all cases from the river, which is guarded by a re- 
gular police, who keep watch both by day and 
night. The magistrates in these offices dispose of 
many of the cases in a summary way, and their 
duty also extends to persons brought up for exa- 
mination on charges of treason, murder, and every 
kind of felony, fraud, and misdemeanour. Each 
of the offices has two magistrates, who attend by 
rotation, two clerks and other officers, and from ten 
to twelve constables. The three principal stations 
of the Thames police are at Somerset House, Wap- 
ping, and Blackwall, but boats are plying between 
these stations the whole night. The principal 
police-office is that of Bow Street. 

THE LOmOOV PBESB. 

In the metropolis there are published a large 
number of periodicals, adapted for all classes of 
society. Some of these appear quarterly, some 
monthly, others weekly, and are sold at various 
prices, from one penny upwards. To enumerate 
even the principal of them would be impossible, 
and no statement would long continue accurate, as 
there are new ones springing up, and others being 
put a stop to every day. 

Besides these publications, there are numbers of 
newspapers published daily, some in the morning, 
some in the evening; some are published weekly, 
and others two or three times a week. The 
first newspaper published in England appeared 
in 1558, and was called The EnglUh Mercuries 
it was sent out at the time the Spanish Armada 
was approaching our country. It was not till 
after the Revolution of 1688 that the Freedom of 
the Press was established, by the refusal of the 
parliament to continue the restrictions that had 
before been imposed upon it. The stamp duties 
upon advertisements in newspapers were lowered 
in 1833 from 3s. 6d. to Is. 6d., and in 1837 the 
paper stamp was reduced from 4d. to Id. The 
number of stamps used in one year is upwards of 
30,000,000. The number of copies of morning 
journals daily circulated is about 33,000, of even- 
ing Journals about 14,000, and of weekly newspa- 
pers more than 150,000. The number of copies of 
newspapers weekly printed in Great Britain is 
from 54 to 65,000,000. To speak here of the con- 
summate ability with which the papers are con- 
ducted, would be nothing less than sheer imper- 
tinence, and it may therefore suffice to say, that 
they exhibit the greatest combination of intellect 
aud mechanical appliance that has ever been exhi- 
bited, and that the great men who, through their 
columns, give the tone to that mighty agent^ f ublic 
opinion, reflect in the most lucid characfiw the 
history of their age. 

CHABITABU5 III8TITUT10SS, &C 

Besides the charitable institutions mentioned in 
the course of the foregoing description, London 
contains several other hospitals, educational chari- 
ties, asylums, dispensaries, &c. ; and it is calcu- 
lated that the annual sum expended in public 
charities in this city amounts to upwards of 
£1,000,000. Foremost among these institutions, 
as providing for the highest requisite of humanity, 
mental instruction, is the London University. 
i This important institution was incorporated in 




1837rWith a chaacellor, vice-chancellor, and 36 
fellows, empowered to. confer degrees in arts, 
law, and medicine. It is chiefly supported hy 
goyernmcnt grants. Grovemment has granted 
to the following institutions the privilege of 
sending students to this university to graduate: 
the same privilege has been granted to other 
colleges situated in different parts of the empire. 
Those to which the privilege has already been 
granted, or which have applied for it, besidea 
the two metropolitan ones, are Bristol GoUega; 
Oscot, Stonyhurat, and Ushaw colleges (Eoman. 
Catholic) ; Durham university ; St. Cuthbert's colr- 
lege, near Durham ; Manchester college (formerly 
York, Unitarian) ; and Homerton college, High- 
bury college, and Spring Hill eoUege, Birmingham, 
connected with the Congpregationalists» From the 
last three colleges not less than 9 students went 
up to the matriculation, in October, IS'iO. Of the 
above colleges. University college, Liondon, appears 
to take the lead. The estimated expense of con- 
ducting the university for the year ending 31st 
March, 1841, was £6,723. 10s. 

University College. — This educational establish- 
ment was. founded by subscription in 1825; it has 
since received various endowments. The edifice is 
situated in the northern environs ; it is classical 
and elegant. There are well-arranged lecture and 
apparatus rooms, a spacious library, and an anato- 
mical theatre. Pupils in law, medical studies, 
general science, dassies, and modem languages, 
are received. This institution is chiefly supported 
by donations. 

Kin^a CoUege. — This establishment was founded 
subsequently to the preceding rival institution, and 
in a similar way. It is patronised by the digni- 
taries of the cburch, &c. The edifice adjoins 
Somerset-house, forming one of its wings £rontiug 
the river: it was opened in 1831. The course uf 
edueatiun is similar to that of the preceding, only 
Instruction in the Christian religion, and daily wor- 
ship, are added. 

College of Fhtfeidana. — This college was estab- 
lished in 1523. The college buildings are situated 
in Pall Mall East : they contain a small but neat 
theatre, a library, reading room, &c The college 
is constituted by a president, elects, and fellows, 
who license all physicians to practise within the 
bills of mortality, and grant extra licenses to others 
to practise in the rest of the empire. The fellows 
can only be apppinted from such as have graduated 
at Oxford or Cambridge. 

ColUge of Surgeons. — The Royal College of Sur- 
gecms was originally incorporated with the barbers, 
in 1461, as one of the old city guilds or companies, 
by the name of the Company of Barbprs, then the 
only practitioners in surgery. The surgeons were 
prohibited by Henry VIII. from shaving, and the 
shavers from practising surgery, except in drawing 
teeth. The college buildings are situated in Lin- 
coln's- Inn-Fields, in which is a spacious and elegant 
museum, containing John Hunter's invaluable and 
celebrated preparations. Without the examina- 
tion of this college, no person can practise surgery 
in London or Westminster, or in a circuit of seven 
miles round the haU: they examine medical officers 
Cor the navy and army, and for the East India 
service. 



Veberinary CoUe^e,- — This institutioa was estab- 
lished at Camden-town in 1791. It is wider the 
superintendence of a president and 24 directors, and 
there is a professor who teaehes about 30 pupik 
the principles and practice of farriery, by lecturea^ 
dissections, &c. An infirmary for horses has also 
been established. The buildings ocuaneeted wiih 
this institution are extensive and appropriate. 

8t Feier's CoUege.-^Tha college of St. Peter's, 
Westminster, may here also be notaood, though it 
is little else than a school for boys, and wili aftec- 
wards be enumerated as such, 

JSion College. — This is more particulai'ly a reU* 
gious and charitable than an edncatioiial inslitm- 
tion. It is composed of the clergy of London a« 
fellows, with a president, deans, and assistants^ and 
the bishop of London as visitor, and with alma- 
houses for 10 poor mfin and 10 poor women, en- 
dowed by Dr. Thomas White and others. These 
is also a valuable library for the use of the Btudu>u8 
of the London clergy. The income oC thj» estab- 
lishment, in 1835, was £1,162. 7s. 

sosooL», le. 

The Chartar^honae dcrivea its name ixooa iha 
word ChaHreuse^ being erected upon, the site of a 
convent of Carthusian monks, founded by Sir W. 
Mauny, in the reign of Edward III., and who, on 
the dissolution, were treated with great cruelty by 
Henry VIII. In May, 1611, Mr. Thomas Sutton, 
a merchant of Immense wealth and great liberality, 
purchased these buildings, with their appurten- 
ances, of the Duke of Noifolk, and compcbted them, 
at an expense on the whole of £2O,O0iO. He also 
endowed it with estates to the annual value of 
about £4,500. The buildings are of great anti* 
quity, the chapel containing an organ gallery, 
richly ornamented, several monuments, and the 
tomb of the founder ; there is a library, chiefly pre- 
sented by Mr. Wrayard, and a highly ornamented 
old court room : the governor's room contains por- 
traits of several eminent men ; the hall has a large 
painted window. The institution comprises an 
hospital as well as a school, and its estabJishneni 
consists of a master, a preacher, two schoolmastsrg, 
and 44 scholars, who are lodged, have a good edn- 
cation, and are supplied with all the necessaries of 
life ; the students at the universities have £20 per 
annum each, for eight years : there are nine eccle- 
siastical preferments in the patronage of the gover- 
nors. The hospital is lor 80 decayed merchants 
or military officers, each of whom has £14 per 
annum, besides a gown, provision, fuel, and two 
handsome apartments: they dine in a common 
hall, and attend prayers daily. 

In Suffolk Lane, Canon Street, stands iha Mer- 
chant Tailors' School, fSounded in 1561 by the 
Company of Merchant Tailors; the present spa- 
cious buildings occupy the site of a former house 
destroyed by the Great Fire ; they are supported 
on the east by stone pillars, forming a cloister, and 
containing apartments for three ushen. Alining 
the school is the library and chapel, and near these 
a house for the head-master. The school is con- 
ducted by a principal, tbrce under-masters, and 
two writing-masters; there ore about 300 boys, 
of whom 100 are taught gratis, 50 at 2s. 6d. per 
quarter, and 100 at 58. There are certain annasi 




ezamiBations of the scholars, of whom seyeral ore 
sent to the aniYersities, this school having 46 fel- 
lowships at 8t. John's college, Oxford, alone. 

The City of London School, in Milk Street, is a 
handsome Elizabethan building, erected from de- 
signs by Mr. Bunning in 1835; it vras foanded in 
1447, and about 500 boys are educated here, at 
about £8 per annum each. There are also various 
minor schools in different parts of the metropolis 
maintained by charity, the parish schools, the 
Lsncasterian and national schools, and upwards of 
400 private schools. 

OUT-HOePETALB, && 

At Hyde Park Comer is situated St. George** 
Hospital, established in 1733, for the sick and 
lame; it has recently been handsomely rebuilt 
from designs by Mr. Wilkins, and the front, 
which is 200 feet long, is faced with cement to 
imitate stone. It contains 29 wards and 460 beds, 
and has a theatre for lectures and a museum. 

The London Hospital, in the Whitechap^l Road, 
was established in 1740, and the present spacious 
bailding erected in 1759 ; it was instituted for the 
relief of sick and wounded seamen, watermen, 
oodheavers, shipwrights, ropemakers, labourers 
on the docks, &c. ; there is an accumulating fund 
attached to tlie hospital, managed by 21 guardians, 
cb(»en once in three years. 

The Middlesex Hospital is a spacious and com- 
modious edifice, with accommodation for 300 pa- 
tients, sitoated in Charles Street, Cavendish 
Square. It waa founded in 1745, for the reception 
of the sick and lame, the relief of lying-in married 
women, and the supply of the indigent and labori- 
008 with advice, relief, medicine, and lodging; and 
in 1792 a ward waa fitted up for the use of patients 
afflicted with cancer, who may stay during their 
life. It is governed by a patron, a president, four- 
teen vice-presidents, and a committee of the gover- 
ntos, or of those who subscribe three guineas 
annually, or thirty guineas at one payment. 

There are several Lying-in Hospitals, the prin- 
cipal ones beingj that in Brownlow Street, Drury 
Lane, established in 1749 ; that in Lisson Grove, 
established in 1752; that in the aty Boad, insti- 
tuted in 1750; and those called the Maternity 
Oiarity, the benevolent Institution, the Royal 
West London Infirmary, the Westminster Lying- 
in Institution, the Royal British Ladies' Institu- 
tioD, the Ladies' Benevolent Institution, the St. 
Andrew's Ljring-in Charity, the Mother and Infant 
Friend Society, the Agar Street Benevolent Insti- 
tution, the Charlotte Street Lying-in Dispensary, 
the Husbury Institution, and the Long Acre Cha- 
pel Dorcas Society. 

The principal hospitals which have not been 
menticmed are, the North Albion Hospital, Upper 
Gower Street; CharingCross Hospital, King William 
Street ; Central Lying-in Charity and Dispensary for 
Females, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields; 
Lock Hospital, near Hyde Park Comer ; Ophthal- 
mic Infirmary, Moorfields ; Ophthalmic Infirmary, 
King William Street, Strand; Samaritan Society; 
Free Hospital for the cure of malignant diseases, 
Hatton Garden: Sea-bathing Infirmary for the 
Poor; Grey Coat Hospital, Sutton Ground, for 
the education of poor children ; St. John's Hospi- 

YOL.UL 



tal, St. John's Square ; St. John's British Hospital, 
Hatton Garden ; Royal Universal Infirmary for 
Children, Waterloo Bridge Road; London Fever 
Hospital, Pancras Road; Grey Coat Hospital or 
School, Tothill Fields. 

ALMSHOUSES, &C 

There are also numerous excellent and well- 
endowed almshouses in various parts of the metro- 
polis, the chief of which are. Lady Dacre's Alms- 
houses, Tothill Fields ; Aske's Hospital or Haber- 
dashers' Almshouses, Hoxton, rebuilt in a hand- 
some and commodious style in 1826; Licensed 
Victuallers* Asylum, Old Kent Road, consisting of 
101 houses, &c. There are a gi-eat number of 
dispensaries, established to supply the poor with 
medical assistance, when their absence from em- 
ployment is not necessary. 

Among the chief miscellaneous charities may 
be mentioned the Royal Humane Society, Chatham 
Place, established in 1774, for the recovery of per- 
sons apparently drowned, and for rewarding those 
who have saved the lives of other persons from 
drowning. The society has eighteen receiving- 
houses in the metropolis, the principal of which is 
near the Serpentine, in Hyde Park: the Small 
Debt Relief Society was established in 1772, for 
the discharge of persons imprisoned for small 
debts: the Mendicity Society was established in 
1818, for the purpose of removing from the streets 
every description of mendicants : the Philanthropic 
Society, recently removed to Norwood, founded in 
1788, for teaching children who have been engaged 
in criminal courses, or the children of convicted 
felons, such trades as may enable them to earn an 
honest living : and the Prison Discipline Society, 
in Aldermanbury, was established for the ameliora- 
tion of jails : the Marine Society, Bishopgate Street, 
is an institution for qualifying poor boys for the 
sea service: the African Institution was founded 
in 1807, for the purpose of instructing and civilis- 
ing Africa. 

St. Catherine's Hospital, originally founded by 
Matilda, the queen of Stephen, about 1145, stands 
on the east of Regent's Park, where it was erected 
when the original edifice was taken down, to make 
room for the St. Catherine Docks. Several other 
queens were great benefactors to this hospital, 
which takes its name, however, from Catherine, 
the wife of Henry VIII. The building, erected 
from designs by A. Poynter, Esq., is of brick, in 
the pointed style. The collegiate church contains 
an organ with a larger swell than any in England, 
and also a curious wooden pulpit and stalls. 

Besides these charities, there are others too 
numerous to mention, for the relief of the poor of 
London, and of natives of Scotland, Ireland, France, 
Poland, &c., Covent Garden and Drury Lane 
Theatrical Fund for actors and actresses. Refuge for 
the Destitute, Seamen's Hospital, &c., &c. Several 
of the principal charities have valuable libraries 
attached to them. 

LTIEBABT AMD PHIIXMSOPHICAI. INBTITtJTIOHS. 

The number of literary, philosophical, and other 
learned and scientific institutions, is very great, 
and is continually increasing, so that there is 
scarcely any branch of science but what is repre- 




Bested by some society of persons interested in its 
development There is the Apothecaries' Society, 
which holds its meetings in a handsome hall in 
Water Lane, Bhickixiars ; the Medical Society, in 
Bolt Court, Fleet Street ; the Veterinary College, 
Camden Town; the Medical Society, Lincoln's-Inn- 
Fields ; the Linnean Society ; Geological Society ; 
and such a Tariety of others, each of which is 
devoting its energies to the study of some high 
branch of science or literature, that no space can 
be spared even for a bare enumeimtion of ihtm. 

m 

CIVIL AHD CRIMIVAL COUim. 

By a recent act of parliament, courts are held 
in various parts of London, for the recovery of 
small debts not exceeding £50. They are aU of 
them commodious buildings, and are presided over 
by gentlemen of the bar of acknowledge talent. 
The prisons of the metropolis which we have not 
before mentioned, are as follow : — Giltspur Street 
Prison, to the north of Newgate, was erected to 
supply the place of the old city prisons called 
compters ; it is used for the reception of vagrants, 
and persons waiting for examination. The build- 
ing consists of an extensive pile of rustic stone* 
work. The New Debtors' Prison, Whitecross 
Street, was erected in 1813, to confine those unfor- 
tunate persons who would otherwise have been 
imprisoned in Newgate. The Tothill Fields Bride- 
well, Westminster, was rebuilt in 1831, fiom de- 
signs by Mr. Abrahams. The Borough Compter 
is a prison belonging to the city of London, with 
a jurisdiction extending over five parishes in South- 
wark. The New Bridewell Prison, near Beth- 
lehem Hospital, is a commodious building, erected 
in 1829, as a substitute for the Gty Bridewell, 
Blackfriars. There are several houses of correction 
in different parts of London. 

DISaEHTIKa CHAPEIiB. 

London contains numerous places of worship for 
dissenters of almost every denomination : for the 
Wesleyan Methodists, Whitefield Methodists, Bap- 
tists, Unitarians, Scotch Calvinists, Presbyterians, 
those of the Scotch Secession, Moravians, Hunt- 
ingtonians, those of Lady Huntingdon's persua- 
sion, Calvinists, Swedonborgiaos, Sandemanians, 
Arians, and Freethinkers ; also for the Society of 
Friends, for Roman Catholics, and for Jews. There 
are also the fdilowing foreign Protestant churches 
and chapels: French, German, Dutch, Bossian, 
Swiss, Swedish, Danish, and Armenian. The 
French and Dutch church (for it is used for both), 
in Austin Friars, is a spacious Gothic building of 
great antiquity, having been erected in 1351, and 
has a library attached to it, which contains some 
curious old MSS., amongst which are some letters 
of Calvin and others of die old reformers. 

lavoft PLACES or sirasnAiinfEiiT. 

Besides the places of amusement that have been 
already mentioned, there are several minor theatres 
and saJoons in which dramatic entertainments take 
place — ^the Queen's Theatre, in Tottenham Court 
Boad; the City of London Theatre, in Norton 
Folgate ; the CHty Theatre, in Milton Street ; and 
the £agle Tavern, in the City Boad, are the prin- 
cipal cS these. There ai'e also several spacious 



and elegantly fitted up apartments open during 
the winter as ctuinot^ in which dancing takes 
place from an early hour in the evening till eleven 
o'clock : the chief ones are at the Argyll Booms, 
in the Haymarket; the Adelaide Gallery, in the 
Lowther Arcade, &c. The miscellaneous exhibi- 
tions of eveiy kind — panoramas, dioramas, wax- 
works, &a, &0., in different parts of London, are 
almost numberiess. 

DISTItfGUISHED KATXVU OF LOVDOK. 

London has given birth to a great number of in- 
dividuals who have risen to eminence in learning, 
in the arts and sciences, or by great and noble 
actions. It was the birth-place of Ingulphus, an 
English historian, who was bom about lOiSO, and, 
at the age of twenty-one, became secretary to Wil- 
liam, D^e of Normandy. He afterwards made a 
pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and became a Bene- 
dictine monk. On William's accession to the 
throne of England, he was made abbot of Croyland, 
and relbuilt ibat monastery, for which he obtained 
many privileges. He wrote its history from 664 
to 1091, and died m 1109. 

Thomas k Becket, also a native of London, was 
a man of humble origin, who, having been raised to 
the archbishopric of Canterbury by Henry II., be- 
came proud and insolent, and opposed the policy 
of his royal master. The king, having uttered 
some hasty exprepsions against him, was the cause 
of his being assassinated by four of his courtiers, at 
the altar of Canterbury cathedral, in 1170. He 
was canonised after his death. 

Matthew of Westminster was a Benedictine 
monk, who flourished in the fourteenth century. 
As an historian he is highly esteemed for his vera- 
city and diligence. 

Geoffirey Chaucer, the father of English poetiy, 
was bom in 1328, and at first studied law in the 
Temple, but soon afterwards became successively 
yeoman and shield-bearer to Edward III., and 
comptroller of the customs of London. In the fol- 
lowing reign he became a follower of WicklilTe, 
and was imprisoned, but soon- afterwards was 
released on recanting his opinions. He then re- 
tired to Woodstock, and composed his treatise on 
the astrolabe. He married a connexion of John of 
Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and died in 1400. 

Dr. Jolm Colet was bom in 1466, and became 
dean of St. Paul's. He was a great scholar, and 
famous for his encouragement of learning, of which 
his foundation of SL Paul's school is a lasting 
memoriaL He died in 1519. 

Sir Thomas More was the son of Bit John More, 
Judge of the King's Bench, and was bom in 1480. 
He was educated at Oxford, and, in 1499, became 
a student of Lincoln's Inn. At twenty-one he ob- 
tained a seat in parliament, and, in 1508, he was 
made judge of the sheriff's court. In 1518 ho 
published his famous political romance of " Uto- 
pia," and soon after, by the interest of Wolsey, 
obtained the honour of knighthood, and a place in 
the privy council. In 1520, he was made trea- 
surer of the Exchequer; in 1523, speaker of the 
House of Commons. In 1530, ho succeeded Wol- 
sey as lord chancellor, in which office he was ao 
industrious, that, in a short time, there was not a 
cause left undetermined. He resigned the seals 




I 



Iwcanae be coald not sopport Henry m his dir^nce 
with Queen Catherine, and was at last committed 
to the Tower for refhsing the oath of supremacy. 
He was tried in the King's Bench, found gnilty of 
tieason, and sentenced to be beheaded. He was 
aecoidmgly executed on the 6th July, 1535, de- 
meaning Idmaelf on the scaffold with manly forti- 
tude and resignation. 

John Leland, the famous antiquary, was bom 
towards the end of the reign of Henry VII. He 
became diaplain and^librarian to Henry Yin., who 
also appointed him his antiquary, with a com- 
mission to examine all the libraries of all the cathe- 
drals, abbejTS, and colleges in the kingdom. For 
six years he travelled, collecting materials for the 
history and antiquities of England and Wales; 
but rethring to his house in London, after about 
two years, he died insane, in 1552, without com- 
pleting bis undertaking. 

John Stow, the fauKms antiquary, was bom in 
Oomhin, about 1525. He was bred a tailor, but 
soon deToted himself to the study of antiquities. 
His " Summary of the Cfhronicles of England," 
which was his first work, he enlarged in 1600, and 
published under the title of Flores Historium, or 
Annals of the Kingdom, from the time of the an- 
cient Britons. In 1598 appeared his ** Surrey of 
London." He was compelled, in his old age, to 
sofidt charity by means of a brief. His death 
took place in 1605. 

William Camden, the well-known antiquary, 
was bom in 1551, and studied at Oxford, where he 
took his B.A. degree. He afterwards became 
second and chief master of Westminister School, 
and was ultimately appointed to the lucratiye post 
of dareneienx king-at-arms. Besides his oiole- 
btated work, '' The Britannia," he wrote **■ Annals 
of Queen Elizabeth," a ** Greek Grammar," &c 
He died in 1623. 

Edmund Spenser, one of the greatest poets Eng- 
land has produced, was bom about 1553, was edu- 
cated at Oambridge, and afterwards took up his 
rendeaoe in the north of England. In 15^ he 
became secretary to Lord Grey de Wilton, viceroy 
of Ireland, and procured a grant of 3,028 acres in 
the county of Oork, on which, however, he was 
obliged to become resident ; Sir Walter Raleigh, 
who visited him here, induced him to write the 
" Fkerie Queen," which was printed in 1590, and 
presented to Elizabeth, who granted the poet an 
annual pension of £50. In 1596 he published the 
leeond part of his great poem, which, however, 
WIS never completed according to the original 
plan. When Lord Tyrone's rebellion broke out, 
be was obliged to fly with such haste, that he left 
behind him his infant son, whom the f^ous in- 
surgents burnt in the house. Spenser came to 
England, and died heart-broken, on January 16, 
1598-9 ; he was interred in Westminster Abbey 
by the Earl of Essex, and a monument was raised 
to his memory by the Countess of Dorset. 

Frands Bacon, the son of the lord-keeper, 6Sr 
Nicholas Bacon, was bora in 1561 : on the acces- 
sion of James I. he was knighted, and made a 
king's counsel; he afterwards became solicitor- 
general, and at last rose to the dignity of Lord 
High Cbancellor of Great Britain, Baron Yerulam, 
and Viscount St Albans ; he was, however, ac- 



cused of corruption in his office, dismissed, and 
heavily fined. He then retired firom public life, 
and spent the remainder of his days in study, pro- 
ducing those philosophical works which have ren- 
dered his name immortal : he died in 1626. Ed- 
ward Alleyn was a famous actor in the reigns of 
Elizabeth and James ; he was born in 1566, 
founded Dulwich CoUege, in which he became first 
master, and died in 1626. Inigo Jones, the fa- 
mous architect, was bora about 1572, and was at 
first apprenticed to a joiner, but displaying a great 
taste for drawing, was sent to Italy by the Earl 
of Pembroke : the study of the works of Palladio 
at Venice having given bim a taste for architec- 
ture, he devoted himself to that art, in which he 
soon became eminent, and was appointed first ar- 
chitect to diristian IV., king of Denmark, with 
whom he visited England in 1606. He was in- 
duced to remain here, became architect to the 
queen, and in the following reign was lucratively 
employed in preparing masques, to be shown be- 
fore the court, and erecting the Banqneting-honse 
at Whitehall, thus realizing a handsome fortune ; 
but on the breaking out of the civil war, he suf- 
fered severely as a Roman catholic and a royalist, 
and at last died on July 21, 1652. 

Dr. John Donne was bora in 1573, and, though 
the son of a catholic, embraced the protestant 
faith, and became secretary to Lord Chancellor 
Ellesmere: he was imprisoned for having clan- 
destinely married the chancellor's niece, and after- 
wards took orders, when he became chaplain to 
King James, and afterwards preacher of Lincoln's 
Inn, and dean of St. Paul's: he died in 1631. Dr. 
Johnson characterises him' as the founder of the 
metaphysical school of poetry; and his works 
comprise. Letters, Sermons, Theological Essays, 
&c. Benjamin Jonson, a great dramatist, and a 
friend of Shakspeare, was the posthumous son of a 
clergyman, and was born in 1574, at Westmin- 
ster : when his mother married again to a brick- 
layer, he was taken by his father-in-law from the 
grammar-school at which he had been placed, to 
assist in the trade ; he soon, however, left home, 
and served as a private soldier in the army in 
Flanders, on his return from which he resumed 
his studies, but was forced, from poverty, to take 
to the stage. Having killed another actor in a 
duel, he was Imprisoned for some time, but, on his 
release, married, and commenced writing for the 
stage. ** Every Man in his Humour " was pro- 
duced in 1598, and followed successively by all 
his other plays; on the accession of James I. he 
composed the masques and entertainments for the 
court, but joining Chapman and Marston in the 
comedy of " Eastward Ho," a gross libel on the 
Scotch nation, the three were imprisoned, and had 
a narrow escape from losing their ears and nose, 
according to the sentence. In 1617 he was ap- 
pointed poet laureate, with an annual pension of 
£100 and a butt of Canary, having besides a pen- 
sion he enjoyed from the city : he died on the 1 6th 
August, 1637, and was inteiTed In Westminster 
Abbey, where there is a handsome tablet to his 
memory, inscribed ** O rare Ben Jonson I" 

John Milton, one of the most illustrious poets 
that ever lived, was the son of a scrivener, and 
was bora in Bread Street in 1608 : having been 




educated at Cambridge, he settled at Horton, in 
Backinghamshire, where he wrote his ** ComuSf" 
" L* Allegro," *' II Penseroso," and " Lycidas;" he 
trayelled through France and Italy in 1638, and 
afterwards settled in London, where, on the dis- 
turbances commencing between the king and the 
parliament, he sided with the latter, and wrote 
several political pamphlets in favour of his view 
of the question. In 1643 he married the daugh- 
ter of Richard Powell, Esq., a magistrate of Ox- 
fordshire, but his wife left him, and returned to 
her parents soon after their marriage ; but a re- 
conc^iation was subsequently brought about 
Milton continued his writings in defence of the 
republican party, but soon after became deprived . 
of his sight He subsequently was appointed 
Latin secretary to CromweU, and on the Restora- 
tion was excepted from the act of indemnity : he 
obtained his pardon, however, through the interest 
of Sir William Davenant and others, and soon 
afterwards lost his second wife, whom he had 
married during the Commonwealth, but married 
for the third time. At the time of the plague he 
removed to Chalfont, in Buckinghamshire, where 
he completed his " Paradise Lost," for which he 
received only £15, and that paid by instalments: 
subsequently he wrote his " Paradise Regained :" 
his death took place at his house in Bunhill Row, 
in 1674, and he was buried in the church of St. 
Giles, Cripplegate ; he has also a monument in 
Westminster Abbey. 

Algernon Sidney was the second son of Robert, 
Earl of Leicester, and was bom in 1617, and edu- 
cated for a military life; he served against the 
Irish insurgents under his brother Lord Lisle, and 
on his return, in 1643, Joined the parliamenta- 
rians ; he afterwards became governor of Dover, 
and was nominated a member of tlie high court of 
justice for the trial of the king, which measure he 
approved of and vindicated, although he did not 
sign the warrant of execution. He was also hos- 
tile to the government of Cromwell, and during the 
Commonwealth retired to Penshurst, where he 
composed his famous ** Discourse on Govern- 
ment" In 1659 he was sent as a commissioner 
to mediate between Sweden and Norway : on the 
Restoration, he remained abroad till 1677 ; in 
1683 he was arrested, with Lord William Russell 
and others, for being concerned in the Ryehouse 
Plot, and being tried before the chief justice, Jef- 
fries, was convicted illegally, and unjustly exe- 
cuted on the 7th December, 1678. 

Abraham Cowley, the posthumous son of a 
grocer, was bom in 1618, educated at Westmin- 
ster, and elected a scholar of Trinity College, Cam- 
bridge, where he produced some of his poetry : he 
was ejected from the university in 1643, by the 
puritans, and then became a warm partisan of the 
royal cause, in serving which he suffered much. 
Soon after the Restoration, he obtained the lease 
of a farm at Chertsey, which produced him about 
£300 per annum, but he did not long enjoy it, for 
he died in 1667. Sir William Temple, the son of 
Sir John Temple, master of the rolls and a privy 
councillor in Ireland, was bom in 1628, and 
studied at Cambridge; he afterwards travelled 
over the Continent for six years, and in 1665 he 
went to Munster on a secret mission. Having 



engaged himself in the formation of the triple al- 
liance between England, Sweden, and Holland, he 
became resident minister at the Hague, but was 
recalled in 1669, and retired to Sheen, where he 
wrote his " Observations on the United Provinces." 
In 1674, Sir William was again ambassador to the 
States-General ; and in 1679, was appointed secre- 
tary of state, but resigning office the next year, 
he retired to his country seat in Surrey, where he 
continued till his death, which took place in 1700. 

Isaac Barrow, D.D., was an eminent theologian 
and great mathematician, on both of which sub- 
jects he wrote several learned works : Charles II. 
said of him that he was an unfair preacher, for he 
exhausted every subject on which he discoursed: 
he was bom in 1630; became vice-chancellor of 
Cambridge in 1657, and died in 1677. Edmund 
Hallcy, the famous astronomer and mathema- 
tician, was bom in 1656, and educated at St 
Paul's school and at Oxford, where, in 1676, 
I he published some observations on the sun, 
by which the motion of that luminary on its 
axis is determined; he afterwards went to St 
Helena, where he determined the position of 350 
stars, and on his return was created master of arts, 
and chosen a fellow of the Royal Society. He 
afterwards travelled for the promotion of his favour- 
ite science through Europe, when he discovered 
the great comet, which again appeared in 1835; 
made two voyages to the Western Ocean; con- 
structed a correct chart of the Channel ; journeyed 
to Dalmatia; in 1703 was appointed Savilian pro- 
fessor of geometry at Oxford; in 1713 became 
secretary to the Royal Society, and in 1719 suc- 
ceeded Flamstead as astronomer-royal, in which 
office he continued till his death in 1741-2. During 
his long and useful life, he published many valua- 
ble works on astronomy. 

Daniel Defoe, whose family name was Foe, was 
the son of a butcher, and bom in 1660. In 1688 
he kept a hosier's shop in Comhill, and in 1695 
was made accomptant to the commissioners of gloss 
duty, which he continued till the impost was abol- 
ished ; he subsequently wrote several satires and 
political pamphlets, for which he was imprisoned 
more than once. In 1719 appeared the work by 
which he is best known, "Robinson Crusoe;" he 
was the author of several other novels and miscel- 
laneous works, and died in 1781. Anthony Ashley 
Cooper, third Earl of Shaftesbury, was bom in 
1671 ; in 1693 he became member of parliament 
for Poole in Dorsetshire ; he was obliged, on account 
of his health, to retire from political life, and de- 
voting himself to study, and corresponding with 
the literati of the day, he became eminent as a 
writer, and is distinguished for his lively ond^ 
elegant style ; he died in 1713. 

Colley Cibber, the son of the famous sculptor, 
was bom in 1671, and on the completion of his 
education entered the army; but when about eigh- 
teen years of age went upon the stage, where he 
soon became a popular favourite. In 1695 ap- 
peared his first piece of " Love's Lost Shift," 
which was followed by " Woman's Wit," and a 
number of other pieces, many of which are still 
favourites. He was made poet laureate, and con- 
tinued writing and playing till his death in 1757. 
Sir John Vanbmgh, the descendant of a Flemish 




fiunilj, wu bom in 1672, and at first entered the 
■nny, Imt soon turned dramatic writer, and pro- 
duced the "Kelapee,** the "Confederacy/' and 
■ereial other witty and stili &Toarite pieces ; he 
was also a good architect, and erected Blenheim 
House, Castle^Koward, &c. ; he was afterwards 
appointed Clarencieox king-at-arms, and in 1714 
reoeiyed the honoor of knighthood; he was also 
comptroller of the Board of Works, and surveyor of 
Greenwich Hospital ; he died in 1726. 

Alexander Pope, the son of a wealthy linen- 
draper in Lombard Street, was bom in 1668, and 
his parents being Roman Catholics, was instmcted 
by one Taremer, a priest : when twelve years of 
age he retired with his parents to Binfield, in 
Windsor Forest, where he wrote his "Ode on 
SoBtnde." At the age of sixteen he wrote his 
" Pastorals ;'' several of his minor poems followed, 
and at last he pnblished his translation of Homer's 
Diad, by sabscription. By that he cleared above 
£5,000, with which he purchased a residence at 
Twickenham. In 1727 his "Dnnciad" appeared, 
as a satire on the numerous minor poets who had 
attacked him ; the remainder of his poems followed 
in succession until his death, which took place on 
May 30, 1744, at the age of 56. 

George Lillo was bom in 1693, and for many 
years carried on the business of a jeweller, but de- 
voted much of his time to the production of trage- 
dies, some of which are still frequently performed ; 
he died in 1739. 

AVilliam Dormer Stanhope, "Earl of Chesterfield, 
was bom in 1694, and before the death of his 
father sat in parliament for Lostwithiel ; he was 
a great favourite with George II., who made him 
a privy oouncillor, appointed him ambassador ex- 
traordinary to Holland in 1728, made him a knight 
of the garter in 1730, and afterwards appointed 
him steward of the household. The last office he 
soon resigned, and energetically opposed Sir Robert 
Wa^le ; in 1745 he was appointed lord-lieutenant 
of Ireland, the duties of which office he ably ful- 
filled ; he subsequently became secretary of state, 
but was obliged from his ill health to resign that 
post in 1748. He is chiefly known as an author 
by his famous " Letters to his Son ;" he died in 
1773. 

William Hogarth was bom in 1698, and was 
bound an apprentice to an engraver of arms on 
silver plate. About 1720 he engraved coats of 
arms and shop bills, and afterwards executed plates 
for the booksellers. His first painting was a re- 
presentation of Wanstead Assembly. He married 
a daughter of Sir James ThomhiU in 1730, and 
soon idTterwarda executed some paintings for the 
deooration of the Gardens at Vauxball. His 
"Harlot's Progress'^ appeared in 1733, and was 
followed by those satirical representations of vice 
and folly, which stamped him as the greatest ori- 
ginal painter of life and manners that England has 
produced. In 1757 he was made sergeant-painter 
to the king ; and having, by his own exertions, 
seeoied wealth and eminence, died in 1762, and was 
buried at Chiswick. 

John JoTtin, D.D., famous as a scholar and a 
divine, was born in 1698, and educated at Cam- 
bridge, where he was employed by Pope to extract 
the notes from £ustathiu8 to print with the Iliad. 



He afterwards held several livings in succession, 
was a prebendary of St. Paul's, and archdeacon of 
London. He was the author of several valuable 
theological and ecclesiastical works, and as much 
beloved for his private virtues, as admired for his 
piety and talents : he died in 1770. Philip Dod- 
dridge, a talented and pious dissenting minister, was 
bom in 1702, and was successively a minister at 
Kibworth, Market-Harborongb, and Northampton. 
He wrote several valuable works, and died at Lis- 
bon, where he had gone for the benefit of his 
health, in 1751. 

John Dollond was bom in Spitalfields in 1706, 
and brought up as a silk-weaver, but devoting 
himself to astronomy, particularly to the construc- 
tion of telescopes and other astronomical instru- 
ments, became eminent as an optician, which 
business he carried on in conjunction with his 
eldest son Peter, who also made some valuable 
improvements in optical instruments. He died in 
1761 ; his brother Peter died in 1820. 

Dr. Thomas Augustine Ame was bom in 1704, 
and at the age of eighteen produced the opera of 
** Rosamund ;" he attained a great eminence as a 
composer, some of his melodies being the most 
beautiful ever produced. The famous Mrs. Cibber 
was his sister : he died in 1778. Richard Glover, 
the son of a London merchant, was bom in 1712, 
and was educated at Cbeam School, where, at six- 
teen years of age, he composed some excellent ver- 
ses to the memory of Sir Isaac Newton ; he after- 
wards became engaged in the Hamburgh trade 
under his father; in 1737 he married a lady of for- 
tune, and soon afterwards produced "Leonidas" 
and his other poems. He now became distin- 
guished as a city politician, and showed that he 
possessed great oratorical ability. On the acces- 
sion of George III. he represented Weymouth in 
parliament: he died in 1785. James Stuart, 
generally known as *' Athenian Stuart," was bom 
in 1713, and originally was a fan-painter, but hav- 
ing studied Greek, Latin, and the mathematics, 
ti'avelled to Italy on foot, and accompanied by a 
skilful architect, named Nicholas Rivett, visited 
Athens, and made drawings of the architectural 
remains there. On his return he acquired great 
eminence as an architect, and became F.R.S. and 
F.S.A. : he died in 1788. 

Thomas Gray was born in 1716, educated at 
Eton and Cambridge, and at first studied for the 
bar, but was persuaded to accompany Horace 
Walpole on the Continent; but he left him at 
Reggio, and retumed to England. In 1747 he 
published his " Ode on a distant prospect of Eton 
College," and some years afterwards his ** Elegy 
written in a Country Churchyard." Having re- 
fused the office of laureate on Cibber's death, he 
was presented by the Duke of Grafton with the 
professorship of modem history at Cambridge, 
with a salary of £400 per annum. Besides his 
poetical talents. Gray possessed much learning in 
natural history, ancient architecture, and other 
varieties of literature : he died in 1771. 

Sir William Blackstone, an eminent judge, and 
well known as the author of the celebrated ** Com- 
mentaries," and other valuable works on law, was 
bom in 1723, and died in 1780. John Wilkes, 
famous for his violent political conduct, was bom 



LON 



110 



LON 



in 1727, had a good educatioD, and after tiaTelling 
on the Continent, married a lady of fortune, and 
became colonel of the Buckinghamshire Militia ; 
he was M.P. for Aylesbury in 1761, but publishing 
a libel in No. 45 of the * North Briton,' a periodical 
ho had established, he was seized on a general 
warrant of the secretary of state, and committed 
to the Tower, bat being brought up on a kaheoi 
corpus before the chief justice of the Common Pleas, 
was liberated. He was again prosecuted for the 
publication of an obscene poem, and retiring to 
France, was outlawed. In 1768 he was elected 
an M.P. for Middlesex, but was prevented from 
taking his scat, and committed to the King's 
Bench prison, on which some dreadful riots took 
place in St George's Fields ; his debts were then 
paid by subscription; he afterwards became mayor 
of London, and took his seat for Middlesex with- 
out opposition : he died in 1797. 

Charles Churchill, the famous satirist, was edu- 
cated at Westminster, contracted an early and im- 
prudent marriage, and, entering holy orders, ob- 
tained a small Welsh curacy, which he vacated on 
the death of his father, succeeding him as curate 
of St. John's, Westminster. Being very extrava- 
gant, he was about to be imprisoned for debt, when 
Dr. Lloyd, of Westminster School, brought about a 
compromise with his creditors. Churchill now pro- 
duced the *' Rosciad," a satii'e on the principal actors 
of the time; and this proving successful, he followed 
it by several others, displaying great powers of sati- 
rical description. He then lived separate from his 
wife, but died at the early age of 34, in 1764. Kich- 
ard Cough, the famous antiquary and topogfrapher, 
was bom in 1735, and at a very early age translated 
some works from the French, and in 1752 com- 
menced studying at Cambridge, but soon devoted 
himself to antiquarian researches, in which he at- 
tained gpreat celebrity : he died in 1809. 

Samuel Horsley, bom in 1733, was educated at 
Westminster and Cambridge, and successively held 
several livings, till he arrived at the episcopal dig- 
nity ; he also rendered great services to the cause 
of science, and published some valuable works on 
theology and dassical literature. William Mil- 
ford, the famous historical and philological writer, 
was bom in 1734, studied at Oxford and then at 
the Middle Temple, but quitting the study of the 
law, became colonel of the Hampshire Militia : he 
sat in parliament, successively, for Newport, Beer- 
alston, and New Romney, was professor of ancient 
history at the Boyal Academy, and, besides his 
** History of Greece,'* wrote many valuable works: 
he died in 1827. Anne Seymour Damer, who ob- 
tained great eminence as a sculptor, as well as for 
her general accomplishments, was bom in 1748, 
being the daughter of Field-Marshal Conway ; she 
took lessons in sculpture firom Ceraoci and Bacon, 
and subsequently studied in Italy: her death took 
place in 1808. John Milner, an eminent Roman 
Catholic divine and antiquarian, was bom in 1752, 
ordained a priest in 1777, and commenced his pas- 
toral duties at Winchester in 1779. Taking a 
great interest in the study of the antiquities with 
which Winchester abounds, he published several 
works on them, besides others in support of the 
Roman Catholic faith; he became a member of 
the Royal Society of Antiquaries in 1790, visited 



Borne in 1814, afterwards returned to England, and 
till the time of his death continued to puMish oon* 
trO'Versial treatises: he died in 1826. Sir Samuel 
RomiUy (the descendant of a French Protestant 
family, who left France after the revocatioii of the 
edict of Nantes), bom in 1757, was at first in- 
tended for a solicitor, but afterwards studied for 
the bar ; he rose to eminence, and ultimately took 
the lead in the Court of Chancery, being possessed 
of great eloquence and information. In 1806 he 
was appcnnted solicitor-general, and knighted ; he 
made the most strenuous efforts for the revision of 
the criminal code of England, but being afflicted 
with brain fever at the loss of his wife, be put an 
end to his life in November, 1818. 

The Right Hon. George Canning was bom on 
the 11th April, 1770, and was left fiitheriess when 
quite an infant ; he was placed, however, at Win- 
chester, and afterwards at Eton ; he also distin- 
guished himself at Oxford, and then commenced 
studying for the bar, but being introduced to the 
House of Commons by Mr. Pitt, he devoted him- 
self entirely to politics. In 1796 he was appointed 
under secretary of state, and, in 1800, married a 
daughter of General Soott, "with a fortune of 
£100,000; he afterwards became foreign secretary 
in Percival's administration, but in consequence of 
a duel with Lord Castlereagh, was oblig^ to quit 
office. In 1812 he became M.P. for Liverpool, 
and, in 1816, was appointed president of the Board 
of Control, but retii^ from that office in 1820. 
He was afterwards, in 1822, appointed governor- 
general of India, but the death of the Marquis of 
Londonderry then taking place, he became secre- 
tary of state for the foreign department. He soon 
afterwards became premier, but over-exertion and 
excitement aggravating the effects of a cold taken 
at the funeral of the Duke of Yoric, he died of an 
inflammatory disease in 1827, at the age of 57. 

The Right Hon. Qeorge Gordon Byron, Lord 
Byron, was bom on the 2d January, 1788, and was 
placed at an early age at the grammar-school of 
Aberdeen by his widowed mother; but when, in 
1798, by the death of his great-uncle without issue, 
he succeeded to the family title and estates, he 
was placed under the guardianship of Lord Carlisle, 
who sent him to Harrow; he subsequently studied 
at Cambridge, and afterwards took up his residence 
at Newstead Abbey, and published his " Hours of 
Idleness,^' which being criticised rather 8ev«rely, 
he produced his satire of ^^ English Bards and 
Scotch Reviewers," the most spirited poem of the 
kind in the English language^ At that period he 
became plunged in eztravagsnoe and dissipation, 
and travelled on the Continent for some time. On 
his return he published his first two cantos of 
" Childe Harold's Pilgrimage,*' which was followed 
by the " Giaour," '' Bride of Abydos," and other 
poems. In 1815 he manned the daughter of Sir 
Ralph Milbanke Noel, but the union was not a 
happy one, and they separated alter the birth of 
their daughter, which was the only fruit of their 
marriage. Lord Byron again travelled through 
various parts of the Continent, publislung Us 
poems at intervals; till, in 1823, the statocf the 
Greeks, when in collision with tiieir lato mastsn 
the Turks, exciting his sympathy, he determloed 
to devote himself entirely to their oanae; but be- 



LOK 



111 



LON 



ing attacked hy a feyer, he was buried at Missi- 
longM, on the 19th of April, 1824, in the d7th 
year of his age, 

LONDON-COLNET, Hebttobd, a ohapeky on 
the north-vestem hank of the Cohie, in the parish 
of St. Peter and St Alban's — (which see for ac- 
cess, &C.} : 3 miles from St. Alhan'B.^o*ci-Money 
orders issued at St. Alban's : London letters deliv*^ 
8 a.m. : post^ closes 6 p.m. -c»o^ The living (St. 
Peter) is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Roches- 
ter: pres. net income, £120: patron. Countess of 
Caledon: prea. incumbent, M. Barnard, 1826. — 
(Returns with the parish.) 

LONDONTHOBPE, Likoolh, a parish in the 
soke and union of Grantham, parts of Kesteyen : 
157 miles from London (ooach road 112), 4 from 
Gmnthsm, 9 from Sleafoid.-o«»^Nor. West. RaiL 
through Rugby and Nottingham to Grantham, 
thence 4 miles: from Derby, through Nottingham, 
&c., 43 mlles.-«M>.Money orders issued at Grant- 
ham : London letters dJeliv'* 9 a.m. : post doses 
5} p.m, ra i o The liying is a yicarage annexed to 
that of North Grantham: contains 1,5'iO acres: 
42 houses: pop*'* ,in 1841, 182: ass^ prop^* 
£2,333: poor rates in 1838, £55. 15s. Tithes 
conmxuted in 1795. 

LONG-BENTON. See Bbhtov-Loko. 

LONGBOROUGH wrra BANKFEB, Glouces- 
TBS, a parish in the upper diyision of the hun^ of 
Kiftsgate, union of Stow-on-the-Wold : 91 miles 
from London (coach road 83), 3 from Stow-on-the- 
WoU, 9 from Ghippmg-Norton.-eM>-Gt. West RaiL 
through Oxford to Stow-on-the-Wold, thence 3 
miles: from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Woroester to Stow, &o., 104 mile8.*eM»*MoQey or- 
ders issued at Morton-in-Marsh : London letters 
deliy^ 8 a.m. : post closes 5} p.m.-«M»>The paro* 
ehial charities produce about x4. 10s. per Awnnynr 
^oMi-The living (St. James), a yicarage, with the 
rectory of Sezincote, in the diocese o? Gloucester 
and Bristol, is valued at £5. 15s. : pres. net income, 
£221 : patrons. Lord Leigh and Sir C. Cockerel: 
pres. incumbent, A. C. H. Morrison, 1846 : con- 
tains 2,770 acres: 137 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
625: ass^ prop7- £4,075: noor rates in 1837, 
£283. 8s. Tithes, rectariaf and yicaxia], com- 
muted in 1794 

LONGBRIDGE, QumnEgm, a hamlet in the 
i^per diyiaioB of the hun'- of Berkeley. 

LONGBUBGH, CuMBBBLAjn>, a township in the 
parish of Boigh^n-tbe-Sands — (which see for ao- 
cesB, &&) — ^ward of Cumberland, crossed by ths 
Ship Canal: 310 miles-from London, 6 from Car- 
lisle, 10 from Wigton.-aa»-Money orders issued at 
Carlisle: LondoB letters deUv^ llj aon.: post 
closes 2 p.m. ■a»c» Contains 22 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 124.— (Other xetums with the parish.) 

LONGCOTT, Bbbks, a chapebry in the parish 
of Shrivenham — (which see for access, &o.) : 69 
miles from London, 4 from Farringdon, 9 from 
Waatage.-e«c»Money orders issued at Farringdon : 
London letters deliv^- 8 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m. 
a m is The living is a curacy, annexed to the vicar- 
age of Shrivenham : contains 93 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 504: ass<^ prop^- £3,023: poor rates in 
1838, £293. 15a. 

LONG CRITCHELL. See Cbitcseu (Lo»>)« 

LONGDON, SAbQP, a quurter in the parish of 



Pontesbuiy — (which see for aooess, &c.) : 156 miles 
from London, 6 from Shrewsbury, 17 from Mont- 
gomery .--ovo^ Money orders issued at Shrewsbury : 
London letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-oM>-Tbere is an Independent chapel here. The 
charities produce about £G0 a year.^o«o-The living 
is a donative curacy in the arcbd^- of Salop, and 
diocese of Hereford : pres. net income, £75 : pa- 
tron, Rev. £. Homfrey : pres. incumbent, £. Hom- 
frey, 1827 : pop"- in 1841, 371. Tithes commuted 
in 1840. — (Other returns with the parish.) 

LONGDON, Staffobd, a parish in the southern 
division of the hun^- of Offlow, union of Lichfield, 
in the line of the Grand Trunk Canal: 120 miles 
from London (coach road 124), 4 from Lichfield, 8 
from Abb6t's Bromley .-o*e-Nor. West. RaiL through 
Rugby and Tamworth to Lichfield, thence 4 miles: 
from Derby, tlirough Tamworth, &c., 28 miles. 
-eM»>Money orders issued at Lichfield: London 
letters deliv'- 8 a.m. : post closes 7 p.m.^*c>-The 
living (St. James), a vicarage in the diocese of 
Lichfield, is valued at £5. 5s. : pres. net income, 
£186: patron. Bishop of Lichfield: pres. incum- 
bent, S. Migendie, 1824: contains 4,860 acres: 
253 houses : pop''* in 1841, 1,183: probable pop*'- 
in 1849, 1,360: ass^- prop^- £6,673: poor rates in 
1838, £492. 8s. 

LONGDON, Staffobp, a township in the parish 
of Leeke — (which see for access, &c.): 156 miles 
from London, 2 from Leeke, 10 from Newcastle. 
-«>*e»Money orders issued at Leeke : London let- 
tors deliv^' 8i a.m. : post closes 5} p.m.-o«o-Con- 
tains 75 houses: pop"* in 1841, 405. 

LONGDON, WoRCESTEB, a parish in the lower 
division of the bun'* of Pershore, union of Upton- 
on-Sevem: 120 miles from London (coach road 
109), 3 from Upton-on -Severn, 6 from Tewkes- 
bury .-oM>Gt. West. Rail, through Swindon and 
Stonehouse to Tewkesbury, thence 6 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham to Tewkesbury, &c., 
98 miles.-oce-Money orders issued at Upton-on- 
Sevem : London letters deliv**- 8^ a.m. : post closes 
4J p.m.-««cs^The living (St. Mary), a yicarage, 
with the perpetual curacy of Castle-Morton an- 
nexed, in the archd'^- and diocese of Worcester, is 
valned at £14. 17s. 3id. : pres. net income, £448 : 
patron. Dean and Chapter of Westminster : pres. 
incumbent, C. Crewe, 1815 : contains 3,770 acres : 
131 houses: pop^- in 1841, 598: ass^ prop^- 
£4,012 : poor rates in 1838, £238. lOs. 

LONGDON-UPON-TERN, Salop, a parish in 
the Newport division of the hun^- of Bradford 
(South), union of Wellington, on the river Tern, 
and crossed by the Shrewsbury Canal : 160 miles 
from London (coach road 152), 3 from Shrewsbury, 
11 from Much- Wenlock. -3*<^ Nor. West RaiL 
through Wolverhampton to Shrewsbury, thence 3 
miles: from Derby, through Stafford to Shrews- 
bury, &Q., 75 miles. -oco^Money orders issued at 
Shrewsbury: London letters deliv*^- 9} a.m. : post 
closes 4^ p.m.-9M»The living is a donative in the 
diocese of Lichfield : pres.net income, £182: pa- 
tron, Duke of Sutherland: pres. incumbent, Ed- 
ward Meredith, 1846: contains 1,300 acres: 16 
houses: pop»- in 1841, 99: ass^- prop^- £1,328: 
poor rates in 1838, £19. 19b. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LONG EATON. See Eato» (Loko). 



LONGFIELD, Kent, a parish in the hun** of 
Axton-Dartford and Wilmington, lathe of Sutton- 
at-Hone, onion of Dartford : 22 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 20), 5 from Dartford, 5 from 
Grave8end.^»««^Norv Kent Rail, to Dartford, thence 
5 miles : from Derhy, through London, &c., 154 
milcs.-»»c^ Money orders issued at Dartford : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 9i a.m. : post closes 7^ p.m. 
-o«=»-The living (St. Mary Magdalene), a rectory 
in the diocese of Rochester, is valued at £5. 17s. 
6d. : pres. net income, £193: patron. Bishop of 
Bochester : pres. incumhent, James King, 1826 : 
contains 1,050 acres : 22 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
128: ass"*- prop^- £543: poor rates in 1838, £30. 
10s. 

LONGFLEET, Dorset, a tithing in the parish 
of Canford-Magna — (which see for access, &c.) : 
107 miles from London, 1 from Poole, 7 from 
Wimhome. -s>«o- Money orders issued at Poole : 
London letters deliv*** 7} a.m. : post closes 9 p.m. 
-o«:*The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese 
of Sarum : patron, Sir J. Guest : pres. incumhent, 
E. P. Blunt, 1844: contains 1,790 acres: 188 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,281: prohahle pop"* in 
1849, 1,473: ass^- prop^- £1,604: poor rates in 
1837, £469. 138. 

LONGFORD, Derby, a parish and township in 
the hun*- of Appletree, on a branch of the Dove : 
the parish comprises the townships of Alkmonton, 
Hollington, and Longford, the liberty of Hungry- 
Bentley, and the hamlet of Rodsley: 142 miles 
from London (coach road 136), 10 from Derby, 8 
from Uttoxeter. -«•<=- Nor. West. Rail, through 
Rugby to Derby, thence 10 miles: from Derby, 
by coach, 10 miles.-»»c^Money orders issued at 
Derby : London letters deKv*- lOj a.m. : post 
closes 7 p.m.-o*oThe church is a pleasing struc- 
ture, in the Norman style of architecture. Two 
of the schools here have been endowed by Lady 
Catherine Coke with lands, which produce £32 
per annum. Sir Robert Coke founded and en- 
dowed almshouses here for six poor persons, each 
of whom receives 2s. 6d weekly, besides £1 an- 
nually for a gown. The other charities produce 
about £2 a year.-o»o-The living (St. Chad), a rec- 
tory in the archd^- of Derby, and diocese of Lich- 
field, is valued at £3. 8s. 9d. : pres. net income, 
£260 : patron, Earl of Leicester : pres. incumbent, 
T. Gamier, jun., 1840: contains 3,920 acres: 207 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,249: probable pop"* in 
1849, 1,436: ass*- prop^- £9,228: poor rates in 
1837, £637. 18s. Tithes commuted in 1817. 

LONGFORD, Derbt, a township in the above 
parish — (which see for access, &c.)-o*»-Contains 
103 houses: pop"- in 1841, 616: ass**- prop^- 
£4,764: poor rates in 1837, £394. lis. 

LONGFORD, Gloucester, a hamlet in the par- 
ish of St. Catherine — (which see for access, &c.) : 
105 miles from London, 1 from Gloucester, 10 
from Tewkesbury. -o«c9- Money orders issued at 
Gloucester : London letters deliv*- 7} a.m. : post 
closes 9 p.m.-o«>Contains 200 acres : 30 houses : 
pop*^- in 1841, 170: ass*- prop^-, including Long- 
ford-St.-Mary, £2,652. 

LONGFORD (St. Mary), Gloucester, a ham- 
let in the parish of St. Mary de Lode : 3 miles 
from Bath.-<Mo-(For access and postal arrange- 
ments, see above.)-o»c-Contains 1,290 acres: 31 



houses: pop"* in 1841, 239: poor rates in 1838, 
£53. 16s. 

LONGFORD, Salop, a parish in the Newport 
division of the hun*- of Bradford (South), union ot 
Newport, crossed by a branch of the Birmingham 
and Liverpool Canal: 145 miles from London 
(coach road 140), 1 from Newport, 16 from Shrews- 
bury. -o«o- Nor. West. RaiL through Rugby and 
Stafford to Newport, thence 1 mile: from Derby, 
through Stafford, &c., 41 miles.-o^c^Money orders 
issued at Newport : London letters deliv*- 8 a.m. : 
post closes 4i p.m.-o«<»-The living (St. Mary), a 
rectory in the archd''- of Salop, and diocese of Lich- 
field, is valued at £6. 2s. 8i}d.: pres. net income, 
£415: patron, R. M. Leeke, Esq.: pres. incum- 
bent, J. K. Charlton, 1844: contains 1,310 acres: 
37 houses: pop"- in 1841, 209 : ass*- prop^- £3,017: 
poor rates in 1838, £76. 19s.-^c^Longford Hall 
is the seat of Ralph Merrick Leeke, Esq., the 
present head of a family which has, for several 
centuries, been of con!;idcrable importance in the 
county of Salop. Mr. Leeke's grandfather acquired 
a large property in the service of the East India 
Company, and was the contemporary and friend 
of Warren Hastings, Sir Thomas Metcalfe, Lord 
Teignmouth, and of other of the celebrated men of 
that day. He bought the Longford estate, which 
is now the property of his descendant. 

LANGHAM, Norfolk, a parish in the hun*- of 
Launditch, union of Mitford and Launditch : 130 
miles from London (coach road 102), 4 from "East 
Dereham, 9 from Swaffham.-<3«e»Nor. and East 
Co** Rail, through Ely to East Dereham, thence 4 
miles : from Derby, through Syston and Peter- 
borough to Dereham, &c., 150 miles.-ooo-Money 
orders issued at Dereham : London letters deliv"- 
8 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o*=-The living (St. 
Peter) is a perpetual curacy in the archd^- and 
diocese of Norwich : pres. net income, £30 : pa- 
tron. Lord Chancellor : pres. incumbent, R. Hew- 
lett, 1841 : contains 1,560 acres : 70 houses: pop"* 
in 1841, 333: ass*- prop^"- £938: poor rates in 
1838, £139. 38. 

LANGHAM, Dobset, a hamlet in the liberty of 
Westover, on the northern bank of the Stour : 99 
miles fipom London, 7 from Poole, 5 from Wim- 
bome. 

LONGHIRST. See Hubst (Long). 

LONGHOPE, Gloucester, a parish in the hon** 
of the duchy of Lancaster, union of Westbury-on- 
Sevem : 124 miles from London (coach road 114), 
5 from Newent, 9 from Gloucester.-o#o-Gt. West. 
Rail, through Stonehouse aiid Gloucester to Long- 
hope station : from Derby, through Birmingham, 
Gloucester, &c., 115 miles.-o»e^ Money orders is- 
sued at Gloucester : London letters deliv** 8^ a.m. : 
post closes 3^ p.m.-o«3^There is a Wesleyan Me- 
thodist chapel here. In the churchyard there is 
an inscription to the memory of Mr. Thos. Bright, 
who died in 1708, at the age of 124, and who, 
according to contemporary authorities, was, until 
within a short time of his death, in full possession 
of all his faculties.-o*3-The living, a disch*- vicar- 
age in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol, is 
valued at £9. 7s. ll^d. : pres. net income, £384: 
patrons. Archdeacon of Llandaff, and Rev. J. Pro- 
byn: pres. incumbent, R. N. Raikes, 1837: con- 
tains 2,970 acres: 170 houses: pop"- in 1841, 



929: aesfi- prop^* £3,425: poor rates in 1837, 
£234. l&B.^o«e-Longhope Hall is the seat of John 
IVobjn, Eaq., whose gnmdfather was twice high 
aheriff of Gloacestershire, and whose fiither was 
dean of Uandaff. Mr. Prohyn is a magistrate and 
depnty-lieotenant for the county. 

LONG HOBSLET. See Hobslbt (Loho). 

LONG HOUGHTON. See Houohtos (Lohg). 

LONGLEAT, Wilts, in the parish of DeTrill 
Longbridge : 100 miles from London, 4 from War- 
mioster, 4 from Frome.-a«>-There was formerly a 
prioiy of black canons here, which was attached 
to that of Henton in Somersetshire. The yenera- 
Ue bishop Ken spent much of his time at Longleat, 
and died here. He was horn at Berkhampstead 
m Hertfordshire, in 1637, and his conscientioas 
propriety of conduct found fayour eren with the 
lieestions Charles II., who made him his chaplain, 
and afterwards preferred him to the bishopric of 
Bsth and Wells. He opposed the endearours of 
Jamea II. to introduce popery into the country, 
and was one of the seven bishops sent to the 
Tower for resisting that monazoh's dispensing 
power. Dr. Ken was the author of soTOTal ser- 
mons, poems, and othor works. He died in 1711. 
At Longleat is the splendid domain of the Mar- 
quis of Bath. 

IX)NG M ABSTON. See Marstoh (Love) . 

LONGNEY, GuincKSTSB, a parish in the upper 
diriaion of the hun'* of Whitstone, union of 
Wheatenhurst, on the banks of the Severn, and 
in the line of the Gloucester and Berkeley Oanal : 
118 miles from London (coach road 111), 6 from 
Gloooester, 7 from Strond.«<Mo-Gt. West Rail. 
tlm>ogh Stonehonse to Gloucester, thence 6 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham to Gloucester, 
&c, 109 mile8."o«»-Money orders issued at Glou- 
oeater : London letters deliv^ 8} a.m. : post closes 
8| p.m. a<o T he parochial charities produce about 
£31 per an2ium.-«M».The living (St Lawrence), a 
▼ieanige in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol, is 
valued at £12. Is. 8d. : pres. net income, £100 : 
patron, Lord GhanceUcur! pres. incumbent, J. 
DanieU,18a5: contains 1,070 acres: 97 houses: 
popP- in 1841, 490: ass*** proper- £2,513: poor 
rates in 1838, £313. 2s. Tithes commuted in 
1812. 

LONGNOR, Saukp, a parish in the hun^ of Con- 
dover, union of Church-Stretton : 166 miles Itom 
Londoa (coach road 157), 9 from Shrewsbuiy, 9 
bom Much-Wenlock.-cMe>-Nor. West RaiL through 
Wdveriiampton to Shrewsbury, thence 9 miles: 
from Deriiy, through Staffind to Shrewsbary, &c., 
81 miles.-oK>*Money orders issued at Shrewsbury: 
London letters deltv'- 10} a.m. : post closes 3 p.m. 
-««»-There is a daily school here, which was en- 
dowed m 1764 by Sir Richard Corbett, who also 
left £70 for the encouragement of poor tradesmen 
in the ooonty, and for clothing six poor boys and 
the same number of girls in £e parishes of Long- 
nor, CSaidington, Leebotwood, and Frodisley. Five 
cottages here are occupied by poor persons, rent 
free; the other charities produce about £5. 10s. 
per annum.-eM>-The living is a perpetual curacy, 
annexed to that of Leebotwood: contains 1,200 
acres: 49 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 243: ass'- prop^* 
£1,557 : poor rates in 1838, £88. 2s.^»«o-Longnor 
Hi^ a fine brick mansion, agreeably situated in a 



vale, and commanding admirable views of Caer 
Caradoc and Lawley Hill, is the seat of Panton 
Corbett, Esq., a descendant of Sir Edward Corbett, 
who was created a baronet in 1642, but whose title 
expired in 1774. — Frodisley Lodge. 

LONGNOR, Stafford, a chapelry and market 
town in the parish of Alstonfield — (which see for 
access, &c.) — ^west of the river Dove : 161 miles 
from London, 10 from Leeke, 9 from Bakewell. 
"OMb-Money orders issued at Leeke: London letters 
deliv*' lOf^ a.m. : post closes 3i p.m.-o«<»-There is 
a Wesleyan Methodist chapel here.-o«e>The living, 
a perpetual curacy in the archd'^* of Stafford, is 
valued at £3: pres. net income, £150: patron, 
Vicar of Alstonfield : pres. incumbent, W. Buck- 
well, 1830: contains 850 acres: 94 houses: pop*^ 
in 1841, 485: ass<^ prop^- £818: poor rates in 
1838, £235.--»«>Market day, Tuesday. Fairs: 
Feb. 12, April 2, May 4, 17, 21, Aug. 5, Oct. 8, 
and Nov. 12. 

LONGPARISH, Hahts, a parish in the hnn^ of 
Wherwell, union of Andover, Andover division of 
the county: the parish contains the tithings of 
East and West Aston, Forton, and Middlcton : 63 
miles from London (coach road 60), 3 from Whit- 
church, 5 from Andover. -o«»- Sou. West. Rail, 
to the Andover Road station, thence 5 miles : from 
Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, and Reading, to 
Andover Road, &c, 152 miles, o mc Money orders 
issued at Whitchurch: London letters deliv^ 8 
a.m. : post closes 7} p.m.-*9«o-There is a Baptist 
chapel here.-'Mo-The living (St. Nicholas), a disch^* 
vicarage in the archd^* and diocese of Winchester, 
is valued at £8 : pres. net income, £226 : patron. 
Rev. H. Woodcock : pres. incumbent, H. B. Greene, 
1821: contains 4,320 acres: 153 houses: pop**- in 
1841, 811: ABB^ props'* £4,283: poor rates in 
1837, £593. 18s.^o«c^LongpariBh Hall is the seat 
of Colonel Hawker. — Middleton House is the seat 
of Henry Beaumont Coles, Esq., lord of the manor. 

LONGPORT, Kbkt, a portion of the city of 
Canterbury, commonly called a borough, in the 
parish of St. Paul.xMo-Contains 179 houses : pop*' 
in 1841, 1,179. 

LONG PRESTON. See PBE8Tt)N (Long). 

LONGRIDGE, Dcrham, a township in the par- 
ish of Norham — (which see for access, &c.) — <li8- 
trict of Norhamshire : 338 miles from London, 4 
from Berwick, 10 from Cold8tream.-o»o-Money or- 
ders issued at Berwick : Londob letters dcliv^* 8} 
a.m. : post closes 6 p.m.-e«o- Contains 470 acres: 
18 houses: pop»- in 1841,68: ass«>- prop^- £817 : 
poor rates in 1838, £34. 178. 

LONGRIDGE, Lakoaster, a chapelry in tho 
parish of Ribchester — (which see for access, &c.) : 
215 miles from London, 8 from Preston, 6 from 
BUckbum.-c«e» There are some celebrated stone 
quarries in the chapelry. -o«e>The living, a per- 
petual curacy in the ^ocese of Manchester, is 
valued at £4. 138. 4d. : pres. net income, £170: 
patron, Hulmc's Trustees: pres. incumbent, W. C. 
Bache. — (Pop"* returned with the parish.) -o«<=- 
Fairs : May 13, and Nov. 6. 

L0NGSHAW8, Nobthdmbbrlakd, a township 
in the parish of Long Horslcy — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.) : 295 miles from London, 6 from Mor- 
peth, 9 from Rothbury.-«»«>-M()ney orders issued at 
Morpeth: London letters deliv^- 12^ p.m. : post 



Toum. 



LON 



114 



LON 



closes 1 p.m.'ove-Contains 8 honses: pop"* in 1841, 
48: poor rates in 1838, £11. 13s. 

LONG SLEDDALE. See Slbddalb (Lono). 

LONGSTOCK, Hants, a parish in the hnn'- of 
King's Sombourne, union of Stockhridge, Andover 
division of the county, on the river Test, and 
crossed by the Andover Canal : 72 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 66), 2 from Stockbridge, 6 from 
Andover. -o«>- Son. West. Bail, to the Andover 
Boad station, thence 14 miles: from Derby, 
through Rugby, Oxford, and Reading, to Andover 
Road, &c., 161 mile8.-<3«c*-Money orders issued at 
Stockbridge : London letters deliv^* 7} a.m. : post 
closes 7 p.m.-o*e^The parochial charities produce 
about £15 a year. -o«c-- The living (the Virgin 
Mary), a disch^- vicarage in the archd^- and dio- 
cese of Winchester, is valued at £10. 15s. : pros, 
net income, £285: patron. Rev. Sir J. B. Mill, 
Bart. : pres. incumbent, W. B. Drewe, 1849 : con- 
tains 2,610 acres : 89 houses: pop"- in 1841, 497 : 
ass*- propy- £3,337 : poor rates ih 1837, £320. 6s. 
-«Mo^Longstock Park is the scat of William Etwall, 
Esq. 

LONGSTONB (G^at) with HOLME, Dekby, 
a chapelry in the parish of Bakewell — (which see 
for access, &c.) : 157 miles from London, 4 from 
Bakewell, 10 from Buxton.*eM>-Money orders is- 
sued at Bakewell : London letters deliv*^ 9 a.m. : 
post closes 4} p.m.-e>M>-One of the schools here is 
endowed with £20 per annum; the other charities 
produce about £25 per annum.-oM»-The living hi 
a perpetual cnracy in the diocese of Lichfield: 
pres. net income, £180 : patron, Vicar of Bake- 
well: pres. incumbent, J. S. Hodson, 1846: con- 
tains 100 houses: pop"- in 1841, 695: ass'*- prop'* 
£2,861 : poor rates in 1837, £125. 5s. Tithes, 
vicarial and small, commuted in 1810. 

LONGSTONE (Little), Derby, a township in 
the parish of Bakewell : 156 miles from London, 
3 from Bakewell, 4 from Tideswell.-ew>-(For access 
and postal arrangements, see above.)-oK:^Contains 
26 houses: pop"- in 1841, 174: ass*^ propy-£804: 
poor rates in 1838, £31. 7s. 

LONGSTOW, Cambridge, a parish in the above 
huu^-, union ofOaxton and Arrington: 68 mUes 
from London (coach road 48), 1 from Caxton, 1 1 
from Cambridge.-o«c>-Nor. and East. Co** Rail, to 
Cambridge, thence 11 miles : from Derby, through 
Syston and Peterborough to Cambridge, &c., 137 
miIe3.-oM>>Money orders issued at Caxton : Lon- 
don letters deliv^- 7j^ a.m. : post closes 7} p.m. 
-©•o-The living, a rectory in the archd'^* and dio- 
cese of Ely, is valued at £4. 8s. 4d. : patron. Rev. 
H. HoUoway: contains 1,412 acres: 37 houses: 
pop" in 1841, 276: ass*- propy-£ 1,423: poor rates 
in 1838, £132. 14s.-o.c^L<mgstow HaU. 

LONG-STREET, Wilto, a tithing in the parish 
of Endford : 79 miles from London, 8 from Lud- 
gershall, 7 from Ameabury.-*Mo-Tithe8 commuted 
in 1805. 

LONG SUTTON. See Sutton (Lokq). 

LONGTHORPE, Northampton, a chapelry on 
the northern bank of the Nen, in the parish of St. 
John the Baptist, liberty of Peterborough — (which 
see for access, &c.) : 83 miles from London, 2 from 
Peterborough, 10 fi*om Stamford.-o«o-Money orders 
issued at Peterborough : London letters deliv*^ 7^ 
a.m. : post closes 9 p.m.^o«>The living is a curacy, 



annexed to the vicarage of Peterborough : oontains 
1,390 acres: 63 houses: pop"- in 1841, 251. 

LONGTON, Lancastkx, a chapelry in the parish 
of Penwortham — (which see for access, &c.) — on 
the banks of the Kibble : 217 miles from London, 
5 from Preston, 12 from Orm8kirk.-o*s-Moriey or- 
ders issued at Preston : London letters deliir- 8| 
a.m. : post closes 5^ p.m.-e«^One of the schools 
here is endowed wi^ £30 per annum ; the other 
charities produce about £17. 10s. per annum. 
There is a Wesleyan Methodist chapel here. q^e . 
The living, a perpetual curacy in the diocese of 
Manchester, is valued at £14 : pres. net income, 
£148 : pHtron, L. Rawstome, Esq. : pres. incumr 
bent, R. A. Rawstome, 1831 : contains 2,970 acres: 
303 houses: pop^ in 1841, 1,719: probable popl- 
in 1849, 1,974: ass^ prop^^* £4,404: poor rates in 
1837, £450. 188. 

LONGTON. See Lanc-End wttb Lonoton. 

LONGTOWN, Cumberland, a small market 
town in the parish of Arthuret, ward of Eskdale, 
on the banks of the Esk, near its confluence with 
the Liddel: 311 miles from London (coach road 
310) , 9 from Carlisle, 20 from Wigton.^o«e^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Rugby ,.Crewe, Lancaster, and 
Carlisle, to Gretna Junction station, thence 3 miles: 
from Derby, through Crewe, Carlisle, &c., 211 
miles.-<»*»-Money orders issued at Carlisle : London 
letters deliv^- 12^ p.m.: post closes 1 p.m.-«Me>- 
Most of the houses are neat modem erections, and 
the streets are regular and spacious ; the market 
was established in the time of Henry IIL Most 
of the working inhabitants are employed in weav- 
ing linen. The petty sessions for the division are 
hcdd here, and the poor-law commissioners have 
erected a' workhouse for the district. The Long- 
town poor-law union comprises fourteen parishes, 
with a population of about 10,000 persons.-oM*- 
Contains 331 honses: pop"- in 1841, 1,990: prob- 
able pop*^ in 1849, 2,288 : ass*^ prop^- £2,208.^««^ 
Market day, Thursday. Fairs : Thursday befote 
Whitsunday, horses ; Sept. 30, cattle. 

LONGTOWN, Hereford, a chapelry on the 
river Monnow, in the parish of Ciodock — (which 
see for access, &c.) — hun*^ of Ewyas-Lacy: 150 
miles from London, 17 from Hereford, 14 from 
Hay.-o«»-Money orders issued at Hereford : Lon- 
don letters deliv'- 11^ a.ra. : post closes 12^ p.m. 
•<3«»-The living, a peirpetual curacy in the diocese 
of St. David's, is valued at £16 : pres. net income, 
£68 : patron. Vicar of Ciodock : pres. incumbent, 
Edmund Davis, 1849: contains 170 honses: pop*- 
in 1841, 869: ass<^ props'- £3,738: poor rates in 
1837, £365. 19s. 

LONGWITTON, Northidibebland, a township 
in the parish of Haitbum — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 299 miles from London, 10 from Morpeth, 9 
from Rothbury.-o«> Money orders issued at Mor- 
peth: London letters deliv^- 1^ p.m.: post doses 
at noon, ■ a to Contains 23 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
135 : poor rates in 1838, £42. ls.~(Other returns 
with the parish.) 

LONGWOOD, West Riding, York, a chapelry 
in the parish of HuddersBeld — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.) — upper division of the wapentake of 
Agbrigg: 193 miles from London, 4 from Hud- 
dersfield, 7 from Halifax.-o«e>Money orders issued 
at Hnddersfield: London letters deliv^ 10 a.m.: 



post closes 5 p.in.-aM>^ne of the schools here vrtm 
endowed by Willuim Walker, Esq., with the rents 
sod piofito of aa estate which now produce ahoat 
£120 per annnm ; the other charities produce about 
£5. 10s. per aQiinm.-o«^The living (Bt. Mark's) 
is s perpetual curacy in the diocese of Btpon : pres. 
net income, £150: patron, Vicar of Huddersfield: 
pKs. incumbent, W. G. Gibson, 1847 : contains 
910 tores: 380 houses: pop'- in 1841, 2,418: 
IHobftUe pop"- in 1849, 2,781 : poor rates in 1838, 
£238. 179. Tithes commuted in 1814. 

LONG WORTH, Buas, a parish in the hun<i>- of 
Gsnfield and Ock, union of Farringdon, south of 
the Thames: the parish indudies the chapelry of 
Chiniey, and the hamlet of Dtaycott-Moore : 64 
miles horn Iiondon, 7 from farringdon, 10 from 
Ozfoid.^o*e^Gt. West. Bail, to Abingdon Road 
station, thence 8 miles: ftom Derby, through 
Ragby and Oxford to Abingdon Road, &c, llO 
miles. -««»> Honey orders issued at Farringdon: 
London letters dieliy^ 9 a.m. : post closes 7 pjn. 
-«*c».This parish has the privilege of sending fire 
boys to SB endowed school at Kingston-Bagpuse ; 
the other charities produce about £36. 15s. per 
aiumm.-ew>.The living, a rectory in the diocese of 
Oxford, is Talued at £27. Is. lOd. : pres. net in- 
oome, £632 : patron, Jesus College, Oxford : pres. 
incnmbent, O. Jenkins, 1841 ; contains 4,640 acres: 
208 houses: pop°* in 1841, 1,063: probable popl- 
in 1849, 1,222 : ass^ piop^- £6,252 : poor rates in 
1838, £478. 6s. 

LONGWORTH, Laxoaater, a township in the 
pariih of Bolton — (which see for access, &c.) : 202 
miles from London, 5 from Great Bolton, 7 from 
Blackburn. 3 « c . Money orders issued at Bolton : 
London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-*Mo-Gontains 1,590 acres: 28 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 149: ass"^ piop^- £545: poor rates m 1838, 
£94. 

LOOK (EiASt), Cobkwall, a chapelry, and an 
laeisnt but disfiranchised borough, market town, 
tnd seaport, on the northern bank of tiie river 
Looe, at its efflux into the English Channel, in the 
pariili of St. Martin: 258 miles from London 
(cosch toad 234), 8 from Liskeard.«e«o^Gt. West, 
fiafl. through Bristol and Exeter to Plymouth, 
thence 14 miles : from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Bristol, &c., 272 miles. *» e. Money orders 
nmedatLiskeard: London letters deliv^- 2 p.m.: 
post closes 8^ p.m.-««e»£ast Looe formerly returned 
two members to parliament, but the franchise was 
destroyed by the Reform Act. The general impor- 
tanee of the place was at one time much greater 
than at present, the town having been erected into 
a bofoo^ as early as the reign of Henry II., at 
the instance cf Henry de Bodmgan,.who was then 
knd of the manor. In the rmgn ol Edward III. 
it sent 20 ships or galleys, wifii 315 mariners, to 
the siege of Calais, and was at that time the only 
ieaport of importance, except Fowey, in ail Com- 
waU. The town is chiefly built on a flat piece of 
Isnd, bounded by the river on the west, and the 
sea on the south. The inhabitants are now chiefly 
employed in the pilchard flshery, but formerly 
there was a ooosideEahle trade carried on with the 
lfe£ten«nean, Fxanee, and Spain; the only rem- 
aanfa of tiiis business are an inconsiderable coast- 
ing trade. The exports consist of tin, copper, and 



lead, timber, salt flsh, and bark ; the chief imports 
are of salt, coal, and limestone. The port is de- 
fended by a small battery and breastwork. The 
town consists of several small narrow streets, 
which, from their position, assume a very pictu- 
resque aspect, being surrounded by high and steep 
acclivities, most of which are beautified by terraced 
gardens. The parochial charities, for the size of 
the phice, are numerous and important. In 1716, 
Sir Jonathan Trelawney, at one time bishop of 
Exeter, and afterwards of Winchester, left £2,000, 
of the proceeds of which four-tenths were to be 
paid to a clergyman for reading prayers every day, 
and preaching a sermon on Sundays ; the remain- 
der was to be applied to educational purposes. 
Speecot*s and Buller's schools are endowed with 
£60 per annum, £30 of which are applied to teach- 
ing the poor children of the county mathematics 
and navigation, and the other £30 is used in 
teaching reading, writing, and accounts. The 
other charities produce about £4 a ycar.^^M^The 
living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Exe- 
ter: pres. net income, £40: patron, Bishop of 
Exeter: contains 154 houses : pop"- in 1841, 926 : 
ass*- propy- £920: poor rates in 1838, £98. Ss. 
-s>»o-Market day, Saturday.-«>*oShip and ^ Swan 
Inns. • 

LOOE, CoRirwALL, a chapelry, and an ancient 
but disfranchised borough, on the western bank of 
the river Looe, in the parish of Talland: 234 
miles from London, 16 from Plymouth, 9 from 
Fowey .-«3««*- (For access and postal an-angements, 
see above. )-oK>-This was at one time a market 
town, but the market, which was held on a Satur- 
day, has for some time been discontinued; but 
there is still a small harbour, which is defended by 
a battery of ten guns, on the beach. The name of 
Port-Pigham was given to West Looe, from a manor, 
now annexed to the duchy of Cornwall, and held 
on lease from th^ crown by the corporation. I'his 
place had returned two members to parliament 
ever since the reign of Edward VI., till it was dis- 
franchised by the Reform Act. It is connected 
with East Looe by an old bridge over the river. 
The chapel fell into ruins, but was repaired, and 
converted into a guild-hall. Tlie Independents 
have a chapel here. General Trelawney left £4 a 
year to the parish.*-o»c^ Contains 120 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 616: ass*^* prop^- £565: poor rates in 
1838, £51. 12s.-<>^Fair, May 6. 
. LOOSE, Kent, a parish in the hun^ of Maid- 
stone, lathe of Aylesford, union of Maidstone : 49 
miles from London (coach road 37), 3 from Maid- 
stone, 11 from Cranbrook.-cMoSou. East. Rail, to 
Maidstone, thence 3 miles : from Derby, through 
London, &c., 181 milos.-«>«e>-Money orders issued 
at Maidstone : London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post 
closes 8 p.m. -oM>> There are several paper and 
com mills in the parish, twelve of which have 
their wheels driven by a small stream, within the 
space of three miles ; there are also some exten- 
sive tanning and fulling establishmeuts. Hops 
are largely cultivated in the district. o«c The 
living (All Saints) is a perpetual curacy, in the 
diocese of Canterbury ; not in charge : pres. net 
income, £492 : patron. Archbishop of Canterbury : 
pi^s. incumbent, William Elwyn, 1816: contains 
1,220 acres: 213 houses: pop""- in 1841, 1,416: 



probable pop"- in 1849, 1,628: ass*- prop^- £3,204: 
poor rates in 1837, £218. 48. 

LOPEN, SoMEBSBT, a parish in the soathem 
division of the hnn*^* of Petherton, union of Chard: 
181 miles from London (coach road 131), 3 from 
Crewkerne, 5 from ]lmin8ter.-a«»>Gt. We.st. Bail, 
through Bristol and Taunton, thence 18 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 
195 miles.-oM» Money orders issued at Crewkerne : 
London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 3^ p.m. 
-o«e>^The living (All Saints) is a perpetual curacy 
in the archd'* of Taunton, and diocese of Bath 
and Wells: pres. net income, £77: patron, Earl 
Poulett: pres. incumbent, A. Templeman, 1835: 
contains 470 acres : 107 houses : pop°- in 1841 , 
506: tLBB^ propy- £1,418: poor rates in 1838, 
£182. 10s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LOPHAM (North or Maoha), Norfolk, a par- 
ish in the hun*^* and union of Guiltcross: 103 
miles from Loudon (coach road 89), 5 from EUist 
Harling, 11 from Thetford.<««o^East. Co"- Rail, to 
Diss, thence 8 miles : from Derby, through Sys- 
ton and Peterborough to Thetford, 135, thence 11 
mile8.-oK>.Money orders issued at Thetford : Lon- 
don letters deliv'- 9} a.m. : post closes 5} p.m. 
-o«e»Hemp, which is largely grown in the neigh- 
bourhood, is here manufactured, affording, large 
employment to the inhabitants. There is a Wes- 
leyan chapel here. The charities produce about 
£100 per annum, which is applied to parochial 
purposes.-eM»>'The living (St. Andrew) , a rectory, 
with that of South Lopham, in the archd^- of Nor- 
folk, and diocese of Norwich, is valued at £17. Os. 
5d. : pres. net income, £619 : patron, St. John's 
College, Cambridge : pres. incumbent, J. Barrow, 
1823: contains -2,200 acres: 120 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 815: ass<L prop^"- £2,852: poor rates in 
1838, £457. 8s. 

LOPHAM (SouTfl or Farva), Norfolk, a parish 
in the hun*^- and union of Guiltcross : 88 miles 
from London, 6 firom Botesdale.-««»-(For access 
and postal arrangem€nts, see above.) o»o The 
charities produce about £127 per annum, most of 
which is applied to parochial purpo8es.-««c>^The 
living (St. Nicholas) is a rectory, not in charge, 
unit^ to that of Lopham-Magna : contains 2,180 
acres: 105 houses: pop"- in 1841, 724: ass^props^' 
£2,850 : poor rates in 1838, £620. 19s. 

LOPPINGTON, Salop, a parish in the hun*- of 
Fimhill, union of Wem, on the river Roden : 168 
miles from London (coach road 166), 3 from Wem, 
12 from Shrewsbury .-o«o^Nor. West. Rail, through 
Wolverhampton to Shrewsbury, thence 11 miles: 
from Derby, through Stafford to Shrewsbury, &c., 
83 miles.->Mo-Money orders issued at Shrewsbury : 
London letters deliv^- 10 a.m. : post closes 2} p.m. 
-oMi^llie Wesleyan Methodists have a place of wor- 
ship here. The charities produce about £7 per 
annum.-o»«^The living (St. Mary), a disch*- vicar- 
age in the archd^* of Sidop, is valued at £6. 128. 
Id. : pres. net income, £270 : patron. Lord Chan- 
cellor: pres. incumbent, W. Thomas, 1841: con- 
tains 4,600 acres: 121 houses: pop"- in 1841, 612: 
ass*^- propJ"- £4,921 : poor rates in 1838, £175. 15s. 
-e«»- Loppington House is the seat of Thomas 
Dicken, Esq. 

LORBOTTLE, Northumberland, a township in 
the parish of Whittingham — (which see for access, 



&c.): 306 miles from London, 11 from Alnwick, 
4 fh>m Rothbury.-o«o.Money orders issued at Aln- 
wick: London letters deliv^- 3 p.m.: poftt doses 
lOi p.m. -«*e- Contains 21 houses: pop*- in 1841, 
114: poor rates in 1837, £37. lOs. 

LORTON, CuMBERLAHD, a parochial chapelry in 
the parish of Brigham — (whidi see for access, &c.) 
— ward of Allerdale, above Derwent, on the river 
Cocker: it includes the townships of Brackenthwaite 
and Lorton, and the chapelry of Wythop: 301 
miles from London, 4 from Ck)ckermouth, 8 firom 
Ke8wick.^*a«e»-Money orders issued at Cockermonth : 
London letters deliv^ 1 p.m. : post closes 11^ a.m. 
o<o The living (St. Cuthbert), a perpetual curacy 
in the archd^- of Richmond, and diocese of Chester, 
is valued at £7: pres. net income, £76: patron, 
Earl of Lonsdale : pres. incumbent, W. Armistead, 
1826: contains 13,960 acres: 123 houses: popl- 
in 1841, 635: ass**' prop^* £3,561: poor rates in 
1837, £347. 48. Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LORTON, CnicBERLAino, a township in the above 
parish.^«>«»^(For access and postal arrangements, 
see above. )<-e«»>Contains 76 houses : pop"- in 1841, 
446: ass"^ prop^- £1,804: poor rates in 1837, 
£183. 19b. 

LOSCOE. See Codkor with Losoow. 

LOSCOMBE, Dorset, a hamlet in the parish of 
Netherbnry — (which see for access, &o.) 

LOSELEY, SuRRBT, a hamlet in the parish of 
St. Nicholas, Guildford — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 30 miles from London, 2 from Guildford, 2 
firom Godalming. 

LOSENHAM, Kbrt, a hamlet in the parish of 
Newenden, lathe of Scray — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 4 miles from Tendering. 

LOSTOCK, Laroaster, a hamlet in the parish 
of Bolton — (which see for access, &c.) : 201 miles 
from London, 5 firom Bolton, 4 firom Wigan. oto 
Money orders issued at Bolton : London letters 
deliv**' 9 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. o»o There are 
the remains here of a very large mansion, caUed 
Lostock Hall, which was built about the year 
1563 : the royal arms, with the date of 1590, are 
placed over the highest oriel window. It is chiefly 
a lath and plaster building, and a fine specimen oi 
the domestic architecture of the period; most of 
the rooms are wainscoted with massy panels. The 
gateway is of stone, and resembles the style of the 
schools at Oxford, obo Contains 1,170 acres: 102 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 625: ase!^ prop^^* £1,668: 
poor rates in 1837, £162. 28. Tithes oommnted 
in 1839. 

LOSTOCK (or Lostock-Gealax), CnEflrrBR, a 
township in the parish of Great Bndworth — (which 
see for access, &c.): 173 miles from London, 2 
from Northwich, 5 firom Knntsford. •«•»- Money 
orders issued at Northwich : London letters deliv^ 
7} a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-«*o.The Grand Trunk 
Canal passes westward of the village. -«m>. The 
living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ches- 
ter: pres. net income, £50: patron. Incumbent of 
Witton: pres. incumbent, G. Bewsher, 1846: con- 
tains 1,630 acres: 93 houses: pop"- in 1841, 374: 
as8<^ prop3^- £2,164 : poor rates in 1838, £137. 198. 

LOSTWITHIEL, Coritwall, a parish, borough, 
and market town, in the eastern division of the 
hun'- of Powder, union of Bodmin : 258 miles finom 
London (coach road 234), 7 firom Bodmin.-*»o-Gt 



LOS 



117 



LOU 



West. BaiL throngh Bristol and Exeter tc Ply- 
moath, thence 14 miles: from Derby, throngh 
Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 272 miles. -^a^s- Money 
orders issued here: London letters deliy^- 12.50 
p.m. : post closes 8} a.m. -om>^ This place is sup- 
posed by some authorities to hare been the Bo- 
man station, called Uzella by Ptolemy ; but few, 
if any, Boman remains haye been discovered on 
its site or in the neighbourhood. Its name is be- 
Uered to have been derived from its having been 
the residence of Wethiel, anciently an Earl of 
Gomwall, who had a palace at Penknight, within 
the district of the present borough, but which 
DOW forms part of the parish of Lanbevery. In 
the reign of Bichard I. the town was held by 
Bobert de Cardmam, who procured for it the grant 
of a market; and Bichard, Earl of Cornwall, brother 
of Henry III., made this, with Penknight, a free 
borough. His son Edmond, besides several other 
privileges, granted that Lostwithiel should be made 
one of the places for taking the coinage of tin in 
ComwalL In the summer of 1644, the town was 
the head-quarters of the Eari of Essex, the princi- 
pal parliamentary general, who had established 
himself here in consequence of a defeat of the 
royalists under Sir Bichard Greville, by Lord Bo- 
bartes, in the immediate neighburhood. Dugdale 
asserts that the church was profaned by the sol- 
diery, and defaced by an explosion of gunpowder. 
Lostwithiel is pleasantly situated in a beautiful 
vale, on the banks of the river Fowey, on the high- 
way from London to Falmouth — the river, which is 
crossed by a bridge, being navigable for barges as 
far as the quay during spring-tides. The town 
consists chiefly of two parall^ streets, which ex- 
tend from the river to the foot of a steep hill ; it is 
lighted and paved, and there is a good supply of 
water. The houses are chiefly built of stone, and 
eovered with slate, which abounds in the neigh- 
bourhood. The trade of the place consists chiefly 
in the importation of coal, timber, and other arti- 
cles, for the miners in the interior — some of the 
mines in the environs being among the most 
valuable and important in the county, diffusing, 
when in active work, wealth and prosperity through 
the neighbourhood. The church is a handsome 
edifice, in the early English style, with a lantern 
tower at the west end, surmounted by a fine octa- 
gonal spire, erected in the fourteenth century ; it 
contains an ancient stone font, on the sides of 
which are sculptured grotesque figures and armorial 
bearings, now much defaced. The town-hall is 
a neat building, erected in 1740, at the expense of 
the Earl of Mount-Edg^umbe. A charter of in- 
corporation was granted to Lostwithiel by James 
I. in 1623, and renewed by George 11. in 1738, 
under which the corporation consists of seven 
aldermen or capital burgesses, including the mayor 
and seventeen assistants or common councllmen — 
I the mayor, the late mayor, and the recorder, being 
Justices of the peace. A court-leet is held annu- 
ally, when presentments are made to the mayor 
respecting the borough and the river, and all per- 
sons having boats upon the river are required to 
render suit and service to this court. The borough 
first returned members to parliament in the thirty- 
third year of Edward I., and then ceased until the 
fourth year of Edward II., from which time the 



returns were made regularly until the second of 
William IV., when the place was entirely disfran- 
chised. The Independents and Wesleyan Metho- 
dists have chapels here. A free grammar-school 
wr.B established in 1776, by the corporation, who 
gave the master a salary of £50 per annum. Two 
other schools have small endowments. About a 
mile northward of the town, on a lofty ridge, are 
the magnificent and venerable ruins of Bestormal 
Castle, supposed to have been erected by Bobert, 
Earl of Mortaigne, and which was anciently the 
residence of the Earls of Cornwall. Until his 
troops were defeated, it was occupied by Sir Bichard 
Greville during the civil war. -o«c»- The living (St. 
Bartholomew), a disch*^* vicarage in the archd^- of 
Cornwall, and diocese of Exeter, is valued at £2. 
13s. 4d. : pres. net income, £96 : patron, Earl of 
Mount-Edgcumbe : pres. incumbent, John Bower, 
1816: contains 120 acres: 282 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 1,186: probable pop»- in 1849, 1,364: ass*- 
propy- £1,498: poor rates in 1838, £383. lid. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. -o«e> Bankers: Bobins, 
Foster, & Co. — draw on Williams, Deacon, & Co. 
-<9«o.Inns : Talbot and King's Arms. 

LOTHEBS. See Lodebs. 

LOTHEBSDEN(orLoTHERSDALiE),WESTBiDnro, 
ToRKSHiRB, a manor in the parish of Carleton.-«>M». 
The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of 
Bipon: pres. net income, £100 : patron, the Vicar: 
pres. incumbent, J. Holdsworth, 1 848. 

LOTHEBTON, West Bidino, Yoiik, a township 
in the parish of Sherbum — (which see for access, 
&c.) — upper division of the bun**- of Barkston-Ash : 
the parish includes part of Aberford: 183 miles 
from London, 6 from Tadcaster, 4 from Sherbum. 
-o«»- Money orders issued at Tadcaster: London 
letters deliv'* 9 a.m.: post closes 4} p.m.^o«»^The 
living is a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Sher- 
bum: contains 1,010 acres: 97 houses: pop*^' in 
1841, 664: ass*"- prop^- £1,134: poor rates in 1838, 
£102. 158. lathes commutetl in 1839. 

LOUDWATEB, Buckingham, a cliapelry in the 
parish of High Wycombe — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 26 miles from London, 3 from High Wy- 
combe, 3 from Beaconsfield. -o«o- Money orders is- 
sued at High Wycombe : London letters deliv^- 8 
a.m. : post closes 7^ p.m. ■o*c» The living is a per- 
petual curacy in the diocese of Oxford : pres. net 
income, £132: patron, Trustees of W. Davis: 
pres. incumbent, Edward Arnold, 1841. 

LOUGHBOBOUGH, Leicester, a parish and 
market town in the hun*'- of Goscote, union of 
Loughborough, intersected by the Loughborough 
Canal, which communicates betwixt the Union Canal 
and the Soar: the parish, which has recently been 
divided into two separate and distinct parishes, 
contains, beside the town of Loughborough, the 
township of Knightthorpe and the hamlet of Wood- 
thorpe: 116 miles from London (coach road 109), 
11 from Leicester.-*=>«e>-Nor. West. Bail, through 
Bugby and Leicester to Ix>ugh borough sta- 
tion : from Derby, through Kegworth, 16 miles. 
-«*e-Money orders issued here: London letters 
deliv*^ Si a.m. and 3i p.m. : post closes 7 a.m. 
and 10 p.m.^oM»>Loughborough, in point of im- 
poi'tanc^, has always been considered as the second 
town in the county, being situated in a beautiful 
country, and consisting of a number of handsome 



fitreets, paved, and lighted with gas. During the 
last few years it has been remarkably improyed, 
and the market-place now forms a fine oblong 
area, surrounded by good houses and elegant 
shops. The principal manufactures are those 
of the whole of the towns of that district, of 
worsted and cotton hosiery, with cotton goods, 
bobbin-net, lace, and fabrics of mohair. The en- 
closure and cultivation of a portion of Chamwood 
forest, has lately contributed much to the advan- 
tage of the town. A new church has been erected 
by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The Inde- 
pendents, Presbyterians, Wesleyan and Primitive 
Methodists, all have chapels here, as also have the 
Society of Friends, Unitarians, and Roman Catholics. 
Loughborough enjoys the advantage of an excel- 
lent library and news-room ; it has also a theatre. 
Four of the schools here are supported by endow- 
ments, which arise from lands bequeathed for that 
purpose by Mr. Thomas Burton: these several 
schools are held in separate apartments in one 
building, which was erected in 1829, at an expense 
of £1,500. The whole income derived from Bur- 
ton's charity amounts to about £1,450 a year, of 
which about £400 is applied in support of the 
schools, and the rest is expended on parochial ob- 
jects. The other charities produce about £420 
per annum, of which a considerable portion is laid 
out in clothing and apprenticing poor children. 
Dispensaries, and other urban institutions for the 
relief of the poor, are numerous. A court-leet and 
baron is held here annually, by the lord of the 
manor, at which constables, third-boroughs, as 
they are called, street-masters, field-reeves, and 
other officers, are appointed for the municipal go- 
vernment of the town. A workhouse has been 
erected here, which is capable of accommodating 
350 persons. The Loughborough poor-law union 
comprises 24 parishes, with a population of about 
25,000 persons, spread over an area of 65 square 
miles.-o»c=-The living (St. Peter and St. Paul), a 
rectory, formerly in the archd^' of Leicester, and 
diocese of Lincoln, now in the diocese of Peter- 
borough, is valued at £40. 13s. 3d.: pres. net in- 
come, £1,000: patron, Emanuel College, Cam- 
bridge: pres. incumbent, Henry Fearon, 1848: 
contains 5,460 acres : 2,176 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
10,170: probable pop"- in 1849, 11,695: ass^- 
propJ^- £21,278: poor rates in 1838, £2,214. 6s. 
Tithes commuted in 1759.-o*o- Market day, Thurs- 
day. Fairs : Feb. 14, March 24 and 28, April 25, 
Holy Thursday, Aug. 12, Se^ft. 30, Nov. 13, cattle. 
-e«»-Bankers : Middieton & Cradock — draw on 
Bamett, Hoares, & Co. ; Pagets & Rirby (open on 
market days) — draw on Glyn, Halifax, & Co.; 
Branch of Pare's Leicestershire Banking Co. — 
draw on Smith, Payne, & Co. ; Branch of Notting- 
ham & Notts Banking Co. — draw on London and 
Westminster Bank.^9«o- Inns: King's Head, Bull's 
Head and Anchor, Red Lion, and Black Horse. 

LOUGHBOROUGH, Leicestebshibe, a town 
in the above parish.^3«<»-(For access and postal 
arrangements, see above.) -om»> Contains 4,370 
acres: 2,146 houses: pop""- in 1841, 12,420: ass*>- 
propy- £18,544. 

LOUGH BRIGG. See Rydal and Loughbbioo. 

LOUGHOR. See Llouoiior. 

LOUGHTON, BucKiNGUAM, a parish in the 



bun*- of Newport, union of Newport-Pagncll, on « 
branch of the Ouse : 50 miles from London (coach 
road 49), 4 from Fenny-Stratford, 5 from Newport- 
Pagnell.^»*c.-Nor. West. Rail, to Bletchley, theace 
4 miles : from Derby, through Rugby to Bletchley, 
&c., 94 miles.-<3«o Money orders issued at Fenny- 
Stratford : London letters deliv^' 8 a.m. : poai 
closes 8 p.m.-3«s^There is a small Baptist chapel 
here, and two small charities, one of which is ap- 
plied in the distribution of coals to the poor, and 
the other in apprenticing poor children, <wo The 
living (All Saints), a rectory in the diocese of Ox- 
ford, is valued at £14. 5s. 2^d. : pres. net income, 
£228: patron. Trinity College, Cambridge: pres. 
incumbent, J. Athawes, 1833: contains 1,620 
acres : 74 houses : pop"- in 1841 , 361 : ass'- prop''* 
£2,031: poor rates in 1837, £152. 28. Tithes, 
moduses, &c., commuted in 1768. 

LOUGHTON, Essex, a parish in the hun^ of 
Ongar, union of Epping, ^est of the Roding: 16 
miles from London (coach road 12), 4 from Epping. 
-o*e-Nor. and East. Co'- Rail, to Pondcrs-End, 
thence 4 miles : from Derby, through London, &c.« 
148 mile8.-o«o^Two posts each way daily, ^mo Tlie 
village is delightfully situated, and has a large 
number of resident gentry in and about it. The 
Baptists have a place of worship here.-«Mo^The 
living (St. Nicholas), a rectory in the diocese of 
Rochester, is valued at £18. 3s. 9d.: pres. net 
income, £458: patron, W. W. Maitland, Esq.: 
pres. incumbent, A. Hamilton, 1805: contains 
3,170 acres: 180 houses: pop»- in 1841, 1,333: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 1,533 : ass*- propJ^- £6,908 : 
poor rates in 1838, £261. Is. 

LOUGHTON, Salop, a chapelry in the parish 
of Chetton — (which see for access, &c.): 142 miles 
from London: 4 from BridgeuorUi, 16 from Lud- 
low. -o*=* Money orders issued at Bridgenurth : 
London letters deliv^* 8.) a.m.: post closes 4^ p.m. 
>o*c^The living is a curacy, annexed to the rectory 
of Chetton: contains 1,170 acres: 20 houses: 
pop"* in 1841, 113: ass*- prop^- £410: poor rates 
in 1838, £19. 18s. 

LOUND, Lincoln, a hamlet in the parish of 
Witham-on-the-Hill — (which see for access, &c.) : 
98 miles from London, 2 from Bourn, 9 from Stam- 
ford.-s»«o-Tithes commuted in 1813. 

LOUND, NoTTiNOHAif, a township in the parish 
of Sutton — (which see for access, &c.) — on the 
river Idle : 148 miles from London, 4 from East 
Retford, 5 from Bawtry.-oM>-Money orders issued 
at East Retford : London letters deliv*- 9} a.m. : 
post closes 3} p.m.-o«o^The Wesleyan Methodists 
have a chapel here.^oM^Contains 83 houses : pop*** 
in 1841, 438: ass*- prop'- £1,921: poor rates in 
1838, £135. 6s. 

LOUND, Suffolk, a parish in the bun*- and 
union of Mutford and Lothin gland : 141 miles from 
Loudon (coach road 119), 5 from Lowestoft, 6 from 
Yarmouth.^oMs-East. Co'- Rail, through Norwich 
to Yarmouth, thence 6 miles : from Derby, through 
Syston, Peterborough, Norwich, &c., 192 miles. 
-o«o^Money orders issued at Lowestoft: London 
letters deliv*- 9^ a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-aM»>The 
living (St. John the Baptist), a disch*- rectory in 
the archd'- of Suffolk, aud diocese of Norwich, is 
valued at £8 : pres. net income, £458 : patron, 
Benjamin Dowson, Esq. : pres. incumbent, £. 



Tfaorlow, 1817 : oontains 1,040 acres : 85 houseg: 
pop** in 1841, 412 : aes*^ prop^* £2,263 : poor rates 
in 1838, £119. 168. 

LOUTH, Lutcolubhise, a pariah, borough, and 
market town, in the Wold division of the hnn^- of 
Louth-Esk, parts of Lindsey, union of Louth : 141 
miles from London (coach road 148), 26 from 
Lmooln.->M<» Gt. Nor. Rail, through Peterborough 
and Boston to Louth station : from Derby, through 
Grantham and Boston, &c., 102 niile8.-9w»>Mone7 
orders issued here : London letters deliv^ 8 a.ni. : 
post closes 8 p.m.'«3«=>-Thi8 is a neat, clean, and 
wsU-bailt town, healthfully situated, and consists 
of a number of streets, mostly good, but irregularly 
disposed. It was anciently caJled Luda^ from its 
situation on the Lud, a small rivulet formed by the 
confluence of two streams in a fertile valley, at 
the eastern foot of the Wold. Towards the west, 
the rising grounds afford numerous and varied 
prospects, the scenery of this range of hills being 
rapidly diTersified with height and dale, but some- 
what bare of timber. Towards the west the coun- 
try is level and well-wooded, and is agreeably in- 
terspersed with villages, ohurohea, and mansions. 
But Louth has few historical memorkL, the most 
striking incident in its annals being the part the 
inhabitants took in the rebellion excited in 1536, 
by the suppression of the monastic institutions, 
and ealled the *^ Pilgrimage of Qrace," when Dr. 
Maekerel, dHaa Captain Cobbler, the prior of Bar- 
ling's Abbey, was an active partisan, and with 
the vicar of Louth, and thirteen other ringleaders, 
was executed for his treason. Prior to that sup- 
pression, the conventual buildings in Louth were 
numerous, but none of them appear to have been 
of any particular note. Alexander, Bishop of Lin- 
coln, a celebrated man in his time, in 1139 built 
an abbey in the park, near the town, for Cistertian 
monks, whom he brought from Fountains to Ha- 
verholm ; their revenues at the general dissolution 
amounted to £169 per annum. But few traces 
are left oi the monastery. There were formerly two 
parish churches in Louth, but of these, that of St. 
James alone remains. A new churoh was built 
about the year 1833, by subscription, chiefly of 
one individual, but without endowment. The liv- 
ing of St. James's is a discharged vicarage, a pe- 
adiar of the prebendary of Louth in the cathedral 
of Lincoln; rated at £12; gross income £350. 
Hthes commuted 1801. The churoh is a beauti- 
ful structure in the later style of English arohiteo- 
ture, with a rich tower smd spire 288 feet in height. 
It is considered one of the finest structures in a 
county celebrated for its churohes. The prebend 
of liOttth is rated at £36. 3s. 4d., and in the pa- 
tronage of the bishop. Here are an Independent 
chapel, formed in 1820; a Wesleyan Methodist, in 
1837; and a Primitive Metiiodist, m 1820: the 
Baptists and Roman Catholics have also places of 
woiBhip. A free grammar-school was founded by 
Edward VI., and endowed with the revenues of seve- 
nl of the suppressed guilds or brotherhoods, the 
head-master and under-master receiving very hand- 
some stipends, while a fourth of the amount, about 
£160, is yearly paid to twelve beadswomen. The 
corporation are the governors of the school, under 
the king's charter. James I. granted a charter 
for a quarter sessions, and for the appointment of 



a warden and one assistant, to act as justices of 
the peace for the borough, the boundaries of which 
were made co-extensive with those of the parish ; 
by the charter given in the 10th year of George 
IV., two additional assistants were also appointed. 
The income of the corporation is about £1,300 a 
year. For its trade, Louth depends almost entirely 
upon the agricultural population by which it is sur- 
rounded. The principal traffic outwards is by the 
Louth Navigation, a canal formed in 1761, at an 
expense of about £12,000, and through which corn 
is exported to London and Yorkshire, and coal and 
other similar conmiodities are received in exchange; 
hut there are various steam and wind mills, paper 
mills, and other works in the vicinity, and Louth 
is also celebrated for its ale, a considerable quantity 
of which is brewed here. A workhouse has 
been erected here, which is capable of accommo- 
dating about 300 persons; the Louth poor-law 
union comprises 87 paiishes, with a population of 
26,000 persons, spread over an area of 238 square 
miles.-o«o>Tho living (St. James) contains 3,620 
acres: 1,447 houses: pop"- in 1841, 8,935: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 10,275: ass"*- prop^- £17,761 : 
poor rates in 1838, £2,245. 1 Is. Tithes commuted 
1801.-«>«^Market day, Wednesday. Fairs : tiiird 
Monday after Easter, August 5, Friday before 
Sept. 18 and Oct. 28, I^^ov. 23. Market every 
other Friday, for fat stock. -oK>-Bankers : Branch 
of Lincoln and Lindsey Banking Company — draw 
on Prescot, Grote, Cave, & Co. ; Garfit, Claypans, 
& Co. — draw on Masterman, Peters, & Co.^om^^ 
Inns: Fleece, Woolpack, King's Head, Mason's 
Arms. 

LOUTH-PARK, Lincolx, an extra-parochial 
hamlet, in the parish of Louth: 150 miles from 
London, 2 from Louth, 9 from Alford.-<Mo^(For 
access and postal arrangements, see above. )-oMa- 
Contains 370 acres: 9 houses: pop°- in 1841, 87: 
ass*- propy- £1,264: poor rates in 1838, £57. 6s. 

LOYEDALE, Stapfobd, a township in the 
parish of Pentridge — (which see for access, &c.) — 
(Returns with the parish.) 

LOVERSALL, West Riding, York, a parish in 
the soke and union of Doncaster : 188 miles from 
London (coach road 160), 4 from Doncaster, 5 
from TickhiU,-3»ci-Nor. West. Rail, through Rug- 
by, Derby, and Swinton, to Doncaster, thence 4 
miles: from Derby, through Swinton, &c, 56 miles. 
-oMSi- Money orders issued at Doncaster: London 
letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«c>.The 
living, a perpetual curacy in the ardid^* and dio- 
cese of York, is valued at £10. 10s : pros, net in- 
come, £53: patron. Vicar of Doncaster: pros, in- 
cumbent, R. J. Sharpe, 1847: contains 2,220 
acres: 28 houses: pop" in 1841, 159: ass^- prop^* 
£2,631 : poor rates in 1838, £143. 12s, 

LOVESTON, Pembroke, a parish in the hun^ 
and union of Narbeth, South Wales: 249 miles 
from London (coach road 258), 3 from Narbeth, 
10 from Perabrokc-MoGt. West. Rail, through 
Stonehouse, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Swansea, 
thence 35 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Gloucester, &c., 240 miles.^oMa^ Money orders 
issued at Narbeth : London letters deliv''- 9 p.m. : 
post closes 8^ p.m.-o«<^The living, a rectory in the 
arohd^ and diocese of St. David's, is valued at 
£4. 56. 5d. : pres. net income, £109 : patron. Earl 



LOV 



120 



LOW 



Cawdor: pres. incumbent, Wm. Bowling: contains 
27 houses: pop"- in 1841, 170: ass*- prop^- £741 : 
poor rates in 1838, £47. 19s. 

LOVINGTON, Somerset, a parish in thehun^ 
of Catsash, union of Wincanton, south of the river 
Brue : 135 miles from London (coach road 116\ 3 
from Castle Carey, 7 from Ilchester.-o«o-Gt West. 
Kail, through Chippenham to Westbury, thence 
25 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham and 
Chippenham, &c., 193 miles. -<»«o-Money orders 
issued at Castle Carey : London letters deliv^ 9 
a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o^c^The parochial charities 
produce about £9 a year.-o«o-The living (St. 
Thomas), a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Bath 
and Wells, is valued at £10: pres. net income, 
£76 : patron. Dean and Chapter of Wells : pres. 
incumbent, R. J. Meade, 1846 : contains 560 acres: 
32 houses: pop»in 1841, 239: ass*- prop^- £1,290: 
poor rates in 1838, £100. 14s. Tithes commuted 
in 1839. 

LOWCROSSE.— See Huttoh-Locras. 

LOWDHAM (or Ludham), NomKOHAii, a par- 
ish in the southern division of the wapentake of 
Thurgarton, union of Southwell : the parish con- 
tains the townships of Caythorpe and Gunthorpe : 
138 miles from London (coach road 131), 7 from 
Nottingham, 5 from Southwell. -o«o- Nor. West. 
Rail, through Rugby and Nottingham to Lowdham 
station, thence 1 mile: from Derby, through Not- 
tingham, &c., 24 miles."o«c>^Money orders issued 
at Nottingham : London letters deliv** 9 a.m.: post 
closes 6} p.m.-o«=»The manufacture of hosiery is 
carried on to a small extent here. There is a Wes- 
leyan Methodist chapel in the village. The paro- 
chial charities produce about £4 a year.^«>*o-The 
living, a disch*- vicarage in the diocese of Lincoln, 
is valued at £4. 18s. 4d. : pres. net income, £276: 
patron. Earl Manvers : pres. incumbent, H. 
Browne : contains 3,010 acres : 287 houses : pop*^- 
in 1841, 1,483: probable pop»- in 1849, 1,705: 
ass*- propy- £2,894 : poor rates in 1838, £331. 178. 

LOWDHAM (or Lddham), Suffolk, a parish 
in the hun*- of Wilford, union of Woodbridge, on 
the western bank of the Deben : 82 miles from 
London (coach road 83), 5 from Woodbridge, 1 
from Wickham-Market. -o^o- East. Co** Rail, to 
Ipswich, thence 14 miles : from Derby, through 
London, &c., 214 miles.-or>e>The living is valued 
at £6. 10s. — (Pop"* returned with Pettistkeb.) 
-o«o^Lowdham Park is the seat of Jacob William 
Carey Whitbrcad, Esq. The Hall is a fine man- 
sion, standing in a beautiful park. 

LOWESBY (or Losebt), Leicester, a parish in 
the eastern division of the bun*- of Goscote, union 
of Billcsdon : the parish includes the chapelry of 
Cold Newton: 112 miles from London (coach road 
98), 10 from Leicester, 12 from Oakham.-o«3^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Rugby to Leicester, thence 10 
miles: from Derby, through Leicester, &c., 39 
miles. -«>M»- Money orders issued at Leicester: Lon- 
don letters deliv*- 10 a.m. : post closes 7} p.m. 
-«o«o-The church, which is very ancient, has an 
embnttled tower, and a peal of three bells, one of 
which is said to be more than 600 years old. The 
villsge is celebrated for its ornamental pottery, 
consisting of flower-pots, terra-cotta vases, tiles, 
and other similar articles. -o«o- The living (All 
Saints), a diBch*- vicarage in the diocese of Peter- 



borough, is valued at £7. Is. 5id. : pres. net in* 
come, £98: patron, Sir F. G. Fowke: pres. in- 
cumbent, G. J. A. Jones, 1849: contains 2,350 
acres: 42 houses: pop"- in 1841, 220: ass'-propi^- 
£4,663: poor rates in 1838, £148. 158. -^3*e^ 
Lowesby Hall is the seat of Sir Frederick Gnstavns 
Fowke, Bart., descended from the ancient family 
of Fowkes of Brewood and Gunston, in the county 
of Stafford, whose father, Sir Thomas Fowke, Knt., 
was groom of the bedchamber to Henry, Duke of 
Cumberland. Sir Thomas was created a baronet 
in 1814. 

LOWESTOFT, Suffolk, a parish, seaport, and 
market town, in the faun*- and union of Mutford 
and Lothingland: 136 miles from London (coach 
road 114), 10 from Yarmouth.^a^e-East. Co*- Rail. 
through Norwich to Lowestoft station : from Der- 
by, through Syston, Peterborough, Norwich, &c., 
168 miles.^oM*. Money orders issued here : I.<ondon 
letters deliv*- 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. : post closes 5( 
p.m. "<Mo-Lowe8 toft is situated on the eastermost 
point of the English coast, upon a lofty eminence, 
which commandls an extensive view of the German 
Ocean, and forms a remarkably beautiful object 
when beheld from the sea. It consists chiefly of 
one principal street, running in a gradual descent 
from north to south, with several others of much 
smaller size diverging from it on each side. The 
High Street is situated Just on the summit of the 
cliff, so that the houses on the east side of it face 
the sea. The declivity, which falls from the height 
to the sands below, was formerly merely a bare and 
desert object, but improvements have <^ late yean 
so progressed, that it has been altogether covered 
with highly cultivated gardens, beautified with 
alcoves, and the other evidences of taste and refine- 
ment. At the bottom of the gardens, a long range 
of buildings has been erected the whole length of 
the town, for curing fish. The dealers have thus 
the advantage of an easy transfer of their herrings 
from the water, and ihe inhabitants above are 
saved from the unpleasant effluvia which neces- 
sarily arises from the curative process ; but this 
benefit is in some measure counteracted by the dis- 
tance fwm the lodgings of those invalids and other 
visitors who resort to Lowestoft for sea-bathing, 
for which the shore, consisting of a hard sand, is 
peculiarly favournble. The parochial church is 
situated about half a mile to the west of the town ; 
the supposed reason for its having been erected 
there being, that it would be more safe fr*om the 
incursions 6f the sea. It is an ancient and inter- 
esting edifice, with a tower and spire about 120 
feet high. The body of the church consists of a 
nave, separated from two side aisles by rows of 
lofty handsome pillars, and a chancel; this last 
being neat and elegant. In popish times the church 
had a rood loft, which was accidentally discovered 
some years since by the falling of some bricks from 
a Imttress. The principal entrance is a stately 
porch on the south side, over which there is a room 
called the " Maids* Chamber,** which is said to 
have received its appellation from having been, 
before the Reformation, the residence of two maiden 
sisters, named Elizabeth and Catherine, who lived 
in religious seclusion. Of these two ladies it is 
further reported, that they caused two wells to be 
dug between the church and the town, for the 



I 




bene6t of the inbiAbitaiits, and that the pzesent 
name of them, " Basket Wells," ia only a corrap- 
tion of Bess and Kate. Manj persona of consider- 
able note have been bnried hersi and among them 
aie Bear- Admiral Usher, who took a share in most 
of the hard naval engagements fonght with the 
Datch in the earlj part of the reigpa of Charles II. ; 
and Admiral 8ir John Ashby, who defeated the 
French in the battle of Bantry Bay, and in the 
eogagementa of Beaehy Head, in 1689, and Gape 
La Hogue, in 1792 ; for these achieyements he 
was knighted, and subsequently was made post- 
admiral and commander-in-chief of the royal nary, 
and general of marines. Next to his there is a 
monument to the memory of his nephew, CSaptain 
Mighell, who greatly distinguished himself in most 
of the naval actions at the beginning of the last 
century. Formerly there were two chapels in 
Lowes t oft, but one was swallowed up in the ravages 
of the sea, and the other fell into a ruinous condi- 
tion. These have been replaced by a new chapel 
of ease, erected within the last few years; it is a 
handsome Gothic edifice, dedicated to St. Peter. 
Lowestoft is also provided with a theatre, assembly- 
iDom, public lifaraxy, and gas-works; and, in 1840, 
an excellent infirmary was opened for the benefit 
of the poor. Lowestoft is an out-station under the 
port of Yarmouth, and belong^ to the custom-house 
establishment there ; it has a principal coast officer. 
South-westward of the town lies Lake Lothing, 
contuning 160 acres, which forms a harbour and 
part of the ship canal commenced in 1827; the 
entrance to the present harbour from the sea was 
opened in 1831. Over the lock there is an iron 
swing-biidge of 50 feet span, which opens in the 
centre, and aUows a free passage for vessels in the 
whole of that space. At the west end of the lake, 
between the sea water and the inland waters 
of the country, a ship lock has been erected, 
with two pairs of gates which point either way, 
thus allowing free ingress and egress at all times. 
Other great improvements have since been added, 
but the chief of them has been the formation of the 
railway, which only terminates at the harbour. 
The chief trade of the town consists in fish, the 
men taking to the herring and mackerel fishing 
alternately ; and there are also numerous establish- 
ments tor boat and ship-building, and the manu- 
faetttie of rope, twine, sailcloth, and other similar 
sea stores. The Baptist, Wesleyans, and Inde- 
pendents, all have chapels here; and the charitable 
endowmeots of the place are very numerous for its 
size, some of them very ancient. Some few years 
ago, six almshouses were built for six of the poorest 
master-fishermen of the town, who also participate 
in the other benefactions. Lowestoft forming part 
of the royal demesne, its inhabitants are freed from 
serring on juries, but petty sessions are held here 
every Wednesday. The coast is protected by two 
forts and a small battery. On the shore thera aro 
two lighthouses; one on the brow of the hill, at 
the northern entrance of the town, has a rovolving 
light ; the lower one is constructed of timber, and 
is moveable at pleasuro. This is done in order to 
show the right channel when altered by the shift- 
ing of the sands. The learned William Whiston, 
professor of mathematics at Cambridge, Bishop 

Tanner, author of the *Notltia Monastiica,' and 
Tou in. * 



Bobert Potter of *JEschylus,' 'Euripides,' and 'So- 
phocles,' were vicars of this pari8h.-o«a-The living 
(St. Margaret), a vicarage in the archd''* of Suffolk, 
and diocese of Norwich, is valued at £10. Is. ^d. : 
pres. net income, £323 : patron, Bishop of Norwich : 
pros, incumbent, F. Cunningham, 1810: contains 
1,950 acros: 857 houses: pop°- in 1841, 4,647: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 5,344 : ass*- prop^- £7,451 : 
poor rates in 1838, £888."OK».Market day, Wednes- 
day. Fairs: May 12, Bt. Michael's day, and Oct. 
10, for pedlery.-oM»-Bankers : Sir Edmund Knowles 
Lacon, Bart— draw on Glyn, Halifax, & Co. ; 6ur- 
neys & Co. — draw on Barolay, Bevan, & Co.^<Me>- 
Queen's Head Inn, and Crown and Anchor Hotel. 

LOWESWATEB, Cumberland, a parochial cha- 
pelry in the ward of Allerdale, above Derwent, 
union of Cockermouth: 347 miles from London 
(coach road 302), 9 from Keswick, 7 from Cocker- 
mouth.-eM>*Nor. West. Rail, through Crowe, Lan- 
caster, and Carlisle, to Cockermouth, thence 7 
miles : from Derby, through Crowe, &c., 247 miles. 
•MMo- Money orders issued at Keswick: London 
letters deliv^ 2} p.m. : post closes 10} a.m.-<Mo- 
The chapelry lies in an extensive valley, which is 
waterod by the river Cocker, and comprises Lowes- 
water lake, the shoros of which aro greatly cele- 
brated for their picturosque beauty. One of the 
schools hero is endowed with £8. 8s. per annum ; 
the other charities produce about £2. 12b. 6d. per 
annum."<Mo-The living, a perpetual cnracy in the 
arohd^' of Richmond, and diocese of Chester, is 
valued at £4. lis. : pres. net income, £49: patron, 
Earl of Lonsdale: pros, incumbent, J. Atkinson, 
1828 : contains 4,360 acros : 86 houses : pop**- in 
1 841, 436 : ass**- props'- £1,910 : poor rates in 1838, 
£176. lOs. 

LOWICK, Lahcastbk, a chapelry on the western 
bank of the Crake, in the parish of Ulverston — 
(which see for access, &c.) : 262 miles from Lon- 
don, 6 from Ulverston, 6 from Broughton. ^om»- 
Money orders issued at Ulverston: London letters 
deliv*- 8j a.m. : post closes 8} p.m.-o«<»-The cha- 
rities produce about £6. 6s. a year.-<Mo-The living, 
a perpetual curacy in the archd^- of Richmond, and 
diocese of Chester, is valued at £10 : pres. net in- 
come, £75: patron. Miss Everard and others : pres. 
incumbent, Isaac Gaskarth, 1846 : contains 2,720 
acres: 72 houses: pop*** in 1841, 374: ass*^ prop^- 
£2,145: poor rates in 1838, £173. 5s. 

LOWICK (or Lufpwiok), Northamitow, a parish 
in the hun^ of Huxloe, union of Thrapston, on a 
branch of the Eden : 91 miles from London (coach 
road 76), 2 from Thrapston, 6 from Oundle.-o«o- 
Nor. West. Rail, through Blisworth and North- 
ampton to Thrapston, thence 2 miles : from Derby, 
through Weedon, Northampton, &c., 103 miles. 
o» e . Money orders issued at Thrapston: London 
letters deliv'- 7} a.m. : post closes 9 p m.-oro^(hie 
of the schools here is endowed with a ront-charge 
of £90 per annum.-e«o-The living (St. Peter), a 
rectory in the arohd^* of Northampton, and diocese 
of Peterborough, is valued at £16.88. llj^d.: pros, 
net income, £308: patron, Mrs. W. Stopford: 
pres. incumbent, John Stoddart, 1842: contains 
2,200 acres: 83 houses: pop**- in 1841, 430: ass** 
propJ^- £2,740: poor rates in 1838, £251. 6s. 
Tithes and moduses commuted in 1771. 

LOWICK, NoBTHUMSEBiiAirD, a parish in the 



LOW 



122 



LOW 



eastern division of the ward of Glendale, union of 
Glendale: 364 miles from London (coach road 
327), 7 from Wooler, 7 from Belford.-o«e^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Rughy, Derby, York, New- 
castle, and Belford, to Beal station, thence 3 miles : 
from Derby, through York, &c., 232 mile8.-«3*>* 
Money orders issaed at Belford: London letters 
deliv^- 4 p.m. : post doses 9 p.m.«»«oTbere is a 
Presbyterian chapel here. Coal and limestone are 
found in the parifih.-oM>»The living, a perpetual 
curacy in the archd'- of Northumberland, and dio- 
cese of Durham, is valued at £11. lOs. : pres. net 
income, £150: patron. Dean and Chapter of Dor- 
ham: pres. incumbent, G. JenkinsoA, 1829: con- 
tains 12,740 acres: 370 houses: pop°* in 1841, 
1,941 : probable pop"- in 1849, 2,232 : ass*- propJ^- 
£11,030 : poor rates in 1838, £794. 178. 

LOW -QUARTER^ Lancaster, a township in 
the parish of Kirkby-Ireleth — (which see for ao-< 
cess, &o.) — at the mouth of the river Dudden: 
266 miles from London, 5 from Ulversion, 3 front 
Dalton. ^0*0 Money orders issued at Uhrerston » 
London letters deliv^ 8} a.m.: post closes 8^ p.m^ 
-oM^Contains 2,100 acres: 125 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 644. — (Other returns with the parish.) 

LOW-QUARTER, Nobthumberlakd, a township 
in the parish of Hexham — (which see for access, 
&c.): 279 miles from London, 2 from Hexham, 6 
from Corbridge.-a«o-Money orders issued at Hex- 
ham : London letters deliv*^* 1 p.m. : post closes at 
noon.-oeci-Con tains 92 houses: pop°* in 1841, 479. 
— (Other returns with the parish.) 

LOWSIDE, DuBUAM, a township in the parish 
of Wickham — (which see for access, &o.) : 273 
miles from London, 3 from Gateshead, 4 from New- 
castle.-oAo^Money orders issued at Gateshead : Lon- 
don letters deliv^* 11 a.m. : post closes 2^ p.m. 
^D^ic^Contains 220 houses: pop°- in 1841, 1,192. 
— (Other returns with the parish.) 

LOWSIDE-QUARTER, Cuubbrland, a town- 
ship in the parish of 6t. Bees — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.) — on the sea- coast : 296 miles from Lon- 
don, 4 from Whitehaven, 3 from Egremont.-«Mo- 
Money orders issued at Whitehaven : London letters 
deliv** 5^ p.m. : post closes 1} p.m.-cMo-Contains 
40 houses: pop"- in 1841,299: ass^^prop^- £2,430: 
poor rates in 1838, £74. 48. 

LOWTHER, Westmobeland, a parish in West 
ward, union of West ward, on tiae river Lowther : 
276 miles from Liondon, 4 from Penrith, 12 from 
Appleby .-o*»-Nor« West. Rail, through Crewe and 
Lancaster to Clifton station, thence 2 miles ) from 
Derby, through Crewe, &Cy 176 mile8.-o«o-Money 
orders issued at Penrith : London letters deliv^' 
10 a.m. : post doses 3 p.m.-o«e»The village of 
Lowther formerly stood before the north front of 
the present castle, and consisted of the hall, church, 
and seventeen tenements, with their messuages 
and cottages ; but the latter of these were purchased 
by Sir John Lowther in 1 682 ; the lands were laid 
to his demesne, and the buildings pulled down to 
open the prospect from the hall. In lieu of the 
village, Sir John built Lowther new town, which 
consists of the habitations of the tenantry and de- 
pendents of the Earl of Lonsdale. The old rectory- 
house of Lowther was a mean edifice, but the first 
Viscount Lowther rebuilt it in a handsome style, 
in a secluded but delightful situation on the baaks 



of tiie river, a;t tlie same tSme ezdianging lands for 
the glebe much to the advantage of the rectory. 
The clmroh was also, about the same period, rebuilt 
by the same nobleman ; it is finished with a dMW» 
and lantern, after the fashion of St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral in London. It stands, embasmned in treea^ 
on a high bank overlooking the Lowther, is ele- 
gantly finished, and contains several handsomer 
monuments of th« noble family whose donaiB it 
adorns^ Lowther Castle, one of the most superb 
of the noble residences in the British dominfonsy 
stands on the site of an old mansion whieh w«9 
pulled down and rebuilt, in 1685, by Sir John 
Lowther, whose edifice was, however, alnoet en« 
tirely destroyed by firs in 1720. His saeeessor^ 
the earl, provided immense quantities of stone, 
timber, and other materials, ibr the erection of the 
present magnificent stractnre, but it was destined 
ibr the fine comprehension and elegant taste of hitf 
son to oany his design into- execution* The fonn* 
dation was laid in 1808, and was partiaUy occupied 
in 1809. The building is of stone, and is of the 
style which prevailed for casteDated resideness dar- 
ing the thirteenth and fourteenth oentaries^ The 
entranee to it ia from the north, through an arehed 
gateway, and all the other appikaces of a first-rate 
noble's domain. From the gateway an embattled 
wall extends, with towers at intoryals, enclosing 
an entrance court of verdant turf, intersected by a 
gravelled walk, and bounded on each side by roada 
30 feet broad, which rise to a terrace 500 feet longj^ 
and lOO feet wide. The centre of the north front 
is embellished with a rich open porch for receiving 
carriages; that leads to an entrance halV 60 feet 
by 30, which opens upon a staircase 60 feet square, 
and 90 feet high, surrounded by corridors or eacb 
story, which conducts to the several t^rtments^ 
From the staircase, arched stone corridora also open 
upon each side, through the centre of the castle, 
into corridors with arcades lighted at each end by 
windows of painted glass. To say that the apart- 
ments in such an edifice as this are ample in dimen- 
sions, and magnificent in their appearance, would 
be a superfluity. All that the most refined taste, 
and the most unlimited outlay could purshaso, have 
been contributed to their adornment. Kor is the 
outside of the eastle unworthy of the structure of 
whidi it is the cynosure, for the parks and pleasnre- 
gprounds which surround this magnificent edifiee 
are not only of large extopt, and of singular pic- 
turesqneness of beauty, but the different portiotiB 
of them command most extensive and varied pros- 
pects, if equalled, certainly not surpassed, by any 
other place of similar character in the kingdam. 
The noble lord of this splendid domain, the Earl of 
Lonsdale, derives his descent frx>m one of the meat 
ancient £unilies in the kingdom. Glaus Worrnina, 
who was consulted by Spelman, found ** Ijoder,'* or 
^^Lother," a common name among the ancient 
kings of Denmark, and derives it from the term 
Loth-er^ or "fortunate honour;" and certain it ia, 
that the family of Lowther have been seated in 
Cumberland and Westmoreland from the remotest 
periods of anything like authentic history. The 
first, however, of the name, who appears promi- 
nently on the rolls of our annals, was Sir I^chard 
Lowther, Knt, who was high sheriff of Cumber- 
hmd in the 8th and 30th of Elizabeth, succeeding 



fcM 



bis eoiisin Henry, Lord Soroope, as lord-warden of 
the West Marcbes; and was thrioe oommissioner 
in the great affairs between England and Scotland 
in the reign of the same qneen. The grandson of 
this gentleman sat for some time as the represen- 
tatiye of Westmoreland in tbe House of Ck>m- 
nums, during the reigns of James I. and Charles I. ; 
and his eldest son, Sir John Lowtber, who also sat 
fijr Westmoreland, was created a baronet in 1675. 
Sir John Lowtber, tbe grandson of that gentleman, 
and tbe thirty-first knight in direot succession in 
tiiefiimily, was, in 1690, made first commissioner of 
file Treasory, and elevated to the peerage by tbe 
titles of Viscount Lonsdale and Baron Lowtber. 
The Tisoounty ceased on tbe death of bis grandson, 
Lord Henry, the third viscoant, bot tbe estates 
and the baronetcy descended to bis great-nephew, 
Sir James Lowtber, eldest son of Robert 'Lowtber, 
Esq., goreraor of Barbadoes, who was, in 1784, 
created a peer by the titles of Baron Lowtber of 
Lswtber, Viscount Lowtber, and Karl of Lonsdale. 
HsTing no issue, he, in 1797, obtained a new pa- 
tent, -whioh created him Baron and Viscount Low- 
tber, with remainder to his cousin, the Rev. 6ir 
William Lowtber, Bart, of SwilUngton. The earl 
died without issue, and his first titles died with 
him, but his latter honours devolved on Sir William, 
son of the rev. baronet, who was, in addition, in 
1807, created Earl of Lonsdale. His lordship, who 
was a knight of the Garter, lieutenant-colonel in 
the army, lord-lieutenant of the counties of Cum- 
beriand and Westmoreland, and recorder of Car- 
lisle, died in 1844, when be was succeeded in bis 
titles and estates by the present noble proprietor, 
who has filled a distinguished office in the state, is 
lieutenant-colonel commandant of the Westmore- 
land Militia, and was elevated to the House of 
Lords during the lifetime of his father.-<«o*Tbe 
living (St. Michael), a rectory in the archd^* and 
diocese of Carlisle, is valued at £25. 7s. S^d. : pres. 
net income, £283: patron, Eazl of Lonsdale: pres. 
incumbent, Wm. Jackson, 1828: contains 3,090 
acres: 98 bouses: pop"- in 1841, 470: ass*- prop^- 
£4,474: poor rates in 1838, £163. 

LOWTHORP, East Ridiko, York, a parish in 
the wapentake of Dickering, union of Driffield: 
207 miles firom Iiondon (coach road 198), 5 from 
Great Driffield, 9 from Bridlington, -om^ Gt. Nor. 
RaiL through Peterborough, Boston,- Great Ghims- 
by, and Hull, to Great Driffield, thence 5 miles : 
from Derby, through Normanton, Selby, Hull, &c., 
136 miles. ->3«»-'Money orders issued at Driffield: 
London letters deliV^ 11} a.m. : post closes 1 p.m. 
-••o- There was formerly a college or large chantry 
here, founded in tbe time of Edward III., and con- 
sisting of a rector, six chaplains, and three clerks. 
c»c The living (St. Martin), a perpetual curacy in 
the archd'- of the east riding and diocese of York, 
is valued at £9. 3s. 8d. : pres. net income, £64 : 
patron, W. J. St. Quintin: pres. incumbent, T. 
Ibbotson, 1808: contains 1,960 acres: 25 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 164: ass*- prop^- £2,574: poor 
lates in 1838, £36. 6s. 

LOWTON, Lahcastkr, a chapelry in the parish 
of Winwick--^ which see for access, &o.): 194 
miles from London, 8 from Warrington, 6 from 
Wigan. o* a Money orders issued at Warrington : 
London letters deliv'- 9 a.m.: post closes 8 p.m. 



One of the schools here is endowed with £24 
a year; the other charities produce about £28 a 
year, -o*©- Tbe living is a rectory in the diocese of 
Chester, not in charge: patron, Rector of Win- 
wick: pres. incumbent, J. Pennington, 1806: con- 
tains 1,680 acres: 361 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
2,150: probable pop"- in 1849, 2,472: ass*^ prop^- 
£4,484: poor rates in 1838, £577. 14s. 

LOXBEAR, Devon, a parish in the hun^- and 
union of Tiverton : 188 miles from London (coach 
road 167), 4 from Tiverton, 5 from Bampton.-o»o- 
Qt. West. Rail, through Bristol to Tiverton, thence 

4 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Bris- 
tol, &c., 202 miles. -o»o- Money orders issued at 
Tiverton : London letters deliv*- 8 a.m. : post closes 
6 p.m.-o*=i-The charities produce about £2. 8s. per 
annum, -s^o- The living, a discb** rectory in the 
arcbd^- and diocese of Exeter, is valued at £6. 14s. 
9jd. : pres.net income, £133: patron. Sir T. D. " 
Acland : pres. incumbent, W. Karslake, 1802 : 
contains 1,320 acres: 23 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
144: ass**- prop^- £1,046 : poor rates in 1838, £67. 
10s. 

LOXHORB, Devon, a parish in the bun*- of 
Sberwill, union of Bams£aple : 212 miles from 
London (coach road 196), 6 from Barnstaple, 9 from 
Ilfracombe.-«»»o- Gt. West. Bail, through Bristol to 
Tiverton, thence 28 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Bristol to Tiverton, &c., 226 
miles. -o«o- Money orders issued .at Barnstaple : 
London letters deliv*^- 10} a.m. : post closes 2 p.m. 
-o«c»-Tbe parish has some trifling charities. -o»<>- 
The* living (St. Michael), a rectory in the archd^- 
of Barnstaple, and diocese of Exeter, is valued at 
£9. 16s. 4Jd. : pres. net income, £177: patron, S. 
P. B. Chichester: pres. incumbent, J» H. Chiches- 
ter, 1825: contains 1,830 acres: 48 houses: popl- 
in 1841, 306: ass*- prop^- £1,118: poor rates in 
1837, £113. 15s. 

LOXLEY, Staffobd, a liberty in the parish of 
Uttoxeter: 134 miles from London, 3 from Ut- 
toxeter, 11 from Stafford. -o.©- Robin Hood is said 
to have been bom here, with what truth is some- 
what problematioal.-o«>Loxley Park is the seat of 
Thomas Sneyd Kynnersley, Esq., who assumed the 
additional name of Kynnersley on succeeding to 
the estates of his uncle, Clement Kynnersley, Esq., 
the descendant of an ancient race who were in pos- 
session- of a fine estate in Herefordshire, at the 
time of the Norman' conquest, and one of whom, 
Hugo de Kynnardsley, was seized of the lands of 
Newland, and other estates, in Gloucestershire and 
Herefordshire, in tbe time of Henry III. This 
Hugh accompanied Prince Edward in his crusade 
to the Holy Land, and received the honour of 
knighthood. From him was descended, through 
a long line of distinguished aneestry, the late pro- 
prietor of Loxley. 

LOXLEY, Warwick, a parish in the Snittcr- 
field division of the bun*- of Barlichway, union of 
Stratford-on- Avon : 113 miles from London (coach 
road 89), 4 from Stratford-on- Avon, 9 from War- 
wick.-<»«c^Gt. West. Rail, through Oxford to Strat- 
ford-on- A von, thence 4 miles : from Derby, through 
Rugby and Coventry to Leamington, 69, thence 
10 miles. -3»<>-Money orders issued at Stratford-on- 
Avcn : London letters deliv**- 84 a.ra. : post closes 

5 p.m. -o«o-The charities produce about £4. lOs. 



per annum. -o«e>>The living (St. Nicholas), a disch'*' 
vicarage in the archd^- and diocese of Worcester, is 
valued at £5. 69. 8d. : pros, net income, £190: 
patron. Lord Chancellor: contains 1,620 acres: 62 
houses: pop°* in 1841, 318: poor rates in 1838, 
£369. 1 68. Tithes commuted in 1767. 

LOXTON. See Lockston. 

LOXWOOD-END, Sussex, a chapelry on a 
branch of the Avon, and crossed by the Avon and 
Wye Canal, in the parish of Wisborough Green — 
(which see for access, &c.): 40 miles from London, 
9 from Horsham, 12 from 6uildford.-o«o-The liv- 
ing is a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Wis- 
borough Green. — (Returns with the parish. )-o«>- 
Loxwood House is the seat of John King, Esq. 

LOYNTON, Staffobd, a township in the parish 
of High Offley — (which see for access, &c.)-o«o- 
Contains 9 houses: pop"- in 1841, 74. — (Other 
•returns with the parish.) -o*e.Loynton Hall is the 
seat of Thomas Higgins Bume, Esq., a magistrate 
and deputy-lieutenant of the county. 

LUBBENH AM, Leicestbb, a parish in the hun'^* 
of Gartree, union of Market-Harborough, inter- 
sected by the river Welland and the Union Canal : 
100 miles from London (coach road 85), 8 from 
Welford, 2 from Market-Harborough. -o»c*- Nor. 
West Hail, through Rugby to Market-Harborough, 
thence 2 miles: from Derby, through Rugby, &c., 
67 miles.-o«o-Money orders issued at Welford: 
London letters deliv^- 9 a.m : post closes 5 p.m. 
-o«>The church is a fine old building in the Eng- 
lish stjle. The sum of £26 from Alderman 
Newton's charity^ Is applied to the clothing of 25 
poor children. Tliere is an Independent chapel 
here. The inhabitants of the parish are chiefly 
employed in making block plush for hats.-«3M»-The 
living (AD .Saints), a vicarage in the diocese of 
Peterborough, is valued at £8. 5s. : pros, net in- 
come, £84:: patron, Thomas Paget, Esq.: pres. 
incumbent, H. E. BJallivant, 1842 : contains 2,400 
acres : 126 houses : pop"- in 1841, 578 : ass**- prop^- 
£4,932 : poor rates in 1837, £524. lis. 

LUBBESTHORPE, Leicester, a chapebry, west 
of the rivef Soar, in the parish of Ayleston — ^( which 
see for access, &c.): IQl miles from London, 4 from 
fjcicester, 9 from Hinckley.-««»-Money orders is- 
sued at Leicester: London letters deliv^* 8^ a.m. : 
post closes 9 p.nL-oK»-The living is a curacy, not 
in charge : contains 1,190 acres : 12 houses: popl- 
in 1841, 83: ass*"- propy£984: poor rates in 1838, 
£143. 138. 

LUCC0MB£1, Hants, in East Mendham hun^-: 
8 miles from Newport 

LUCKER, NoBTucuBERLAiiD, a chapelry in the 
parish of Bambvough — (which see for access, &c.); 
317 miles from London, 4 from Belford, 13 from 
Alnwick. -owo-Money orders issued at Belford: 
London letters deliv^* 1 p.m. : post closes 9} a.m. 
-oK»->The living is a perpetual curacy in the archd''- 
of Northumberland, and diocese of Durham : pres. 
net income, £62 : patron, Duke of Northumber- 
land : pres. incumbent, L. S. Orde, 1848 : contains 
47 houses: pop"- in 1841, 210: poor rates in 1838, 
£78. 16s. 

LUCKHAM, Somerset, a parish in the hun'- of 
Carhampton, union of Williton: 192 miles from 
London (coach road 168), 4 from Minehead, 6 from 
Pun8ter.-o«>-Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol to 



Wellington, thence 22 miles: from Derby, thioagh 
Birmingham and Bristol, &c., 206 mile8.-a«»-Mo> 
ney orders issued at Minehead: London letters 
deUv*^ 8^ a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. ot o The charities 
produce about £4. Ss. per annam.-«Mo-The living 
(the Virgin Mary), a rectory in the arohd'* Si 
Taunton, and diocese of Bath and Wells, is valued 
at £14. 13s. 6id.: pres. net income, £417 : patron. 
Sir T. D. Acland: pres. incumbent, T. Fisher, 
1839: contains 2,470 acres: 105 houses: pop'* in 
1841, 580: poor rates in 1838, £217. 28. 

LUCKINGTON (or Lockihotov), Somerset, a 
hamlet in the parish of Kilmersdon— (which see 
for access, &c) 

LUCKINGTON, Wilts, a parish in the him<>- 
of Chippenham, union of Malmesbury: 104 miles 
from London (coach road 103), 10 fit>m Chippen- 
ham, 8 from Malme8bury.-«M<>-<3^i West BaiL to 
Chippenham, thence 10 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Bristol to Chippenham, &c., 166 
miles."<Mo.Money orders issued at Chippenham: 
London letters deliv^ 9} a.m. : post closes 7} p.m. 
-<MoThe charities produce about £15 a year.-a«>> 
The living (the Virgin Mary), a rectory in the 
diocese of Gloucester and Bristol, is valued at 
£9. 7s. 8)d. : pres. net income, £278 : patron. Lords 
of the Manor : pres. incumbent, W. 8. Birch, 1848: 
contains 2,400 acres: 60 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 
329 : ass'- prop^- £2,068. Tithes commuted in 
1839. 

LUCTON, Hereford, a parish in the hnn'- of 
Wolphy, union of Leominster, situated north-east 
of the Lug : 146 miles from London (coach road 
143), 6 from Leominster, 11 horn. Ludlow.>o«e»Gt. 
West. RaiL through Oxford to Worcester, thence 
28 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham to 
Worcester, &c., 99 mileB.-««<»-Money orders issued 
at lieominster: London letters deliv^ 11 a.m.: 
post closes Ij^ p.m.*o«>.This place is principally 
noted for its free school, which is the most consi- 
derable in the county, and which was founded and 
endowed in 1708, by John Pierrepoint, Esq. : it 
has now an income of more than £1,200 a year. 
The boys entitled to enjoy the advantages of the 
institution must be resident in the parishes, ham- 
lets, and townships of Lucton, (>oft, Yarpole, 
Bircher, Luston, Ejrton, Kingsland, Shobdon, and 
Aymestrey, and at the time of their election must 
be able to read. These hoys are distinguished into 
two classes — the sons of persons not possessing 
land of their own, of the yearly value of £20, or 
renting property worth £50 per annum ; and the 
sons of persons not having property of their own 
of the yearly value of £50, or renting property not 
worth £300 per annum. Both classes are entitled 
to all the benefits of the school ; but while the first 
class obtain their education altogether gratuitously, 
and receive a suit of clothes once a year, the se- 
cond have to pay £1 per annum as a fee. Boys in 
the first class are limited to fifty, and the vacancies 
arc filled up half-yearly. A difference is made be- 
tween boys intez^ed for business, and those who 
aspire to higher frmctions. Those which are to he 
apprenticed, are admissible between the ages of 
seven and ten years, and must leave the sehool at 
the age of fourteen ; those going to college may re- 
main till they are eighteen, and may be admitted at 
any age not excee^g fourteen. A fee of £10 is 



LUD 



126 



LUD 



giTon to tiiose who are to be apprenticed. Of the 
Koond dws of boys there are twenty-two, and a 
c<dlege exhibition of £51 a year is g^ven every alter- 
nate year, if there be a candidate duly qualified 
The school is conducted by a clergynuuii who is a 
dergyman and a graduate of Oxford or Cambridge, 
and who is aided by an assistant who can teach 
mathematics, and the other higher branches of edn- 
eation. The school consists of two departments, 
and parents can choose either, and the children can 
migrate ftom. one to the other. The other charities 
of Locton amount to about £3 a year.-o«e>-The 
living is a perpetual curacy in the archd'* and 
diocese of Hereford: pros, net income, £98: patron, 
Goremors of Luoton School : pres. incumbent, G. 
a Walkey, 1831: contains 1,180 acres: 28 houses: 
pop^ in 1841, 183: ass"*- prop^- £1,296: poor rates 
in 1838, £70. 16«. 

LUDBOROUOH, Lzhcolit, a parish in Lud- 
borough wi^pentake, union of Louth: 149 miles 
ficom London (coach road 156), 8 from Louth, 11 
firom Grimsby.^cMo-Ot. Nor. Rail, through Peter- 
borough and Boston to Louth, thence 8 miles.-c^o- 
Money orders issued at Louth: London letters 
deliv^ 10 a.m : post closes 6 p.m.-e«e^There is a 
Wesleyan Methodist chapel here.^ow:^The living 
(St. Mary), a rectory in Uie archd'* and diocese of 
Idncoln, is valued at £20. 98. 4id.: pres. net 
income, £388: patron, R. Thorold, Esq.: pres. 
incumbent, 0. Thorold, 1826 : contains 2,250 acres : 
48 houses : pop"- in 1841, 321 : ass"^ prop^- £1,878 : 
poor rates in 1838, £207. 7s. Tithes commuted 
in 1774. 

LUDCHURGH, Pbioibokb, a parish in the hnn'* 
and union of Narbeth, South Wales: 257 miles 
from London, 2 from Narbeth, 5 from Tenby .-<mo- 
Money orders issued at Narbeth : London letters 
deliv^ 8) p.m. : post closes 9 p.m.-o*»'The living, 
a disch^ rectory in the archd^* and diocese of St. 
David's, is valued at £3. 14s. Hd: pres. net in- 
come, £70 : patron, the Crown : pres. incumbent, 
J. D. Palmour, 1841 : contains 44 houses: pop^- in 
1841, 220: ass^ piop^- £766: poor rates m 1838, 
£40. 86. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LUDDENDEN (or Luddihgtoh), West Rronvo, 
Yoax, a chapelry in the parish of Halifax — (which 
Bee for access, &c.) : 201 miles from London, 4 from 
Halifax, 14 from Rochdale.-<MoMoney orders is- 
sued at Hali&x: London letters deliv'* 10 a.m. : 
post doses 4^ p.m. o» ci T he living, a perpetual 
curacy in the diocese of Ripon, is valued at £3. 13s. 
4d. : pres. net income, £170: patron. Vicar of Ha- 
Uiax: pres. incumbent, J. Nelson, 1838. — (Pop"* 
with the parish.) 

LUDDENHAM, Kxht, a parish iu the hun^ 
and union of Faversham, lathe of Scray : 59 miles 
from London (coach road 56), 3 from Faversham, 
5 from Milton. a» e Nor. Kent Rail, to Strood, 
thence 18 miles: from Derby, through London, 
&e., 191 mi]es.-<Mo»>Money orders iBSued at Favers- 
ham: London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post closes 7 
p.m . c «o The living (the Virgin Mary), a rectory 
in the anshd^* and diocese of Canterbury, is valued 
at £12. 8s. 4d: pres. net income, £394: patron, 
Lord Chancellor; pres. incumbent, M. Oxenden: 
contains 990 acres: 36 houses: pop"- in 1841, 235: 
am^ propi'- £1,822 : poor rates in 1838, £40. 

LUDDESDOWN, Kbot, a paridh in the hun^- 



of Toltingtrougb, lathe of Aylesford, union of 
North Aylesford: 37 miles from London (coach 
road 29), 9 from Gravesend, 6 from Rochester. 
-o«».-Nor. Kent Rail, to Strood, thence 6 miles : 
from Derby, through London, &c., 169 miles.-oM^ 
Money orders issued at Gravesend : London letters 
deliv*- 8 J a.m.: post closes 7i p.m.-o*»-The living 
(St. Peter and St. Paul), a rectory in the archd^- 
and diocese of Rochester, is valued at £1 1. lis. 3d. : 
pres. net income, £350: patron, J. A. Wigan, 
Esq.: pres. incumbent, £. J. Shepherd, 1834; 
contains 2,380 acres : 48 houses : pop"- in 1841 , 
275: ass"^- props'- £1,027: poor rates in 1838, 
£169. 15s. 

LUDDINGTON, Ldtcoln, a parish in the wes- 
tern division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of 
Littdsey, union of Goole, west of the Trent : the 
parish includes the township of Garthorp: 194 
miles from London (coach road 166), 15 from 
Barton-upon-Humber, 12 from Thome. -o«> Gt. 
Nor. Rail, through Peterborough, Boston, and Lin- 
coln, to Doncaster, thence 18 miles: from Derby, 
through Swinton to Doncaster, &c., 88 mile8.-a9c>- 
Money orders issued at Barton: London letters 
deliv** 2 p.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«ei-The living 
(St. Oswald), a rectory and vicarage in the archd'* 
of Stow, and diocese of Lincoln, is valued at £8 : 
pres. net income, £382 : patron, J. Lister, Esq. : 
pres. incumbent, T. H. Lister, 1848: contains 
3,680 acres: 197 houses: pop"- in 1841, 982: ass**- 
prop^- £7,658: poor rates in 1837, £510. lis. 
Tithes commuted in 1796. 

LUDDINGTON, Wabwiok, a hamlet, formerly 
a chapelry, on the northern bank of the Avon, in 
the parish of Old Stratford — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 97 miles from London, 3 from Stratford-on- 
Avon, 7 from Alcester.-o«9^Moiiey orders issued at 
Stratford: London letters deliv^* 8} a.m.: post 
closes 5 p.m.-o«»-Con tains 32 houses: pop°- in 
1841, 122 : as6<** prop^"- £1,500: poor rates in 1838, 
£77. 12s. 

LUDDlNGTON-iN-THE-BROOK, Northamptoh, 
a parish, partly in the hun^* of Leigh tonstone, union 
of Oundle, county of Huntingdon, and partly in that 
of Polebrook, in the above county: 103 miles from 
London (coach road 69), 6 from Oundle, 6 from 
Stetton.-o«o»Nor. West. Rail, through Blisworth 
and Northampton to Oundle, thence 6 mUes: from 
Derby, through Weedon and Northampton, &c., 
115 miles.-<Mo-Money orders issued at Oundle: 
London letters deliv^- 8} a.m. : post closes 8} p.m. 
^^•c^The living (St. Margaret), a rectory in the 
archd'- of Northamptonanddioceseof Peterborough, 
is valued at £8. Ss. 9d. : pres. net income, £150: 
patron, Lord Montague: pres. incumbent, R. Hind, 
1831 : contains 580 acres: 24 houses : pop*^* in 1841, 
139 : ass^ prop^"- £859 : poor rates in 1838, £65. 8s. 
Tithes and moduses commuted in 1807. 

LUDFORD, Salop, a parish, partly in the hun"^ 
of Wolphy, union of Ludlow, Hereford, and partly 
in that of Munslow, in the above county, on the 
river Teme : 143 miles from London, 1 from Lud- 
low, 11 from Leomin8ter.-«>«<»-(For access, see 
Luurx>w.)-««c»-Money orders issued at Ludlow: 
London letters deliv^* 10^ a.m.: post closes 2 
p.m.-o«9-An hospital was founded here in 1672, 
by Sir J. Charlton, for six poor persons: it 
has now a revenue of £63 per annum.-oM»-Th6 



living, a yicarage in the archd^* of Salop, and dio- 
ceie of Hereford, ia valued at £1 1 : {wes. net income, 
£200 : patron, £. L. Charlton : pres. incumbent, 
C. Kent, 1836: contains ^,920 acres : 61 hoases: 
pop"- in 1841, 300: asi*- propJ^- £1,846: poor rates 
in 1838, £238. Is. 

LUDFORD (Maona and Pauta), LracouH, a 
parish in the eastern divistoa of the wapentake of 
Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union of Louth : 149 
miles from London (coach road 151 ) , 7 fron Mar- 
ket-Raisen, 6 from Louth. •««»> Gt. Nor. Rafl. 
through Peterborough and Boston to Louth, thence 
8 miles: from Derby, through Nottingham and 
Lincoln to Market-Raisen, 65 miles, thence 7. 
-oM-^Money orders issued at Market-Raisen : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m. ^•e» 
The village stands near the head of the small river 
Bain, which ialla into the Witham. A Roman 
road passes from Caiston in a Bontherlj direction, 
and another south-west from this place to Lincoln. 
From the number of relics which have been ibund, 
it is oonjeetured that this was a Soman station. 
Thoe is a Wesleyan Methodist ehapel faere.-o«»' 
Tlie living (St. Peter) , a vicarage iu the dioeese of 
Lincoln, with the rectory of Ludford Parva, is 
valued at £5. 18s. 4d. ; pres. net income, vicarial, 
£189; vectorial, £119: patron, G. F. Heneage, 
Esq.: pros, incumbent, J. Otter, 1843: contains 
3,310 acres : 108 houses : pop"*- in 1841 , 670: ass^ 
propi^- £,2989 : poor rates in 1838, £276. 108.-o«>. 
Towis House. 

LUDG£RSHALL, Bdckinohau, a paririi in the 
hun'- of Ashendon, union of Aylesbury : 54 miles 
from London (coach road 50), 6 from Bicester, 11 
from Aylesbury. -«»c»- Nor. West. Itail. through 
Chedding^ton to Aylesbury, thence 11 miles: from 
Derby, through B^gby and Cheddington, &c., 114 
miles. o «o Money orders issued at Bicester : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : post closes 6 p.m. o »o 
The church is an ancient edifice, chiefly in the 
8axon style. There was formerly an alien hospital 
here, cell to that at Staningfield, which was founded 
in the time of Henry II. The parochial charities 
produce about £19 a year.-e*e*-The living (the Vir- 
gin Mary), a rectory in the diocese of Oxford, is 
valued at £17. 18s. 6d. : pros, net income, £259 : 
patron, T. Martyn : pres. incumbent, T. Martyn, 
1821: contains 2,430 acres: 73 houses: pop*^- in 
1841, 566: ass^*- prop)"- £3,468 : poor rates m 1838, 
£336. 7s. 

LUDGER6HALL, Wilts, a parish, formerly a 
borough and market town, in Ihe hun'* of Ames- 
bury, union of Andover : 76 miles from London, 
(coach road 72) , 8 from Aadover."ew=»-Gt. West. 
Rail, to Hungerford, thence 15 miles: from 
Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, and Reading, 
to Hungerford, &c., 162 miles.-oM^Money orders 
issued at Andover: London letters deliv^ 11 
a.m.: post closes 4 p.m.-oM^^It was a borough 
by prescription, and sent members to parlia- 
ment from the time of Edward I., till it was 
disfranchised by the Reform Act. A castle was 
built here shortly after the Conquest, of which a 
few vestiges now only remain. The church is an 
ancient structure, with a low square tower. The 
Baptists and Primitive Methodists have chapels 
here. On Chidbury Hill, in the vicinity, there is 
a large piece of ground exactly in the form of a 



heart, and surrounded by tumn!i.-«M«>-The living 
(the Virgin Mary), a rectory in the archd'* and 
diocese of Sarum, is valued at £11. 6s. 8d.: pres. 
j|et income, £274 : patron, Sir S. Graham : pres. 
mcumbent, John Pannel, 1824: contuns 1,660 
acres: 116 houses: pop"- in 1841, 554: ass^ prop^' 
£1,556: poor rates in 1838, £396. 196. Tithes 
commuted in 1840.-o«»-BiddeBdon House, a band- 
some mansion, placed in the midst of fine gardens 
and surrounded by a paric, fs tlie eeat of J. H. 
Everett, Esq. 

LUDGVAN, OoBirwALi., a parish in the httn^* of 
Penwith, union of Penzance : 308 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 284), 3 from Merazion, 4 from 
Penaanoe. o>» Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol and 
Exeter to Plymouth, thence 64 miles: from Deriiy, 
through Birmingham and Bristol, &c., 322 milea. 
-ewo^Money orders issued at Merazion: Loudon 
letters deliv^ 7 p.m. : post closes 9 p.m. « •» The 
parochial charities produce about £7 a year. The 
Wesleyan Methodists have a chapel here.-«Me>-The 
living (6t. Paul), a rectory in the avchd^* of Corn- 
wall, and diocese of Exeter, is valued at £30. 11«. 
^d : pres. net income, £800 : patron. Lord Bolton : 
pres. incumbent, H. £. Graham, 1835: contains 
4,560 acres : 394 houses : pop"- in 1841, 3,190: pro- 
bable pop"- in 1849, 3,^9: ass^- prop^- £5,755: 
poor rates in 1838, £310. 138. Tithes eoramuied 
in 1839. 

LUDHAM, Norfolk, a parish in the hun^ of 
Happing, union of Tunstead and Happing: 125 
miles from London (csoaoh road 120), d from Aole, 
11 from Norwich. -o«o- East. (V- Rail, to Nor- 
wich, thence 1 1 miles : irom Derii>y , through Byston, 
Peterborough, and Norwich, &e., 177 miles^-^Mc*. 
Money orders issued at Norwich : London letters 
deliv^ 9^ a.m. : post closes 1 p.m. o»o The <dMiroh, 
erected in 1483, is a beautliful Gothic structure, 
and contains an ancient screen, and font, enriched 
with carvings of animals; it has a square em- 
battled tower, and several ancient monumental 
inscriptions. There was fbrmeriy a Grange hero, 
belonging to the monasteiy of 8t. Bennetts at 
Holme; it afterwards was converted into a palace 
for tiie bishops of Norwich, which was nearly all 
burnt down in 1611 ; since which time the remains 
have been used as a fkrm-hoase. The charities pro- 
duce about £100 a year. The Baptists and Wes- 
leyan Methodists have places of wordiipher8.-«w>- 
The living (Bt Katherine), a vicarage in thearchd^* 
and diocese of Norwich, is valued at £5. 6s. 8d. : 
pres. net income, £298 : patron, Btshop of Norwich: 
pros, incumbent, W. A. Bathurst, 1833: contains 
2,910 acres: 138 houses: pop""* in 1841, 924: ass^ 
props'- £4,199 : poor rates m 1838, £506. 14s. 

LUDLOW, Salop, a borough and market town 
in the hun'* of Munidow, union of Ludlow, on the 
southern border of the county: 157 miles ftom 
London (coach road 150), 12 from Leominster. 
^a«»-Gt. West. Rail, through Oxford and Wor- 
cester to Kidderminster, thence 22 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham to Kidderminster, 
&c., 93 miles, •^•o- Money orders issued here: 
London letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m. 
This place, called by the British Dmtm Lej/9 
Tywysog^ or the Prince's Palace, richly deserved 
its appellation from the beauty of the neifrh- 
bourhood in which it stands, and the splendid 







I 



prospects of the syrroanding eonntry which hs 
site commandfi. It is phiced on an eminenoe at 
the junction of the rivers Teme and Ciorre, in a 
fertile and picturesque district on the southern 
border of the county, being about a mile in length, 
and, on an ayeiage, half a mile in breadth. Most 
of the streets are wide and well paved, lying in 
diverging and inclined directions from the high- 
est, which is the central part of the town, a circum- 
stance which contributes greatly to the cleanliness 
of the place : the houses are mostly neatly built, 
and regularly disposed, which may be attributed 
partly to the fact, Uiat the royal court was for some 
time held in the castle here. In after ages, when 
that distinction was lost, the pleasant and healthy 
situation of the town induced many fi^milies of 
wealth and refinement to make it their abode, so 
that the old advantages in this respect were still 
retained. The ancient history of Ludlow is so 
much involved in that of its castle, that to re- 
late the one is to tell the other. This edifice, 
now only a desolate ruin, stands at the north- 
west angle of the town, on a bold wooded rock, 
the foot of which is bathed by the river. Ao 
cording to the most generally received opinions, 
it was founded shortly after the Norman Can- 
quest, by Roger de Montgomery, by whose family 
it was held tiO it was seized by Henry I., 
on the rebellion of his descendant, Robert de Be- 
lesme. Becoming then a princely residence, it 
was guarded by a numerous garrison ; but, in the 
Buooeeding reign, ihe governor, Gervase Paganell, 
having betrayed his trust, in delivering the castle 
to the Empress Maude, it was besieged by King 
Stephen, who, in conducting the operations against 
it, gave a signal proof of his courage and humanity* 
The young Prince Henry of Scotland, son of King 
David, who was actively engaged in the enterprise, 
having approached too near the walb of the castle, 
was caught from his horse by means of an iron 
hook attached to a rope. Stephen, according to 
the evidence of Matthew Paris, observing the 
perilous position of the young Prince, boldly ad* 
vanced, and rescued him at the risk of his own 
life. Stephen was, according to Lambard, shortly 
afUrwards rewarded for his heroism by the capture 
of the place« In the reign of Henry III., Ludlow 
Castle wafl made a rendezvous of the lords-marchers, 
for the purpose of aiding Roger Mortimer, then 
lord-warden of the marches, in restraining the 
Welsh marauders. The castle subsequently passed 
through a variety of hands during the troublous 
times of the wars of the Roses, and was made the 
abode of Edward V. and his little brother, previous 
to their removal to their last fatal dwelling, the 
Tower of London, under the guardianship of the 
cruel Gloucester. It was here that the eldest and 
promising Prince Arthur, son of Henry VII., died 
in April, 1502. Ludlow having now become a 
place of considerable extent and importance, Henry 
VUl. made it the seat of a " Council in the Marches 
of Wales,'* with proper officers, and an adjudicated 
sphere of local government. This council con- 
tinued to act till the time of William III., who 
abolished it, and appointed in its stead lords-lieu- 
tenants of North and South Wales. During the 
civil war, Ludlow was held by the Earl of Bridge- 
water for King Charles, but ultimately surrendered 



to the parliament. It was here that Milton's cele- 
brated * Masque of Comus ' was first performed in 
1631. Part of the site of the castle is now occu* 
pied by a delightful promenade, pleasantly shaded 
by trees. In the interior, on the right hand, are 
the barracks erected by the lords-presidents ; and 
on the left, the imposing and massive Norman keep, 
upwards of 110 feet high, having walls from 9 to 
12 feet in thickness. Opposite the portal are the 
state apartments and the principal hall, in the early 
and decorated styles of English architecture, but 
which are now mostly in ruins. A Norman arch, 
leading to the choir and nave, is almost the only 
relic of the chapel. On the whole, the remains 
of this ancient and once stately edifice are, in the 
extreme, interesting, from their natural beauty and 
the many historical associations which the sight 
and the thought of them renew, and deep and ear- 
nest are the feelings which they arouse, albeit the 
present be only a shadow of the past. Time's po- 
tent power has passed over all its beauty ; the stately 
pageant, the lordly revels, the glorious halo of 
royalty and wealth, have yielded to the slow over- 
mantling of sublunary decay. All is dim, still, 
and desolate ; but the voice of an undying spirit 
speaks through the silent mementos of days by- 
gone, and brings forth, not only the bravery of the 
gentles by whom his song was echoed, but the 
heart of the genius himself* In the beautiful 
words of the poet : — 

" Here If XLioir mng— irhat aeeita m grettsr spell 

To lure the stranger to the^e &r-AuiMd wmUsI 
The chroniclers of other ages tell, 

That prloceff oft hare graced ftAr Ladlow'fl hsHs. 
Their honours glide along ohllvion'i itream. 

And o'er the wrecks a tide of ruin drives; 
Faint, and more faint, the rays of glory heam, 

That gild their course—the bard alone survives. 
And when the rude unceasing shocks of time 

In one vast heap shall whelm this loftv pile^ 
Still shall his genius, towering and sablime, 

Tiinmphant o'er the spoils of grandeur smile; 
Still in these haunts, true to a nation's tongue. 
Echo shall love to dwell, and say, here Milton sung." 

It was in this neighbourhood that Lucien, the bro- 
ther of Napoleon Buonaparte, made his residence 
during the greater part of the time that he was in 
Engluid. The boundaries of the town are chiefly 
described by its two rivers — the Corve, running 
along its north-western, and the Teme, along the 
western and southern outskirts of the town ; the 
former is crossed by a bridge of three arches, over 
which the road leads to Shrewsbury, and the latter 
by two bridges, one on the south to Ludford, and 
the other on the west to Whi tediffe Common . Part 
of the ancient wall, built in the time of Edward 
I., may still be traced. The town is lighted with 
gas, and abundantly supplied with water by pipes 
from springs in the neighbourhood, and by works 
from tiie river Corve, by which it is conveyed to 
different parts of the several hoases. The church, 
which stands in the highest part of the town, is a 
very beautiful Gothic structure in the decorated 
style, forming one of the finest parochial churches 
in the kingdom ; it is sarmounted by a tower, 130 
feet in height, crowned "with pinnacles, and fur- 
nished with a very melodious peal of eight bells. 
The choir is lighted with five windows on each 
side, and has a splendid stained glass window at 
the east end, the compartments of which represent 
the legendary history of the tutelar saint, St. Law- 



renoe* On the nortli side there is a chapel dedi- 
cated to St John, the windows of which also con- 
tain some very precious stained gUiss, representing 
the presentation of a ring to Edward the Confessor, 
hy some pilgrims from Palestine. In the chancel 
there are several interesting monuments, especially 
one of Judge Bateman and his lady ; hut many of 
the ornaments of this church were destroyed by 
Cromwell's republican soldiery, who, however, 
spared a great portion of the beantiful oaken roof. 
The church of St. Lawrence anciently possessed a 
chantry of ten priests, supported by the rich guild 
of St. John, who gave to its choral duty the im- 
posing splendour of a cathedral service. A free 
grammar-school was founded here in the time of 
Edward YI., which has now an income of about 
£lOO per annum, besides an excellent dwelling- 
house and a garden ; it is open to the whole town, 
and there are about forty scholars instructed on the 
foundation ; the head-master generally acts as 
preacher to the town on another foundation of Ed- 
ward VI. of £44. 13s. 4d., together with another 
dwelling-house and premises, worth £20 per an- 
num. In 1704, the Rev. Richard Grave granted 
two exhibitions at Baliol College, Oxford, to this 
school. The total amount of the charitable income 
of the corporation is about £1,000 per annum, of 
which £224. 10s. constitute the income of Hosyer's 
almshouses, and £120 the income of a workhouse. 
Besides these there are several minor charities, in- 
cluding dispensaries and other similar institutions, 
for the benefit of the poor. The Independents, and 
Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists, have chapels 
here. Manufactures to some extent are carried on 
at Ludlow, but it is chiefly supported by the sur- 
rounding country districts, and its own wealthy and 
independent residents. This place appears to have 
been incorporated from time immemorial, and no 
doubt enjoyed peculiar privileges from being the 
residence of the court in ancient times, as noticed 
above ; but the first charter, of which we have any 
authentic notice, is that £^nted by Richard, Duke 
of York, father of Edward IV. The governing 
charter, however, was that granted by his son, 
which remained in exercise till the passing of the 
general municipal act. Under that act the corpo- 
ration now consists of four aldermen and twelve 
town-councillors, under the usual corporate style. 
The amount of the borough income is about £1,000 
per annum. A new commission of the peace has 
been granted, and the court of quarter sessions has 
been reappointed. Petty sessions are held every 
week or oftener, and a court-leet annually, for the 
appointment of constables and other officers. Lud- 
low first returned members to parliament in the 
twelfth year of Edward IV., the right of voting 
being in the burgesses at large. The borough, pre- 
viously to the Reform Act, returned two represen- 
tatives, as it now does, but the boundaries have 
been largely extended. The town is one of the 
polling-places for the southern division of the coun- 
ty. The Ludlow poor-law union comprises thirty- 
one parishes, with a population of about 18,000 
persons, spread over an area of 125 square miles. 
-o«o-The living (St. Lawrence), a rectory in the 
archd''* of Salop, and diocese of Hereford, is valued 
at £19. 12s. 6d. : pres. net income, £160: patron, 
-Lord Chancellor: pres. incumbent, J. Phillips, 



1841: contains 280 acres: 909 houses: pop** in 
1841, 6,064: probable pop»in 1849, 5,823: ass^ 
propy- £9,407 : poor rates in 1838, £704. 12s.-3»e^ 
Market days, Monday and Saturday. Fairs : Mon- 
day before Feb. 13, Tuesday before Easter- Wednes- 
day in Whitsunday week. May 1, Aug. 11, Sept. 
28, and first Monday in Nov. ^o««>- Bankers: Lud- 
low and Tenbury Bank — draw on Barnett, Hoares, 
& Co. ; Rocke, Eytons, Campbell, and Bayleys — 
draw on Robarts, Curtis, & Co.-oM>-Hotel8: Angel, 
Crown, and Feathers. 

LUDNEY. See Graixthorpe. 

LUDWORTH AKD CHIDWORTH, Derby, « 
township in the parish of Glossop — (which see for 
access) — on the eastern bank of the river Etherow : 
175 miles from London, 10 from Chapel-en-le- 
Frith, 10 from Ashton.-<Mo-Money orders issued 
at Buxton: London letters deliv'* 1} p.m.: post 
closes 11 a.m.-oM>>Contains 312 houses : pop"* in 
1841, 1,476: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,697: ass* 
piopy- £3,140: poor rates in 1838, £205. 138. 

LUFFENHAM, (Nocth) , Rutland, a parish in 
the hun^ of Wrangdike, union of Uppingham, on 
the northern bank of the river Chater: 110 miles 
from London (coach road 95), 5 from Uppingham, 
9 from Stamford.-<MoGt Nor. Rail, through Peter- 
borough and Stamford to Luffenham station : from 
Derby, through Syston to Lufienham, 64 miles. 
-o«o-Money orders issued at Uppingham : London 
letters deliv^- 9 a.m. : post closes 4J p.m.-o»^The 
church is a handsome Gk)thic structure, with a 
tower and spire ; in the church there is a brass 
plate to the memory of Archdeacon Johnson, tho 
founder of Oakham and Uppingham grammar- 
8chool8.-o«:i-The living (St. John the Baptist), a 
rectory in the archd^* of Northampton, and diocese 
of Peterborough, is valued at £17. Os. 5d. : pres. 
net income, £624 : patron, Emanuel College, Cam- 
bridge: pres. incumbent, John Weller, 1837: con- 
tains 1,740 acres : 93 houses : pop"* in 1841, 478 : 
ass**- propy- £2,328 : poor rates in 1838, £154. 8s. 

LUFFENHAM (South), Rutlakd, a parish in 
the hun**- of Wrangdike, union of Uppingham, on a 
branch of the Chater: 96 miles from London, 6 
from Uppingham, 8 from Oakham.-o«c>^(For access 
and postal arrangements, see above.) -o«s^ The 
church is an old Gothic structure, with some re- 
mains of Norman architecture; it has a square 
tower and spire.-oM>The living (St. Mary), a rec- 
tory in the archd'* of Northampton, and diocese of 
Peterborough, is valued at £12. 12s. 6d. : pres. net 
income, £423 : patron. Rev. J. Bush : pres. incum- 
bent, Panl Bush, 1847 : contains 1,230 acres: 56 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 317: ass*- prop''- £1,719 : 
poor rates in 1838, £124. 16s.^«c^The Hall, which 
is a handsome mansion, is now the residence of the 
Misses Wingfield. 

LUFFIELD, Bucks, an extra-parochial liberty, 
partly in the hun*- of Green's Norton, county of 
Northampton, and partly in the hun^ of the above 
county : 62 miles from London, 5 from Bucking- 
ham, 9 from Stony-Stratford.-o«»-Money orders 
issued at Buckingham: London letters deliT*- 9 
a.m.: post closes 6} p.m.-«Mo-In 1124, Robert 
Bossu, Earl of Leicester, founded a priory here, 
which was suppressed in 1494, on account of its 
funds not being sufficient for its support It was 
presented by Henry VII. to the ablxit of West- 




-Contains 450 acres: 1 house: pop"* in ' 



minster.^ 
1841, 5. 

LUFFINCOTT, Dbtoh, a parish in the hun* of 
Black Torrington, union of Holsworthj, on the 
eistem bank of Uie Tamar, and crossed by the 
Bude Canal : 230 mUes from London (coach road 
211), 8 firom Holsworthy, 7 from Launceston. 
-oM>-Gt. West. Bail, through Bristol and Exeter 
to Crediton, thence 30 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham and Bristol, &o., 244 mile8.^o«e^Mo- 
ney orders issued at Holsworthy : London letters 
deliT^ 1^ p.m.: post closes 11 a.m.-aM>-The liying 
(St James), a disch^ rectory in the archd^* of 
Totnesa, and dioeese of Exeter, is valued at £5. 6s. 
8d.: prea. net income, £67: patrons, J. Venner 
and J. Spottigne, Esqrs. : pres. incumbent, F. Par- 
ker, 1838 : contains 990 acres : 12 houses: pop*^ in 
1841, 93: ass^ props'- £203: poor rates in 1838, 

168. 

LUPPWICK. See Lowick. 

LUFTON, SoMEBSET, a parish In the bun'' of 
Stone, union of Yeovil: 161 miles from London, 3 
from TeoTiL-«*o.Son. West. RaiL through South- 
ampton to Dorchester, thence 20 miles: from Der- 
by, through Birmingham and Bristol to Bridge- 
water, 165, thence 20 miles.-«Mo>Money orders is- 
sued at Yeovil : London letters deliv^* 10 a.m. : 
post closes 4} p.m.^oM^The living (St. Peter and 
St Paul), a rectory in the archd''' of Wells, and 
diocese of Bath and Wells, is valued at £5. 78. 
Sjd. : prea. net income, £107 : patrons, T. Phelps, 
E^., and Trustees of late Dr. Tatum: pres. incum- 
bent, R. Phelps, 1827 : contains 280 acres : 4 
bonses : pop*^ in 1841, 21 : poor rates in 1838, 
£18. 18s. 

LUGWARDINE, Hebbfobd, a parish in the 
hun^ of Badlow, union of Herefonl, on a large 
branch of the Wye : 147 miles from London (coadi 
road 134), 3 from Hereford, 12 from Ledbury.-oM^ 
Gt. West RaiL through Stonehouse and Gloucester 
to Rosa, thence 15 miles: from Derby, through 
Birmingham to Worcester, 71 miles, thence 30. 
-oMs-Money orders issued at Hereford: London 
letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-«Mo-One of 
the schools here is endowed with the sum of £5. 
158. 6d. per annum; the other charities produce 
about £21 a year.«ow>-The living, a vicarage with 
the cnrades of Little Dewchurch, Heattard, Llan- 
garron, and St. Weonard*8 : it is exempt from visi- 
tations, being under the peculiar jurisdiction of the 
Dean and Chapter of Hereford: is valued at £22. 
7s. Id.: pres. incumbent, H. H. Morgan, 1838: 
contains 1,950 acres: 136 houses: pop°- in 1841, 
690: as8<L prop^* £3,815: poor rates in 1838, 
£241. Olthes commuted in 1840. 

LUKE*S (St.), Middlesbx, a parish in the hun^ 
of Ossulstone, Finsbury division : it includes the 
liberties of the Gty Road, East and West Finsbury, 
Whitecross Street, Golden Lane, and Old Street — 
(See LoiDOV.) -om>* Gontains 240 acres: 5,766 
bonses : pop"* in 1841, 49,829 * ass^ prop^- 
£138,356: poor rates in 1838, £15,801. 19s. 

LULLIN6STANE, Eskt, in the lower half 
hun^ of Axton, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, was for- 
merly a separate parish, but is now united. 

LTJLLIKGSTONE, Kent, a parish in the hun^^ 
of Axton, Dartford, and Wilmington, lathe of 
Sutton-at-Hone, union of Dartford, on the river 
rvL.nL 



Darent: 24 miles from I<ondon (coach road 20), 
7 from Dartford, 6 from Foot's - Cray .-^>«o^Nor. 
Kent Rail, to Dartford, thence 7 miles: from 
Derby, through London, &c., 156 miles, -om^ 
Money orders issued at Dartford : London letters 
deliv* 10 a.m. : post closes 7 p.m.-o*»-The chari- 
ties 'produce about £9 a year.-o«»-The living (St. 
Botolph), a disch*- rectory, with the vicarage of 
Lnllingstane, in the diocese of Canterbury, is 
valued at £7. 16s. 8d. : pres. net income, £350 : 
patron. Sir P. H. Dyke, Bart. : pres. incumbent, 
T. H. Dyke, 1818: contains 1,410 acres: 6 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 59: ass*- prop^- £1,519. 

LULLINGTON, Debbt, a parish in the bun*- 
of Repton and Gresley, union of Burton-upon- 
Trent : the parish includes the township of Coton- 
in-the-EImes : 139 miles from London (coach road 
124), 7 from Burton-upon-Trent, 8 from Ashby.-o«*- 
Nor. West. Rail, through Rugby and Leicester to 
Burton, thence 7 miles : from Derby, through Bar- 
ton, &c., 17 miles, -oao Money orders issued at 
Burton : liondon letters deliv^ 10 a.m. : post closes 
6} p.m.-eto-The charities produce about £6. 10s. 
per annum.-«M«>-The living (All Saints), a disch*** 
vicarage in the archd^' of Derby, and diocese of 
Lichfield, is valued at £4. lis. lOd. : pres. net in- 
come, £62 : patron. Lord Chancellor : pres. incum- 
bent, T. Echalaz, 1841 : contains 3,100 acres: 113 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 650: ass^ prop''- £2,502 : 
poor rates in 1838, £93. 158. 

LULLINGTON, Somerset, a parish in the bun'* 
and union of Frome: 116 miles from London 
(coach road 108), 3 from Frome, 10 from Bath. 
-«M»^Gt. West. Rail, to Bath, thence 10 miles: 
from Derby, through Birmingham and Bristol to 
Bath, &c., 153 miles.-o«=»Money orders issued at 
Frome : London letters deliv*^- 9 a.m. : post closes 
5) p.m.-e«e^The charities produce about £3 per 
annum.-o«9^The living (All Saints) is a perpetual 
curacy in the archd^* of Wells, and diocese of Bath 
and Wells : pres. net income, £63 : patron, R. H. 
Cox, Esq. : pres. incumbent, W. M. H. Williams, 
1848: contains 840 acres: 28 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 139 : ass'- props'- £1,163 : poor rates in 1838, 
£86. 

LX7LLINGT0N, Sussex, a parish in the bun'- 
of Alceston, rape of Pevensey, union of Eastbourne, 
on the eastern bank of the river Cuckmere : 61 
miles from London (coach road 59), 4 from Sea- 
ford, 9 from Lewes.-oM»> Brighton Rail, tlirougb 
Lewes to Berwick station, thence 3 miles: from 
Derby, through London, &c., 193 miles. ^o«c» 
Money orders issued at Lewes: London letters 
deliv^ 9} a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-eM»^The living, 
a disch'* vicarage in the archd''' of Lewes, and dio- 
cese of Chichester, is valued at £6. 12s. lid. : pres. 
net income, £28: patron. Bishop of Chichester: 
pres. incumbent, Henry Kelson, 1840: contains 



ass' 



d. 



§60 acres: 8 houses: pop"* in 1841, 39: 
props'- £762: poor rates in 1838, £11. 9e. 

LULLWORTH (East), Dorset, a parish in the 
hun^ of Winfrith, union of Wareham and Purbeck, 
Blandford division of the county : 146 miles fi-om 
London (coach road 117), 7 from Wareham, 16 
from Dorchester. -o«»- Sou. West. Rail, through 
Southampton to Dorchester, thence 16 miles : from 
Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, and Reading, to 
Dorchester, &c., 246 miles. -o«o- Money orders 



issTied at Wareham : London letters deliT^- 9 a.m.: 
post closes 7 p.ni.-oM>*There is a neat Roman Ca- 
tholic chapel here. The charities produce ahout 
£61 per annam. Within the parish of Lullworth, 
nnmeious relics of antiquity have heen discovered^ 
and on a lofty hill, called Flower's Barrow, there 
is a triple intrenchment, enclosing an area of ahout 
five acres, which Auhrey supposes to have heen a 
British camp.-<eM».Th6 living (St. Andrew) is a 
vicarage in the diocese of Barnm : pres. net income, 
£109 : patron, J. Weld, Esq. : pres. incumhent, J. 
U. Cooke, 1835 : contains 2,860 acres : 67 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 392: ass*- prop^- £1,660: poor rates 
in 1838, £56. 58. Tithes commuted in 1839. 
-<MoLullworth Castle, the great ornament of this 
part of the country, and the seat of the eminent 
Boman Catholic family of the Welds, stands close 
to the village. It is a massive cuhe of 80 feet od 
each side, with a round tower at each comer. Xt 
was begun in 1588, and finished in 1641, when it 
became, by purchase, the property of the family by 
whom it is now held. The interior is magnifi- 
cently Aimished, and around it stretches an exten- 
sive and beautifol park. Joseph Weld, Esq., the 
proprietor of this splendid domain, who married the 
Hon. Charlotte Elizabeth, a daughter of Charles 
Philip, sixteenth Lord Stourton, derives descent 
from Edric, sumamed Wild, or Sylvatrius, who 
was nephew to Edric, duke of Mercia, husband of 
Edina, daughter of Ethelred, king of England, whose 
descendants, through this long course of ages, have 
intermarried with the first families in the kingdom. 
Mr. Weld, who has another seat at Pilewell, in 
Hampshire, succeeded his brother, the late Thomas 
Weld, Esq., who, upon the decease of his wife, 
became a Catholic clergyman, and ultimately at- 
tained to the dignity of a cardinal, being the first 
Englishman that had ever obtained a seat in the 
conclave since the pontificate of Clement IX. 

LULLWORTH (West), Dorset, a chapelry on 
the shore of the English Cliannel, in the liberty of 
Bindon, locally within the hun^- of Winirith, 
Blandford division of the county: 119 miles from 
London, 9 from Wareham, 14 from Weymouth. 
-«Mo> (For access and postal arrangementa, see 
above.)-««o-There is a great natural curiosity here, 
called Lullworth Cove, which communicates with 
the sea through a deep channel, being covered in, 
and overhung by, lofty and ragged rocks. The 
arched rock, which stands about a mile from the 
cove, has an opening about 20 feet high, appa- 
rently worn by the long-continued action of the 
waves at a long past era. Many of the inhabitants 
of this part of the coast gain a livelihood in con- 
stant peril, through gathering the eggs laid by the 
razorbill and the puffin on these rocks. -e*^The 
living is a curacy, annexed to the rectory of Win- 
frith-Kewburgh: contains 3,240 acres : 90 houses: 
pop^- in 1841, 407 : ass*- prop^- £721 : poor rates 
in 1838, £191. 3s. 

LULSLEY, Worcester, a chapelry on the 
southern bank of the Teme, in the parish of Suck- 
Icy — (which see for access, &c.): 119 miles from 
London, 8 from Worcester, 6 from Great Malvern. 
-<wo>Money orders issued at Worcester: London 
letters deliv*- 9 a.m. : post closes 51 p.m.-o^c^Hops 
are cultivated to a considerable extent in this par- 
ish.-o«»^The living is a curacy, annexed to the 



rectory of Suckley : contains 760 acres: 25 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 120: ass'- props'- £949 ; poor rates 
in 1838, £61. 

LUM3T. See Uuddlestokb with Lumby. 

LUMLEY (Great), Durham, a chapelry on the 
eastern bank of the Wear, in the parish of Chea- 
ter-le-Street — (which see for access, &c.): 264 
miles from London, 6 from Durham, 2 from Ches- 
ter-le-Street.-oM:>- Money orders issued at Durham : 
London letters deliv^- 8} a.m.: post closes 8 p.m. 
-o«>>Lumley Hospital was founded by John Duck, 
Esq.; the other charities produce about £50 a 
year. There are several extensive collieries in 
the chapelry.-o«>Contains 1,730 acres: 411 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1 ,796 : probable pop»- in 1849, 2,066 : 
ass*- pitopy- £8,922: poor rates in 1837, £268. 
lis. 

LUMLEY (Little), Durham, a township on the 
southern bank of the river Wear, in the parish of 
Chester-le^Street: 263 miles from London, 5 firom 
l!)urham, 10 from Sunderland.-o«9^(For access and 
postal arrangements, see above.) -e*e- Contains 
750 acres : 7d houses : pop*^ in 1841, 381 : poor 
rates in 1838, £61. 6s.-o*o.Lumley Castle, one of 
the seats of the Earl of Scarborough, is a magnifi- 
cent baronial structure, standing on a fine elevated 
situation, the land of which rises gradually, on the 
south and west, from the bosom of the river Wear; 
the east front is near the brow of a height which 
overlooks a deep and well-wooded valley, through 
which the Beck, a bum or mountain streamlet, 
winds towards the river. This stately mansion 
forms a quadrangle, with an area in the centre. 
At each angle there are projecting turrets, of an 
octangular form, which overhang Uie face of each 
square at the base, and are machicolated for the 
purpose of beating off any assailants, and which 
give to the whole building a singular but very 
imposing appearance. The whole structure is 
formed of yellow freestone, which wears a very 
bright and beautifrd tint at a distance. The chief 
entrance to the castle is in the west front, by a 
noble double flight of steps, and a platform, filling 
the whole space between the towers. The south 
front, which is modem, is brought almost parallel 
with the faces of the towers. The front to the 
north is obscured by Qffices ; but towards the east 
the castle retains all its ancient form, and wears a 
most august appearance; its projecting gateway, 
commanded by turrets and a machicolated gallery, 
being very bold and stately. Above this gate 
there are six shields with armorial bearings, deeply 
carved in stone, with their crests contemporary 
with the building. By these we ascertain that 
Sir Ralph .de Lumley obtained from Richard II., 
as well as from the Bishop of Skirlaw, permission 
to repair his castle here, to build a wall with mor- 
tar and stone, and to embattle the stmcture. The 
original fabric was constructed in the time of 
Edward I. by Sir Robert Lumley, and was en- 
larged by his son, Sir Marmaduke. There are 
three stories in this east front, having mullioned 
windows, guarded with iron ; a narrow space for a 
terrace, between the walls and the brink of a preci- 
pice, is guarded by a curtain. The whole arrange- 
ment and appearance of this front sufficiently 
indicate it to have been part of the original struc- 
ture, and a grand model of the taste of the age. 



LUN 



131 



LUP 






On eTeryside of the castle, splendicl, extensiTo, and 
varied prospects abound, oompriBing almost eyeiy 
feature that could be desired in landscape sceneiy. 
The castle is superbly famished, and contains a 
great number of higUy Talnable and interesting 
family portraits. The noble &mily of Scarborough 
derire their descent from Liulph, son of Osbert de 
Lumley, who married Elgitha, daughter of Alfred, 
Earl of Northumberland, by Edgina, daughter of 
Ethehed II. This Liulph was a nobleman of 
great popularity in the time of Edward the Cbn- 
feflsor, and was murdered by Leoferiso, chaplain 
to Walcher, bishop of Durluun, which so exasper- 
ated the populace that they sacrificed both the 
prelate and Ids follower in their resentment. The 
eldest son of Liulph assumed the surname of Lum- 
ley, and from him was descended the Bir Robert 
Lumley spoken of aboYe, who was summoned to 
parliament as one of the barons of the realm, but 
who died on the field of battle during the rebellion 
of Thomas de Holland, Earl of Kent, in the early 
part of the fifteenth century. He was attainted, 
but his property was restored to his son, 8ir John 
Lumley, who did homage to Henry YI. for the 
return of his estates : and the son of that gentle- 
man again obtained the barony. From him was 
descended John, Lord Lumley, who was one of the 
peers that sat in judgment upon the unfortunate 
Ifary Queen of Scots, and Devereux, Earl of 
Essex. He died childless, and with him the 
barony expired, but the estates devolyed on his 
kinsman, Bir I^chard Lumley, who was, in 1628, 
elevated to the peerage of Ireland by the title of 
Yiseount Lumley. This nobleman was a zealous 
adherent of Charles I., and one of Prince Albert's 
principal commanders during the civil war. His 
son lUchard, the second viscount, was enrolled 
among the barons of England in 1681, in 1689 
was created Viscount Lumley of England, and, in 
the following year, was elevated to the earldom 
of Scarborough. From him the present noble pro- 
prietor of Lumley is the eighth in descent. His 
lordship has another seat in Yorkshire, called 
Sandbeck Castle. 

LUND, LurcASTER, a chapelry at the mouth of 
the Ribble, in the parish of Kirkham — (which see 
for access, Sao,) ' 223 miles from London, 3 from 
ffiTkham, 6 horn Preston. xMo-Money orders is- 
sued at Kirkham t London letters deliv^* 9 jr a.m. : 
post closes 3^ p.m.-<3«>-The living, a perpetual 
curacy in the diocese of Manchester, is valued at 
£6. 18s. 4d.r pres. net income, £342: patron, 
Christ Church, Oxford : pres. incumbent, Bichard 
Moore, 1620. — (Pop*- returned with the parish.) 

LUND, East Rronro, Yobx, a parish in the 

wapentake of Harthill, union of Beverley, Bainton- 

BeacoQ division: 199 miles from London (coach 

road 187), 7 from Beverley, 8 from Great Drif- 

fieId.-««>-6t Nor. Rail, through Peterborough, 

Boston, and Hull, to Beverley, thence 7 miles: 

from Derby, through Normanton, Selby, HuU, &c., 

128 miles.'o«s^Money orders issued at Beverley : 

London letters deliv^ 11} a.m. ; post closes 5 p.m. 

•^ao^Tht living (All Saints), a disch** vicarage in 

die archd^< of the east riding and diocese of York, 

is valued at £6. 6s. Jd. : pres. net income, £188 : 

patron, C. Grinston, Esq. : pres. incumbent, J. 

fiUnchaid, 1827: contains 2,950 acres: 74 



houses : pop" in 1841, 419 : ass'*- prop^- £3,742 : 
poor rates in 1838, £107. 6s. Tithes commuted 
in 1794.-3«c^Fair, fourth Thursday in Lent. 

LUND. Bee Clifp with Lund. 

LUNDY (IsLAin) op), Devon, in the bun** of 
Braunton, situated at the mouth of the Bristol 
Channel : 245 miles from London, 12 from Hart- 
land Point, 32 from Tenby.-o«c-This island is 
about three mUes in length and one in breadth, and 
comprises nearly 2000 acres. It is almost inac- 
cessible, being environed by lofty rocks, one of 
the cliffs rising to the elevation of 800 feet above 
the sea-level, and is surmounted by a lofty pira- 
midal rock, called the Constable. Lundy was at 
one time the stronghold of pirates — one of the 
most celebrated of whom, William de Morisco, 
after an unsuccessful attempt upon the life of King 
Henry III., fled here, and was enabled to establish 
himself for some time, but was at length taken, 
and suffered death with sixteen of his followers. 
Lambard, in speaking of the island, says — King 
JEduHtrdlL^perstuxded of the strengthe of this islande^ 
ond flying the persecution of hdbeU, his wife^ and the 
ndbilytie that assisted her, intended to have entered 
the samey hut he was dryven hacke withe a contrarye 
mnde, and beaten into Glamorganshyre, wheare he 
lurhed for a tyme in the abbey of NetJ*^, beinge put 
in comforte by the Welshemen that he should abyde 
theare unespyed, which notwithstanding weare in 
ihende hyred for Juda^s rewarde (a Utile money I 
should say) to betraye him theyr sovtraigne maisier, 
* During the civil war the castle was held by Lord 
Saye and Scale for the king ; and in the reign of 
William it fell for some time into the hands of the 
French.^ The island is indeed only accessible on 
one, the eastern side, where a small beach, shel- 
tered by some detached rocks, called the Isle of 
Rats, admits of a safe approach. There is a man- 
sion on the island with usual out-offices, a black- 
smithes forge, and several labourers* cottages. 
Lundy is famous for its butter, and some cattle are 
reared upon it; and there is, besides, an abun- 
dance of rabbits. Within these few years a vein 
of silver and copper has been discovered, and the 
mine is likely to prove of considerable value. The 
island has always been of great importance to the 
Bristol traders, and a fine lighthouse has beeii 
erected for their accommodation. 

LUNE-DALE, Nobth Riding, York, a township 
in the parish of Romald-Eirk — (which see for iaccess, 
&c.) — south of the river Tees: 257 miles from 
London, II from Barnard-Castle, 10 from Brough. 
-a9c>-Money orders issued at Darlington : London 
letters dehv*'* 2 p.m.: post closes 11 a.m.-oM^ 
Contains 21,680 acres: 60 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
339 : ass*' prop^- £2,256 : poor rates in 1838, £68. 
12s. Tithes commuted in 1811. 

LUNT, Lancasteb, a township in the parish of 
Sephton — (which see for access, &c.) — ^n the river 
Alt ; 208 miles from London, 8 from Liverpool, 7 
firom Orm8kirk.-o«>-Money orders issued at Liver- 
pool : London letters deliv'* 10 a.m. : post closes 
4} p.m.-o*o^Contains 430 acres: 11 houses: popl- 
in 1841, 59 : poor rates in 1837, £61. 14s. 

LUPPITT, Devox, a parish in the bun*- of Ax- 
minster, union of Honiton r 189 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 163), 4 from Honiton, 12 from 
Axminster.«o*<»-Qt West. Rail, through Bristol to 



\ 



LUP 



132 



LUT 



Tiverton Junction, thenco 10 miles : from Derby» 
through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 201 milefl.-o*o- 
Money orders issued at Honiton : London letters 
deliv^' 8 a.m. : post closes 5} p.m.^e»ei-The living 
(the Virgin Mary), a disch** vicarage in the archd'* 
and diocese of Exeter, is valued at £13. 6s. lO^d. : 
pres. net income, £121: patron, Mrs. Bernard: 
pres. incumbent, J. Cabbell, 1796 : contains 4,730 
acres: 139 houses: pop*"- in 1841, 782: ass'-prop^* 
£6 : poor rates in 1838, £363. 

LUPTON, Westmoueland, a township in the 
parish of Kr\|)y-Lonsdale — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 255 miies from London : 3 from KiriLby-Lons- 
dale, 9 from Kendal.-<»«oi-Moncy orders issued at 
Kirkby-Lonsdale : Ix)ndon letters deliv'*- 10 a.m. : 
post closes 3 p.m.-o«»^Contains 4,970 acres: 38 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 285: Asa^ prop"- £3,356: 
poor rates in 1837, £182. 5s. 

LUR6ERSHALL (or Luroasall), Sussex, a 
parish in the hun^- of Rotherbridge, rape of Arundel, 
union of Medburst : 50 miles from London (coach 
road 47), 5 from Petworth, 6 from Medhurst.^e^s.- 
Sou. West. Rail, to Qodalming, thence 13 miles: 
from Derby, through Loudon, &c., 182 niiles.-e«> 
Money orders issued at Petworth : London letters 
dcliv*^ 8^ a.m. : post closes 5} p.m.-*Mo-The living, 
a rectory in the archd^* and diocese of Chichester, 
is valued at £8 : pres. net income, £235 : patron, 
Col. Wyndham: pres. incumbent, R. L. Martyn, 
1819: contains 4,990 acres: 93 houses: pop*^- in 
1841, 771: ass*- prop^- £2,218: poor rates in 
1838, £484. 14s. 

LUSBY, LiKcoLN, a parish in the eastern divi- 
sion of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, 
union of Homcastle: 133 miles from London (coach 
road 132), 4 from Spilsby, 6 from Homcastle.-«Mo- 
Gt. Nor. Rail, through Peterborough ^nd Boston 
to Firsby station, thence 10 miles. -<^o- Money 
orders issued at Spilsby : London letters deliv** 9 
a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o«o-The living (St. Peter), 
a disch*** rectory in the archd''- and diocese of Lin- 
coln, is valued at £8. Hs. : pres. net income, £200: 
patron, Mrs. Brackenbury : pres. incumbent, B. D. 
Bogie, 1828: contains 760 acres: 26 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 148: ass*- prop^- £1,289: poor 
rates in 1838, £92. 5s. 

LUSTLEIGH, Devon, a pai-ish in the hun*- of 
Teignbridge, union of Newton- Abbot, on the river 
Wrey: 205 miles A-om London (coach road 183), 
6 from Chudleigh, 11 from Exeter. ■ a>c» Gt. West. 
Rail, through Bristol to Crediton, thence 5 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 
219 miles. -oAo-Money orders issued at Chudleigh : 
London letters deliv*'* 9} a.m. : post closes 3) p.m. 
"<Mo-The living, a rectory in the archd^- of Totness, 
and diocese of Exeter, is valued at £16. 7s. 6d. : 
pres. net income, £154 : patrons, Earl of Ilchester 
and Hon. P. C. Wyndham : pres. incumbent, Fred. 
Ensor, 1847: contains 2,830 acres: 56 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 311: ass*- prop''' £1,474: poor 
rates in 1838, £208. Is. 

LUSTON, Hereford, a township in the parish 
of Eye — (which see for access, &c.) : 138 miles 
from London, 3 from Leominster, 10 from Ludlow. 
-<9«o-Money orders issued at Leominster : London 
letters deUv*- 10 a.m.: post closes 2 p.m. o *e . 
Contains 93 houses: pop"* in 1841, 445: ass*- 
prop^- £2,802 : poor rates in 1837, £85. 19s. 



LUTON, Bedford, a parish and market town in 
the bun*' of Flitt, union of Luton : the parish com- 
prises the hamlets of East and West Hyde, Lee- 
grave or Lightgrave, Limbury-cum-Blscott, and 
Stopsley : 53 mUea from London (coach road 31), 
5 from Dunstable.*o*o^Nor. West. Rail, to Dunsta- 
ble, thence 5 miles : from Derby, through Rugby 
to Dunstable, 89 miles.-«»M»-Money orders issued 
here : London letters deliv** 8 a.m. ; post closes 
6.50 p.m.-«Mo>The town of Luton is pleasantly 
situated on the banks of the river Lea — ^which 
rises at Leagrove, an adjacent hamlet — and for- 
merly consisted principally of three streets, which 
diverge obliquely from the market-house, which 
stands in the centre ; but within the last four or 
five years, not less than twenty new streets have 
been added to them. It is supposed to have existed 
in the time of Offa. The church is a fine old 
Gothic structure, with a square embattled iower, 
composed of chequered flint and stone ; the intetior 
consists of a nave and aisles, separated by low 
pointed arches, north and south chapels and a chan- 
cel, containin<r some handsome monuments, and a 
fine painting by Fuseli, presented by the Marquis 
of Bute. Luton is celebrated for the manufacture 
of straw-hats and bonnets, for which there are 
several splendid establishments, which have busi- 
ness connections in all parts of the world. There 
is also a large iron and brass foundry, a gtts estab- 
lishment, and an excellently arranged fire-brigade, 
consisting of two bodies of thirteen men each, 
established when Bedfordshire was so much devas- 
tated with incendiary fires. A handsome town- 
hall has lately been erected at the junction of the 
Luton and Bedford roads. The Baptists, Wesley- 
ans, and Independents, all have chapels here. The 
parochial charities produce about £120 a year. 
Luton is a polling-place for the county. A work- 
house has been erected here, which is capable of 
containing 300 Inmates. The Luton poor-law 
union comprises 15 parishes, spread over an area 
of seventy square miles. About a mile and a half 
to the east of the town lies Luton Park, at one 
time a seat of the Marquis of Bute, but now the 
property of Charles Thomas Wards, Esq. of dap- 
ton House, near Warwick. The mansion, which 
was nearly destroyed by fire about five years ago, 
stands on an eminence in the centre of the park, 
which is about 1,300 acres in extent, finely tim- 
bered, and adorned with all those ornamental fea- 
tures which, with their farm-houses, farm-lodges, 
meandering streams, and thick plantations, render 
the residences of the higher classes in England bo 
delightful. Near Luton Park are the remains of 
Summerie's tower, the last of a castellated mansion 
built by John de Wenlock.-a9c>.The living (the 
Virgin Mary), a vicarage, with the curacy <^ East 
Hyde, is valued at £35. 12s. Id.: pres. net income, 
£1,350: patron, John King, Esq.: pres. incum- 
bent, W. M'Douall, 1827 •. contains 15,500 acres: 
1,073 houses: pop*- in 1841, 7,748: probable pop"- 
in 1849, 11,000: ass*^ props'- £4,605; poor rates 
in 1838, £1,706 10s. ^>«e- Market day, Monday. 
Fairs : third Monday in April and Oct. o»o Bank- 
ers: Sharpies, Exton, & Lucas — draw on BarcUy, 
Bevan, & Co. ; Branch of London and County Joint- 
Stock Banking Co. — draw on head ofiioe, 21 Lom- 
bard Street.-««»-Inn8 : Bell and Red Lion ; George 




I 



Hotel.-o«»>£a«t Hyde Park, the seat of Levi Ames, 
Esq., is Bitaated about three miles from the town ; 
Stockwood Park, also a fine domaini is the seat of 
Samuel Crawley, Esq. 

LUTON, Bedfohd, a town in the ahoye parish. 
-oM»-(For access and postal arrangements, see 
above.)-*Mo-Containa 768 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 
1,5 55. 

LUTTERWORTH, Leicester, a parish and 
market town in the hun*** of Guthlaxton, union of 
Lutterworth : 97 miles from London (coach road 
89), 8 from Rugby .-^a-e^Nor. West. Rail, through 
Rugby to Ullesthorpe, thence 2 miles : from Der- 
by, through Leicester to Ullesthorpe, &c., 44 miles. 
-ow>*Money orders issued here: London letters 
delix'* 7 a.m. : post closes 8^ p.m.-o«>The town 
is pleasantly situate on the banks of the small 
rirer Swift, oyer which there is a bridge, built by 
subficription in 1778. The streets are regular and 
well-payed, and much improvement has of late 
yean been made in their appearance, by the sub- 
stitution of new erections in place of the old struc- 
tures of two or three centuries gone by. The chief 
manufactures are those of the whole of this district 
— ribbons and hosiery. Lutterworth was formerly 
noted for the vassalage of its inhabitants ; and even 
as late as the year 1758, they were obliged to grind 
their com at one miU, and their wheat at another. 
This odious remnant of feudal tyranny was at last 
set aside by a legal decree ; and though several 
attempts were made, on different counts, to restore 
the privilege to the proprietors of the ancient mills, 
they proved ultimately altogether abortive through 
the spirit of the inhabitants. The parish church 
is a large and handsome building, with a nave, two 
aisles, a chancel, and a tower. John Wickliffe, 
the great and intrepid champion, who dared, in the 
fuU plenitude of papal supremacy, to dispute and 
gainsay the domination of superstitious selfishness, 
was presented to this living by King Edward IIL, 
and died here in 1387. In common with his great 
patron, the truly noble Lord Ciobham, who was 
roasted to death for his adherence to the faith, 
Wickliffe endured much persecution, and though 
he did not suffer a martyr's fiite, he was perse- 
cuted even after death, for after his body had lain 
in the grave for the space of forty-one years, his 
remains were ordered to be dug up by the Council 
Off Sienna, and after his bones were burnt, through 
the inveterate spirit of Romanism, they were com- 
mitted to the passing stream, to be by it distributed 
to the four winds of heaven, but only so to be re- 
instated in the full perfection of that glorious body, 
when he shall again, in the full plenitude of his 
personal and mental endowments, meet his dcfiim- 
ers at the judgment-bar of Gpd. The church con- 
tains also several beautiful monuments ; and one 
to the memory of the great reformer, from the 
chisel of Mr. Westmacott, Junior, has lately been 
erected in the chancel. A neat tablet of white 
marble records the virtues of the late excellent 
Bishop Ryder, who was at one time the rector of 
this parish* The Independents and Wesleyan 
Methodists have chapels here. A free school was 
endowed here in 1730, by the Rev. Edward Sher- 
rier, through the medium of which 100 boys are 
educated; the founder also leaving sufficient funds 
for paying four poor almsmen 78. each weekly. 



In 1815, also, Bishop Ryder founded and endowed 
a school for the instruction of poor girls in the ele- 
mentary branches of book education, and in needle- 
work, and other necessary domestic arts. The 
other town charities produce about £312 a year, a 
considerable portion of which is applied to paro- 
chial purposes. A court-leet is held by the lord of 
the manor, sometimes in January, and sometimes 
in October, at which two persons are chosen for 
town masters, and who have the sole care of the town 
lands, which produce about £240, which is chiefly 
applied to paving and improving the streets. The 
petty sessions for the hundred are held here. The 
Lutterworth poor-law union comprises thirty-sis 
parishes, with a population of about 15,000 persons, 
spread over 87 square miles.-o«o-The living (St. 
Mary), a rectory in the diocese of Peterborough, is 
valued at £26 : pros, net income, £585 : patron, 
the Grown: pres. incumbent, R. H. Johnson, 
1816 : contains 1,890 acres : 485 houses : pop°- in 
1841, 2,531 ; probable pop"- in 1849, 2,911 : ass*- 
prop^- £7,753: poor rates in 1838, £479. 13s. 
-o«o-Market day, Thursday. Fairs : Feb. 16, April 
2, Holy-Thursday, Sept. 16, Feb. 16, for cattle. 
-oMB. Bankers : Branch of Fare's Leicestershire 
Banking Co. — draw on Smith, Payne, & Co.^o*e>- 
Hind Inn, and Denbigh Arms Hotel. 

LUTLEY (or Ludlbt), Worcester, a hamlet 
in the parish of Hales-Owen — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.) : 117 miles from London, 3 from Stour- 
bridge, 8 from Birmingham, ^o^o- Money orders 
issued at Stourbridge: London letters deliv** 8 
a.m. : post closes 6 p.m.^occ^Con tains 25 houses : 
pop"- in 1841, 137 : ass*- prop^- £665 : poor rates 
in 1838, £59. 78. 

LUTTON (or Luddikotok-upoh-the-Wold) , 
Northampton, a parish, partly within the bun** of 
Norman Cross, county of Huntingdon, and partly 
in the hun*- of Willybrook, union of Ouudle, in 
the above county ; 98 miles from London (coach 
road 72), 6 from Oundle, 6 from Stilton.-o.c^Nor. 
West. Rail, through Blisworth and Northampton 
to Barnwell station, thence 3 miles : from Derby, 
through Weedon, Northampton, &c., 99 miles. 
<«*<»>Money orders issued at Oundle : London let- 
ters deliv^ 8J a.m. : post closes 8j p.m.-o«e-Tho 
living (St. Peter), a rectory, in conjunction with 
Washingley, in the archd''- of Northampton, and 
diocese of Peterborough, is valued at £21. lis. 
5id. : pros, net income, £220: patron, E. Fitz- 
william : pres. incumbent, F. Jones, 1809 : con- 
tains 1,520 acres: 38 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
187: ass*- prop^- £1,039: poor rates in 1838, 
£60. 18s. 

LUTTONS-AMBO, East Riding, YoitK, a town- 
ship, partly in the liberty of St. Peter of York, 
and partly in the parish of Weaverthorpe — (which 
see for access, &c.) : 207 miles from London, 10 
from New Malton, 28 from York.-«o«o-Money or- 
ders issued at Malton : London letters deliv*- 11} 
a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o«=»Contains 2,130 acres : 
78 houses: pop"- in 1841,405: ass*- prop^- £2,262: 
poor rates in 1838, £112. 18s. Tithes, moduses, 
&c., commuted in 1801. 

LUXBOROUGH, Somerset, a parish in the 
bun*- of Carhampton, union of Williton : 1 80 miles 
from London (coach road 161), 4 from Dunster, 6 
from Minehead.-o«=>-Gt. West. Rail, through Bris- 




tol to Taunton, thence 17 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 194 mileB.-<Mo- 
Money orders Issued at Taunton : London letters 
deliv*' 8 J a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-o«o-This is a 
yery valuable mineral district, and extensive works 
for the raising of iron ore, and the manufacture of 
the metals, both of iron and steel, have been estab- 
lishcd.-o«=»-The living (the Virgin Mary) is a cu- 
racy, annexed to the vicarage of Cutcombe : con- 
tains 3,450 acres : 78 houses : pop"- in 1841, 485: 
ass*- propy- £2,182: poor rates in 1837, £254. 
lis. 

LUXULION (or Ldthltan), Cokitwall, a parish 
in the ^nn*^ of Powder, union of Bodmin : 262 
miles from London (coach road 242), 4 from Lost- 
withiel, 7 from Bodmin.'«Mo>Gt. West. Rail, through 
Bristol and Exeter to Plymouth, thence 22 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 
280 miles. -o«o^ Money orders issued at Lost- 
withiel : London letters deliv*** 2 p.m. : post closes 
9 p.m.-aMa*The living (St. Cyricus and Julieta), a 
vicarage in the archd^* of Cornwall, and diocese of 
Exeter, is valued at £10: pres. net income, £177 : 
patron, Sir J. C. Rashleigh : pres. incumbent, B. 
G. Grylls, 1813 : contains 5,400 acres : 214 houses : 

?op»- in 1841, 1,512: probable pop»- in 1849, 
,|50: ass**- prop^- £3,768: poor rates in 1838, 
£445. 5s. Tithes commuted in 1839. 
LYDBROOK. See Lidbbook. 
LYDBURY(North), Saxop, a parish in the hun*- 
of Purslow, union of Clun : the parish includes the 
townships of Acton, Brockton-Doun, Eaton with 
Charlton, Eyton with Plowden, Lydbury, and Tot- 
terton: 166 miles from London (coach road 147), 3 
from Bishop's Castle, 12 from Ludlow. -o«o^ Gt. 
West. Rail, through Oxford and Worcester to Kid- 
derminster, thence 33 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham to Kidderminster, &c., 104 miles. 
-««oMoney orders issued at Bishop's Castle : Lon- 
don letters deliv^ 1 p.m. : post closes 12} p.m. 
-^•cxOne of the schools here is endowed with £15 
per annum. The other charities produce about 
£33 a year.-o«»-The living (St. Michael) , a vicar- 
age, with the curacy of Norbury, in the archd^- of 
Salop, and diocese of Hereford, is valued at £13. 
6s. 8d. : pres. net income, £551 : patron. Rev. J. 
B. Bright: pres. incumbent, J. B. Bright, 1800: 
contains 9,160 acres: 179 houses: pop"* in 1841, 
908: ass*- prop^- £8,722: poor rates in 1838, 
£424. 10s. 

LYDD (or Lid, in ancient records Hlyda), 
KsRT, a parish and market town in the liberty and 
union of Romney- Marsh, hun** of Lang^ort, lathe 
of Shepway, on the shore of the English Channel : 
91 mUes from London (coach road 71), 3 from 
'Romney. ^^•o- Sou. East. Rail, through Ashford to 
Rye, thence 9 miles : from Derby, through Lon- 
don, &c., 223 miles. -o«e»> Money orders issued at 
New Romney : London letters deliv^' 7 a.m. : post 
closes 6 p.m.-o«o^The ancient name of this place 
was Hlyda, and it formerly partook of the old pri- 
vileges of the Cinque Ports, being Joined with 
Romney, and possessing, by prescription, a cor- 
poration, consisting of a bailiff, jurats, and com- 
monalty, with very extensive powers of jurisdic- 
tion ; but it has not been included in any of the 
sections of the municipal act. It was at one time 
a seaport, as might well have been imagined from 



263 houses: pop" in 1841, 1,509: probable pop»- 

•* prop^- £18,131 : poor rates 



the circi\mstances which have just been stated; 
but in consequence of the vast accumulation of the 
shingle or\ this part of the coast, it now stands at 
least a mile inland, has irrecoverably lost its old 
status, and is but a trifling place, though still 
called a market town. The church is a fine edi- 
fice, and of very considerable antiquity. The Inde- 
pendents have a chapel here. The charities produce 
about £80 ^ year, the greater part of which is 
applied to parochial purposes. Dungeness light- 
house, which is 110 feet high, and was built by 
Mr. James Watt, on the model of E^dy stone, stands 
on the extreipe headland seaward of Lydd, and is 
a very valuable aid to the navigation of the English 
Channel, both eastward and westward of the point 
on which it hfis been erected. -o«o- The living (All 
Saints), a vicarage in the diocese of Canterbury, is 
valued at £55. 12s. Id. : pres. net income, £1,247: 
patron. Archbishop of Canterbury: pres. incum- 
bent, C. J. Bprton, 1821 : contains 11,660 acres : 

in 1849, 1,735: ass' 

in 1838, £831,->»c^Market day, Thursday. Fair, 
last Monday In July, for catUe. -om»- Inns : New, 
and George. 

LYDDEN (Kbst), a parish in the hun*- of 
Bewsborough, lathe of St. Augustine, union of 
Dover : 86 miles from London (coach road 66), 5 
from Dover, 11 from Canterbury. -««=>- Sou. East. 
Rail, to Dov^r, thence 5 miles : from Derby, 
through Londpn, &c., 218 miles.'OAc^Money orders 
issued at Doyer: Ijondon letters deliv*- 8 J a.m.: 
post closes 8} p.m. -«>«> Considerable springs rise 
here, which, ^frer a long underground course, fall 
into the sea between Folkestone and Dover, under 
the name of **Lydden Spout."-o«=»-The living (the 
Virgin Mary), a disch*- vicarage in the archd^* and 
diocese of Canterbury, is valued at £6. 6s. : pres. 
net income, $104 : patron. Archbishop of Canter- 
bury : pres. (ncumbent, C. Borckhardt, 1838 : eon- 
tains 1,460 acres: 24 houses: pop"- in 1841, 248: 
ass**- propJ^- £761 : poor rates in 1838, £28. 19s. 
Tithes commuted in 1840. 

LYDDINGTON. See LiDDnroTOW. 

LYDE. See Pipe ahd Lyde. 

LYDEARD. See Ltdiard (Bishop's). 

LYDFORD (or Lidpord), Devon, a parish in 
the hun^* of Lifton, union of Tavistock, on the 
river Lydd : 239 miles from London (coach road 
204), 8 from Tavistock, 9 from Oakhampton.-<Me- 
Gt. West Rail, through Bristol and Exeter to 
Newton station, thence 25 miles: from Derby, 
through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 253 miles.-e«(^ 
Money orders issued at Tavistock : London letters 
deliv*- 11 J a.m. : post closes 1 p.m.-o«c*-A town, 
under the name of Lyghatford, existed here long 
prior to the Norman Conquest, and was of consider- 
able size, until it was almost entirely destroyed by 
the Danes in 997. By the time of the accession 
of William I. in 1660, it had recovered so much of 
its former consequence, as to be taxed by him 
equally with London. In 1238, Richard, Earl of 
Cornwall, obtained a grant of the forest of Dart- 
moor, and the castle of Lydford, and about twenty 
years after that time, a weekly market and an 
annual fair were established; and twice during the 
reign of Edward I. the town sent representatives 
to parliament. Situated in the centre of a large 



mining cEstriot, Lydford early became a mart for 
tin, and money was ooined here, while the oastle 
became alike the scene of operations and the 
prison of the Stanaty Conrt, one of the most detest- 
able engines of legal power which was ever used 
in this country, and which the infamous Judge 
Jeffireya tamed to fearfnl account. Among o&er 
instances of its depraved exercise of authority, it 
assomed the right of trying and confining^ in 1512, 
Richard Strood, Esq., one of the parliamentary 
representatiyes of Flympton, ostennbly for a 
breach of the Stannary laws, but in reality to 
saying that the waters irom the mines injured 
Plymouth harbour. Lydford law was proTCibial | 
i<»r its harshness as late eyen as the end of the 
last century, and William Browne, one of Shak- 
speare's contemporaries, who Uyed when it was in 
nearly the ftdl exercise of its power, says of it — 

" I olt have heude of Lydfbrde lawe. 
Howe in the mome they hange and draws, 
And elt In Judgment after." 

Some portion of the walls of the castle still iemain. 
The yast compass of the parish comprises the ro- 
mantic and yaried waste of Dartmoor, now about 
to be brought into partial cultiyation ; and it also 
contains seyeral yery fine cascades, especially that 
of the Lid, amid its beautiftd and picturesque 
soeftery.-cMo^The liying (St Petrock), a rectory in 
the archd^- of Totness, and diocese of Exeter, is 
yalued at £15. Ids. 9d. : pres. net income, £160 : 
patron. Lord Chancellor: pros, incumbent, J. R. 
Fletcher, 1828: contains 157 houses: pop"* in 
1841, 1,213: probable pop"- in 1849, 1,395: 
ass^ prop'- £1,610: poor rates in 1838, £279. 14b. 
Tidies commuted m 1839. 

LYDFOKD (East), SomssBT, a parish in the 
htm'* of S(»itterton, union of Shepton-Mallett ) 134 
miles from London (coach road 117), 4 from 
Castle Carey, 6 from Somcrton. a« ei Qt. West. 
RaiL throagh Chippenham to Frome, thence 17 
miles : from Derby, though Burmingluun, Chippen- 
ham, &c., 192 miles. q»o Money oriden issued at 
Somerton: London letters deliy^ 10 a.m.: post 
doses 2} y.m. oo The liying, a rectory in the 
arehd^^' of Wells, and diocese of Bath and Wells, 
IS yalued at £7. 9s. 7d. : pres. net income, £135: 
patron, Rey. P. J. Newell r pres. incumbent, P. J. 
Newell, 1849: contains 706 acres: 44 houses: 
pop*^ in 1841, 194: ass'- prop'- £817 : poor rates 
m 1838, dc:82. lis. 

LYDFORD (Wnr), Bombbsbt, a parish in the 
hun'* of Catsash, union of Shepton-Mallett, on the 
riyer Brue : 119 miles from London, 5 from So- 
merton, 10 from Wells."c>M»-(For access, &o., see 
aboye.)'«M»Money orders issued at Somerton: 
London letters deliy'* 8J a.m. i post closes 4 p.m. 
-o*o.The parochial charities produce about £14 a 
year.-«M»-The liying, a rectory in the diocese of 
Bath and Wells, is yalued at £7. 13s. 4d. r pies, 
net income, £1,000: patron, E. F. Colston, Esq.: 
pres. hicumbent, W H. Colston, 1797 s contains 
1,900 acres: 58 houses: pop^ in 1841, 368: 
aas^ prop'* £2,539: poor rates in 1838, £226. Is. 

LYDGATE, Wbst Ridino, Yobk, a ehapelry in 
the parish of Rochdale — (which see for access, 
&c) : 3 miles from 01dham.^d«c>*The liying is a 
perpetual curacy in the diocese of Manchester: 






pres. net income, £150: patron, Vicar of Rochdale : 
pres. incumbent, Qeorge Cowell, 1835. 

LYDHAM, Salop, a parish, partly in the bun'* 
and county of Montgomery, and partly in the hun^ 
<^ Porslow, union of Clun, in the above county : 
the parish includes the township of Aston: 168 
miles from London (coach road 161), 2 from 
Bishop's Castle, 9 from Montgomery. -<mo. Qt. 
West. Rail, through Oxford and Worcester to Kid- 
derminster, thence 35 miles : from Derby, through 
Birmingham, KiddermiuBter, &c., 106 miles. «»» e* 
Money orders issued at Bishop's Castle : London 
letters deliv^ 12} p.m. : post closes 1 p.m.-<Me»- 
The Uying (the Holy Trinity), a rectory in the 
arohd^^* of Salop, and diocese of Hereford, is yalued 
at £10: pres. net income, £463: patron, SirC. 
W. A. Oakeley, Bart. * pres. incumbent, Arthur 
Oakeley, 1842 : contains 31 houses : pop** in 
1841, 198: ass^ prop^* £2,399: poor rates in 
1838, £149. 8s. 

LYDIARD (BuHOP's), Souersst, a parish in 
the western division of the hun^ of Kingsbury, 
union of Taunton: the parish includes the tith- 
ings of Bishop's-Lydiard, Coombe-Ash, East Bag- 
bcnrongh, East Coomb-Hill, Lydiard-Punchardon, 
and Quantock: 168 miles from London (coach 
road 146), 5 from Taunton, 10 i^rom Bridgewater. 
-oM>.Gt West. Rail, through Bristol to Taunton, 
thence 5 miles: from Derby, through Birming- 
ham, Bristol, &c., 182 miIe8.-««e^Money orders 
issued at Tatmton: London letters deliy^ 8} 
a.m. : post closes 7 p.m.-«M>-AlmBhouses for eight 
poor persons, each of whom receives 3s. per week, 
were founded here in the time of Charles I., by Sir 
Richard Grobham : present income of the charity, 
£127 per annum.-o«^The living (St. Mary), a 
disch'* vicarage in the archd'* of Taunton, and 
diocese of Bath and Wells, is yalued at £20. lOs. : 
pres. net income, £120 : patron. Dean and Chap- 
ter of Wells : pres. incumbent, F. Warre, 183o : 
contains 3,030 acres : 218 houses : pop"* in 1841, 
1,295: probable pop"* fai 1849, 1,487 : ass*- prop^- 
£6,522: poor rates in 1837, £693. lls.^o«^Fairs: 
Maroh 25, for bullocks, horses, and sheep; and 
Sept. 8, for toys. 

LYDIARD (St. Lawsbkoe), Soubrsbt, a parish 
in the bun** of Taunton and IViunton-Dean, unioh 
of Taunton : 178 miles fttim London (coach road 
149), 5 from Wiveliscombe, 8 from Wellington. 
-oM>-Gt. West Rail, through Bristol to Welling- 
ton, thence 8 miles: from Derby, through Bir- 
mingham, Bristol, &c., 192 miles.-«>M>-Money or- 
ders issued at Wiveliscombe : London letters deliv*- 
9 a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-<Mo-^The editors of Ly- 
son's * Magna Britannica,' in speaking of this place, 
say — In tilU year 1666, two larffe eariken pUchera, 
fidl cf vMdaUy in weight eighiy pounds each^ were 
digged iq9 by Idbourere wUh mattocke m pUmghed 
fiSdt; the one at Lawrenee-Lydiard, and the other 
within the parish of Stogumher, adjoining to it, «•» 
The living, a rectory in the arohd^^* of Taunton, 
and diocese of Bath and Wells, is valued at £22. 
6s. 8d. : pres. net income, £322 : patron, Robert 
Harvey, Esq.: pres. incumbent, James Crosse, 
1833: contains 2,720 acres : 139 houses: pop" in 
1841, 641: ass^- prop^* £3,579: poor rates in 
1838, £348. Ss. Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LYDIARD-PUNCHARDON, Souebset, a ham- 



LYD 



136 



LYM 



let in the parish of BUhop's-Lydiard — (which see 
for access, &c.) "««»-( Returns with the parish.) 
LYDIARD-TREG08E. gee LmiAKD-TiiB- 

OOOZE. 

LYDIATE, Lancaster, a township and chapelry, 
crossed hy the Leeds and LiTerpool Canal, in the 
parish of Halsall — (which see for access, &c.): 
208 miles from London, 4 from Ormskirk, 10 from 
LiverpooL^oee^Money orders issued at Ormskirk : 
London letters deliv"* 10 a.m. : post closes 4 p.m. 
-e«o-There are the remains of an unfinished ahhey 
here. The Roman Catholics have a chapel in the 
township.-sMxThe living is a perpetual curacy in 
the diocese of Manchester : pres. net income, £90 : 
patron, Rector of Halsall: pres. incumbent, R. 
Bickerstaff, 1841 : contains 1,940 acres : 124 
houses : pop"* in 1841, 848 : ass^* prop^^* £3,461 : 
poor rates in 1838, £50. lis. 

LYDLINCH, DoBSET, a parish in the hun^ of 
Sherborne, union of Sturminster, Sherborne diyi- 
fiion of the county : 135 miles fitMn London (coach 
road 115), 12 from Blandford, 9 ft«m Sherborne. 
we» Sou. West. Rail, through Southampton to 
Wimbome-Minster, thence 20 miles : from Derby, 
through Rugby, Oxford, Reading, Southampton, 
&C., 224 miles.-o«o.Money orders issued at Bland- 
ford : London letters deliv*** 10 a.m. : post closes 
5 p.m. o m o The charities produce about £82 a 
year, part of which is devoted to parochial pur- 
poses.'-Mo-The living (St. Thomas k Becket), a 
rectory in the diocese of Sarum, is valued at £14. 
5s. lOd. : pres. net income, £458 : patron, F. W. 
Fane, Esq. : pres. incumbent, R. J. B. Henshaw, 
1848: contains 2,157 acres: 60 houses: pop"- in 
1841, 419: a88<*' piop^"- £3,180: poor rates in 
1838, £163. Is. 

LYDNEY. See Lidket. 

LYDSINU, Kent, a hamlet in the parish of Gil- 
lingham — (which see for access, &c.): 34 miles 
from London, 5 from Chatham, 4 from Maidstone. 
-<Mo-Money orders issued at Chatham: London 
letters deliv*^ 8} a.m. : post doses 7^ p.m.-««e»'The 
living is a curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Gil- 
lingham: pop"- in 1841, 44. 

LYE (Uppeb), Hebeford, a township in the par- 
ish of Aymestry — (which see for access, &c.) : 146 
miles from London, 7 from Presteigpi, 10 from 
Ludlow.^e«a-( Returns with the parish.) 

LYE- WASTE, Wobcbster, a chapelry in the 
parish of Old Swinford — (which see for access, 
&c.) : 2 miles from Stourbridgfe."eM>-The living is 
a perpetual curacy, in the archd^^- and diocese of 
Worcester: pres. net income, £150: patron, Thos. 
Hill, Esq. : pres. incumbent, James Bromley, 1846. 
— (Returns with the parish.) 

LYFORD, Bebxs, a chapelry in the parish of 
West Hanney — (which see for access, &c): 63 
miles from London, 4 from Wantage, 7 from Abing- 
don.-«»M»-Money orders issued at Wantage : Lon- 
don letters deUv*^ 8 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-«M». 
There are some almshouses here, which were 
founded and endowed by Mr. Oliver Ashcombe. 
*>Mo-The living is a perpetual curacy in the dio- 
cese of Oxford, not in charge : patron, Worcester 
College, Oxford : pres. incumbent, Wm. Williams : 
contains 1,070 acres: 21 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
147: SM^- props'- £1,226: poor rates in 1838, 
£143. 5s. Tithes commuted in 1801. 



LYHAM, NoBTHOiiBEBLAXD, a township in the 
parish of CSiatton — (which see for access, &c.): 
324 miles from Iiondon, 4 from Belfbrd, 6 from 
Wooler.-<«M>*(RetumB with the parish.) Tithes 
commuted in 1839. 

LYMBERGH (Qbeat). See Limbbb. 

LYME-HANDLEY, Chbstbb, a township in the 
parish of Prestbury — (which see for access, &c.) : 
171 miles from London, 7 from Macclesfield, 8 
from Stockport.-«M>Money orders issued at Mac- 
clesfield: London letters deliv^ 10 a.m.: post 
doses 5( p.m.-oMi-Contains 3,920 acres: 34 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 268: ass^^ prop^^- £2,688: poor rates 
in 1838, £116. 5s. 

LYME-REUIS, Dorset, a parish, borough, and 
market town, within the boundaries of, although 
possessing separate Jurisdiction from, the liberty 
of Lothers and Bothenhampton, union of Axmin- 
ster, Bridport division of the county, on the shore 
of the English Channel : 163 miles from London 
(coach road 143), 9 from Bridport.-«Mo>Sou. West. 
Rail, through Southampton to Dorchester, thence 
22 miles: from Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, 
Reading, Southampton, &o., 252 miles.-«Mo-Moiiey 
orders issued here : London letters deliv'* 8 a.m.: 
post closes 5i p.m.-««e».Lym6 is situated on the 
little river Lyme, from which it derives its name, 
on the extreme borders of Devonshire, on the West 
Bay, in a cavity between two rocky hiUs ; its situa- 
tion on a declivity making part of il exceedingly 
difficult of access, and yet another part lies so low 
that, during high tides, the cellars in that portion 
are frequently inundated to the depth of 10 or 12 
feet. The houses, which are sbmewliat irregularly 
placed, are constructed of a bluish lagstone, and 
generally covered with slate. The river, which 
rises above Up-Lyme, runs through the middle of the 
town on a bed of rocks, dividing it into two parts, 
and then falls into the sea near Cobb-Qate. The 
earliest historical account which we have of Lyme, 
is in the time of Cenwulf, king of the West Saxons, 
who granted certain privileges for the snstenanee 
of the church ; but in the Doomsday survey we 
have a distinct intimation, that it was at that time 
divided into three parts, one of which belonged to 
the Bishop of Salisbury, anotlier to the abbey of 
Gkistonbury, and the third to William Belet. Ed- 
ward I. granted to it the privileges of a borough, 
and it was made by him part of the dower of his 
sister, the Queen of Scotland, and from that time 
it grew in dignity and importance, providing as 
many as four vessels and sixty-two tben towards 
the siege of Calais ; it shortly afterwaai^, however, 
declined. During the civil wara,Xyme remained 
steadfast to the parliament, and stood a siege by 
Prince Maurice. In 1558, it witnessed the first 
engagement which took place between the Spamsh 
armada and the English fleet; and, in lo72, a 
naval fight took place off the coast here, between 
the English and the Dutch, in which the latter 
were defeated. The town is also celebrated as 
having been the first scene of the unsuccessful re- 
bellion of the unfortunate Duke of Monmouth. In 
1668, Lyme was the birth-place of Mr. Thomas 
Coram, the projector of the Foundling Hospital, 
and also of Admiral Summers, who discovered the 
island of Bermuda. The great Cosmo de Medici 
died here in 1669, while on his visit to England. 



The oommeroe of Lyme appears to have varied 
rerj much at different periods ; bat it was cer- 
tainly mjKh greater at one time than it is now, for 
abont sixty years ago the customs duties amounted 
to £16,000 a year, but now they do not reach a 
fifth of that sum, notwithstanding the increase of 
the popuhition, and the increase of the number of 
rateable articles. The harbour consists of two 
artifidal piers, which enclose a basin. One of 
these is called Cobb, and was originally built as 
eariy as the reign of Edward III. The harbour is 
ehidly yalnable as a port of refiige in bad weather 
fbr small vessels. The church is a handsome 
stmcture, built chiefly in the later English and 
decorated styles of architecture ; it consists of a 
nave, choir, and* two side aisles; over the entrance 
there is an apartment which is used as a school- 
room. Two almshouses were built here in 1548, 
by Mr. John Tudbolt, mayor, for four poor fami- 
lies ; the other charities produce about £35 a yean 
As stated above, Lyme received certain privileges 
from James I., but it was not fully invested with 
all its prescriptive and chartered rights, until the 
thirty-third year of Elizabeth, when its incorpora- 
tion was completed. Under the Municipal Act, 
the borough is governed by four aldermen and 
twelve councillors, under the usual corporate style ; 
the new parliaraentary boundaries comprising the 
whole of the parish and the adjoining parish of 
Cluumonth. Lyme continued to send two mem- 
bers to parliament, from the twenty-third year of 
Edward I. till the passing of the Beform Act, when 
it was restricted to only 6ne.-aM>-The living (St. 
Michael), a disch^ vicarage in the diocese of Surum, 
is valued at £10. 5s. 7}d. : pres. net income, 
£275: patron, Prebendary thereof: pres. incum- 
bent, F. P. Hodges, 1833: contains 1,190 acres: 
423 houses: pop*- in 1841, 2,756: probable pop"^ 
in 1849, 3,169: ass^ props'- £5,351 .^•e^Market 
days, Tuesday and Friday. Fairs : Feb. 13, and 
Oct. 2.-<Me-Banker8 : R. & H. Williams — draw on 
Williams, Deacon, & Co.-«3«»-Inn8 : Three Cups, 
and Lion. 

LYMINOE, Rest, a parish in the hun*^ of 
Loningborough, lathe of Shepway, union of Elham : 
79 mUes from London, 3 from Elham, 4 from 
Hythe.^o«>-Sou. East. Rail, to Hytbe, thence 4 
miles: from Derby, through London, &c., 211 
miles. -«>M»^ Money orders issued at Canterbury: 
London letters deliv^ 11 a.m.: post closes 3 p.m. 
■■ CI One of the schools here is endowed with £10 
a year. Hops are cultivated to some extent in the 
purish.-oK».The living (the Virgin Mary and St. 
Eadbnrgh), a rectory and vicarage in the diocese 
of Canterbury, is valued at £21. 10s. : pres. net 
inoome, £625: patron, Rev. Ralph Price: pres. 
incumbent, Ralph Price, 1811: contains 4,320 
acres: 105 houses: pop"** in 1841, 941: ass^ 
propT' £3,569: poor rates in 1387, £332. 148. 
-o«o-Fair, July 6, for pedlery, 

LYMINGTON, Hahts, a parochial liberty, 
borough, seaport, and market town, in the parish 
of Boldre, east division of the New Forest, union 
of Lymington, situated on the west bank of the 
Lymington river: 100 miles from London (coach 
road 88), 16 from 6onthampton.^o«9-8ou. West. 
Bail tiirough Southampton to Brockenhurst sta- 
tion, thence 4 mUes : from Derby, through Rugby, 



Oxford, Reading, Southampton, &c., 189 miles. 
-o«o-Money orders issued here: London letters 
deliv*'- 7 a.m. and 4.20 p.m. : post closes 10 a.m. 
-e«s>-The earliest notice of this place occurs in the 
Doomsday-book, in which it is called Lentuncj or 
Jjiniatuny of which its present name is merely a 
corruption; but it rose into no importance until 
the time of Henry I., when it was made a port for 
the importation of French wines and other foreign 
commodities, and also became celebrated for its 
salt-works. In the twentieth of Edward III., this 
port contributed 9 ships and 159 men towards the 
fleet for the protection of the southern coast, which 
was more, by 4 ships and 63 men, than the quota 
contributed by Portsmouth. At that time, and 
long subsequently, the inhabitants of Lymington 
levied certain duties on articles imported from 
abroad ; but this was a fiscal right disputed by the 
authorities of the superior port of Southampton, 
and ultimately, after legal process, assigned to it, 
although pertinaciously persisted in by the inhabi- 
tants of lliis place, and frequently to their cost. 
At length, however, being, in the year 1730, sued 
by the mayor and corporation of Southampton, the 
defendants procured the removal of the cause to 
the county assize court, when a verdict was given 
in their favour, and the petty customs have in con- 
sequence ever since been levied here. In 1731, 
however, the trade of Lymington was seriously 
affected by the construction of a coffer-dam, which 
had the effect of reducing the depth of the waters of 
the port, so that, while vessels of 500 tons burthen 
could formerly approach the town, none larger than 
300 tons could anchor in the harbour afterwards. 
Perhaps this was not of so much consequence as 
it wordd have been, had Lymington been open to 
foreign commerce, but none but coasting vessels 
are now allowed to discliarge their cargoes here. 
The town is situated on the western bank of a 
creek or river, which falls into the Solent Chan- 
nel, and consists principally of one street, nearly 
half a mile in length. Excellent accommoda- 
tions have been provided for sea-bathing, and 
these, combined with the several attractions of 
the town and neighbourhood, have caused Lym- 
ington to be a place of very favourite resort 
during the summer months. The trade of Lym- 
ington consists principally in the exportation of 
salt, bricks, timber, and brooms, and in the im- 
portation of com, coal, and stone. The custom- 
house is in Quay Street, but the only duties re- 
ceivable here are those on coal and slate. There 
was formerly a considerable business done here in 
the manufacture of salt for the table, as well also 
as of the medicinal alkali which commonly goes 
under the name of Epsom salts — the works for the 
making of which are situated along the sea-shore ; 
but Liverpool and other enterprising places have 
now assumed the greater part of this business. 
Lymington has always been a useful port, and it is 
no uncommon sight to see, in the winter-time, from 
forty to fifty vessels at anchor at one time, waiting 
for a fair wind, and paying only a few shillings for 
harbour dues. The harbour at the bottom of the 
creek is excellent, and affords admirable shelter in 
bad weather for the fine vessels belonging to the 
gentlemen of the Royal Yacht Squadron. A gi-am- 
mar-school was founded and endowed at Lymiiig- 



ton in 1668, by Mr. George Falford of Fulfbrd, in 
Devonshire, who devised lands for that purpose; 
and, in 1688, a school-house was granted by the 
corporation, which, becoming dilapidated, waa taken 
down in 1782 ; about ten boys are instructed gra* 
tuitously on the foundation. In 1777, a bequest 
was made by Mrs. Anne Burrard for the endow- 
ment of another school, in which ten boys and 
ten g^rls are constantly instructed ; and Admiral 
Thomas Rogers, who died in 1814, bequeathed 
£1,000 to the parish, directing that the interest 
should be divided equally amongst ten poor men 
and women. The other charities are numerous, 
but of no great aggregate amount. The elective 
franchise was conferred by Queen Elizabeth, and 
has continued in exorcise ever since, the only al- 
teration made by the Parliamentary Reform Act 
being to enlarge the boundaries of the borough. 
Lymington is one of the polling-places for the 
southern division of the county. The Indepen- 
dents, Wesleyans, and Baptists, all have chapels 
here. On a neck of land or bank, to the south- 
west of Lymington, is Hurst Castle, a strongly-built 
fortress, erected by Henry Vlll. to defend this 
part of the channel between the main-land and the 
Isle of Wight. It consists of a circular tower, de- 
fended by circular bastions. In this castle Charles 
I. was confined previous to his removal to Caris- 
brooke Castle in 1648, about a month previous to 
his decapitation. It is now an important station, 
held by men in the Preventive service, and two 
lighthouses and a beacon are placed here for the 
benefit of vessels navigating along the coast. Ad- 
miral Lord Hawke resided for several years at 
Grove House, where several of his children were 
bom ; and Dr. Guidott, who revived the drinking 
of the Bath waters, was a native of this place.-o«»- 
The living (St. Thomas) is a curacy, subordinate 
to the viciirage of Boldre, in the archd^- and diocese 
of Winchester : contains 1,670 acres : 659 houses : 
pop'*' in 1841, 3,813: probable pop"- in 
4,385: ass^' prop''' £5,316: poor xtftos in 



1849, 
1837, 
£1,603. 12s.^o«c^Market day, Saturday. Fairs: 
May 11, and Oct. 2. -o*e>* Bankers : John West 
(the Lymington Bank) — draw on Rogers, Olding, 
& Co. ; Charles St. Barbe & Co. — draw on Lubbock 
& Co. ; Branch of Wilts and Dorset Co. — draw on 
London and Westminster Bank.-««c».Hote]B : Angel, 
and Nag's Head. 

LYMM (or Lyhn), Chesteb, a parish and village 
in the bun'- of Bucklow, union of Altringham, 
south of the river Mersey, and crossed by the Duke 
of Bridgewater's Canal : 187 miles from London^ 
5 from Warrington, 7 froni Nether-Knut8ford."OM>. 
Nor. West Rail, through Crewe to Warrington, 
thence 5 miles: from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 
87 miles.«o«o^Money orders issued at Warrington : 
London letters deliv**- 8} a.m. : post closes 8^ p.m. 
^o«o>The church is a very ancient structure, and 
there is also a Tery ancient cross here. The Wes* 
leyan Methodists have a chapel here. A gprammar- 
school was endowed here in 1698, by Sir George 
Warburton, and W. Domville, Esq., the income of 
which is about £80 a year.-*>»c>.The living (the 
Virg^ Mary), a rectory in medieties, id the archd^- 
and diocese of Chester : the mediety of Lymm with 
Warburton is valued at £11. Os. 7id. : pres. net 
income, £249 : contains 4,840 acres : 442 houses : 



pop"' in 1841, 2,658: probable pop"* in. 1849, 
3,056: as**- pTop^- £10,218: poor rates in 1838, 
£947. 18s.^e«e^Lymm Hall is the seat of the Bey. 
Mascie Domville Taylor. 

LYMPNE (or Luine), Kent, a parish, partly 
situated within the liberty of Bomney-Marsh, and 
partly in the hun^- of Street, lathe of Shepway, 
union of Elham, intersected by the Royal MUitaiy 
Canal : 78 miles from London, 3 from Hythe.-<Mo. 
Sou. Eatft. Rail, to Westemhangcr station, thenoe 
3 miles: from Derby, through London, &e., 210 
miles.^e«^Mouoy orders issued at Hythe : Lcmdon 
letters deliv^- 8 a.m. : post closes 8 p.m.-«M»-The 
church stands on the edge of a rook near the vil- 
lage, and is principally in the Norman style of 
architecture, with a tower rising from the eentre. 
The parish takes its name from the ancient river 
Limene, now called the Rother, a branch of which 
ran below it, and formed the Roman haven, called 
Partus Lmanua, The great military road, called 
Stane Street, which is still perceptibly straight for 
several miles, ran hither from Durovemum, the 
site of Canterbury. Formerly, at Shepway Cross, 
which is about half a mile from the church, the 
Limanarcha, or Warden of the Cinque Ports, was 
sworn in. A school here has a small endowment, 
and there is also a small almshouse here. At a 
short distance from the church is Stutiall Castle, 
now the residence of the Archdeacon of Canterbury, 
but formerly a stronghold or fort of the Romani; 
the walls are constructed of brick and flint. Seve- 
ral Roman coins have been found in the neighbour- 
hood. About the year 633, Ethelburga, a daughter 
of King Ethelbert, built a nunnery here in honour 
of the Virgin Mary, which subsequently became 
an abbey, and existed until about 964 ; but after 
the Danish invasion, it came into the possession of 
the Archbishop of Canterbury .-«3m»- The living (St 
Stephen), a disch*^ vicarage in the archd^- and dio> 
cese of Canterbury, is valued at £9. Is. 4d. : pies. 
net income, £183; patron, Archdeacon of Canter- 
bury : pres. incumbent, Edin Biron, 1840 : contains 
2,200 acres: 64 houses: pop"' in 1841, 606: assi'- 
prop^' £3,954: poor rates in 1838, £305. 68. 

LYMPSHAM, SoMsssET, a parish in the faun'- 
of Brent with Wrington, union of Axbridge, on the 
river Axe: 143 miles from London, 6 from Ax- 
bridge. -«M^ Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol to 
Weston-super-Mare, thence 5 miles : frx>m Derby, 
through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 157 miles.-e«>- 
Money orders issued at Axbridge: London letters 
deliv**- 8} a.m. : post closes 4 p.m.-e«o-The church 
has a very elegant tower. There is a Wesleyan 
chapel here. -o«>- The living (St Christopher), a 
rectory in the archd^- of Wells, and diocese of Bath 
and Wells, is valued at £38. 5s. 2^d. : pres* net 
income, £503 : patron. Rev. J. Stephenson : pres. 
incumbent, J. H. Stephenson, 1844: contains 
1,940 acres: 78 houses: pop"- in 1841, 567: ass"* 
prop^' £6,052: poor rates in 1838, £300. 4s. 
Tithes commuted in 1839. 

LYMPSTON, Devon, a parish in the bun^ of 
East Budleigh, union of St. Thomas, on a branch 
of the Exe : 182 miles from London, 4 from £x- 
mouth.-e«^Gt. West. Rail, to Exeter, thence 8 
miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, 
&c., 201 miles, o ao Money orders issued at Kx- 
mouth : London letters ddiv'* 9 a.m. : poet doses 




4i p.]D.-««»>The Tillage is pleasantly sitnated on 
the banks of the iiTer Exe, and the adjacent conn- 
try is Teiy agreeably diyersified. A small sam, 
the prodnoe of sereral bequests, is paid to two 
schoolmistresses for the instrocthm of children. 
The Weeleyan Methodists and Unitarians have 
ehapeb here -oao-Tbe living (the Virgin Mary), 
a leetory in the archd'* and diocese of Exeter, is 
valned at £15. 13b. 4d. •. pree. net income, £267 : 
patnm, T. Porter, Esq.: pros, inonmhent, 6. 
Porter, 1850: contains 1,790 acres: 226 houses: 
pop>*- in 1841, 999: ass<^ prop'* £3,377: poor rates 
in 1838, £269. 188. Tithes conunnted in 1839. 

LTNCH (or Libcb), Susbkx, a parish in the 
han^ of Eastbourne, rape of Chichester, union of 
MidhniBt: 49 miles from London, 4 horn Mid- 
lnirst.-<Mc»Son. West. Rail, through Guildford to 
Godslming, thence 13 miles: from Derby, through 
London, &s., 181 miles.-«Mc>-Money orders issoed 
at Midhuist : London letters deliv^ 9 a.m. : poet 
elosea 5 p.m.-««>-The living (the Virgin Mary], a 
leetory in the archd'- and diocese of Chichester, is 
valned at £3. 128. 8}d. : pres. net inccHne. £57 : 
patron. Earl of Egmont: pros, incumbent, J. E. D. 
Sarrsa, 1823: contains 190 acres: 14 houses: 
pop^ in 1841, 70: ass^ prop^ £588: poor rates 
b 1838, £96.^e«o.N., HoUycombe House. 

LYNCOMBE with WIDCOMBE, SovERSEfr, a 
parish in the hun^ of Bath-Foram, union of Bath, 
on the aouthem bank of the Avon, which separates 
It from the city of Bath : 107 miles from London, 
1 from Bath.^e«ca.€H;. West Bail, through Bath, 
thence 1 mile : from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Bristol to Bath, &c., 104 mile8.-oM>-Money or- 
ders issued at Bath : London letters deHv^ 7 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. : post closes 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. *3 « e» 
Tlie Kennet and Avon Canal passes through it, 
and the hills in the neighbouriiood are very pro- 
ductive of freestone. The church, which is in the 
later English s^le, was erected in 1831, at an ez- 
psnse of about £5,700. There is an hospital here 
for idiots, which is dedicated to St. Mary Mag- 
dalene; it has a chapel annexed, which, within 
these few years, was rebuilt by public subscription. 
-«*o.The living (Thomas i Becket) is a vicarage, 
with St. Mark's church, St. Matthew's church, and 
Dohnead chapel, annexed to the rectory of St. 
Peter and St. Paul, Bath: pres. net income, £750: 
patron. Trustees of Rev. C. Simeon : pres. incum- 
bent, Hon. W. J. Brodrick, 1839 : contains 1,700 
acres : 136 houses : pop*^ in 1841, 9,920: probable 
popF^ in 1849, 11,270: bms'^ pxop^- £18,546: poor 
rates m 1838, £2,681. 16s. 

LYNDHUB6T, Hahtb, a parish in the New 
Forest hun^ and union. New Forest division of the 
coonty : 89 miles from London (coach road 83), 8 
from Southampton. o»o Sou. West. RaiL through 
Southampton to Lyndhurst Road station, thence 1 
mile: from Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, Read- 
ing, Southampton, &(s., 178 iniles.-o«c>.Money or- 
dnrs issued here t London letters deliv'* 7 a.m. : 
post ehwes 9 p.m. ■ a « c» Prior to the time of Charles 
II., the jurisdiction of the chief-justice in Eyre for 
this forest was exercised here, where the forest 
courts, under the authority of the verderors, are 
still heU; one annually on September 14, and 
others as the judges may appoint. A house, called 
the King's House, Ib attached to the wardenship, at 



I 



which a stirrup is preserved, said to be one worn 
by William Rufus, when he was shot by Sir Wal- 
ter TyrreL A school here, in which sixteen chil- 
dren are instructed, is endowed with £26 a year, 
through a bequest of William Phillips, Esq. It is 
frt)m this place that Lord Lyndhurst takes his 
title. His lordship. Sir John Singleton Copley, 
whose father attained great eminence as a painter, 
and was elected a member of the Royal Academy, 
having been one of the most distinguished men in 
his profession as a barrister, speedily attained to 
aU the highest legal offices, was solicitor and 
attorney-general, master of the rolls, and ulti- 
mately, on the retirement of the Earl of EHdon, was 
constituted lord chancellor, and obtained his peer- 
age. His lordship, after being chief baron of the 
Exchequer, subsequently twice filled the same 
lofty position. The church of Lyndhurst is a 
small edifice ; it was rebuilt in 1710 by G^rge I., 
and in connection with it there are charities of the 
value of about £14 a year. The Baptists have a 
chapel here. Petty sessions are held at Lyndhurst, 
on the first Wednesday in every month. There 
are several finely-timbered parks in the neighbour- 
hood, which are laid out with great taste and judg- 
ment."o«&-The living (St. Michael) is a curacy, an- 
nexed to the rectory of Minstead : contains 3,560 
acres: 219 houses: pop"- in 1841, 1,386: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849, 1,594: ass*- proj^- £3,285: 
poor rates in 1838, £343. 18s.^»*oCnffnell8 is the 
seat of Sir Edward Poore, Bart., situated near the 
centre of the New Forest ; it possesses many pecu- 
liar advantages of scenery, and its bold irregularity 
of sur&ce, finely adorned with majestic oaks and 
noble beech trees, present some beautiful landscape 
efiects. The mansion stands on a rising g^und 
embosomed in trees, and possesses all the charac- 
teristics of an English gentleman's residence. It 
was some few years ago the residence of Sir 
(xeorgo Rose, who was twice here honoured with 
visits from Igng George III. and his Queen Char- 
lotte. The nouse contains many handsome apart- 
ments, and is embellished with some remarkably 
fine portraits of the gpreat men of the present and 
past age. Sir Edward, who is an officer in the 
army, derives his descent from Philip Poer of Am- 
bresbury, elder brother of Richard Poore, Bishop 
of Duiham, who laid the foundation of Salisbury 
cathedral, and died in 1237. From him was de- 
scended, throughout this long series of ages, John 
Methuen Poore, Esq., who was created a baronet 
in 1795, and was high sheriff of Wiltshire in 1797. 
The present baronet succeeded to the title and 
estates in 1838, on the death of his father. — Holly 
Mount is the seat of John Blagrave Bnlley, Esq. ; 
Newpark is the seat of Colonel ThomhiU ; Fox- 
lease, of James Mactaggart, Esq. ; Glasshays, of 
the Duo de Stacpool; and the Queen's House, of 
Thomas White, Esq. Besides these gentlemen, 
Captain Sir Charles Borrard, Bart., R.N. ; the 
Dowager Countess Erroll, Captain Breton, and 
Colonel Hogg, have residences hero. 

LYNDON, Rutland, a parish in the bun*'- of 
Martinsley, union of Oakham, on the river Chater: 
100 miles from London (coach road 94), 5 from 
Oakham, 5 from Uppingham.'«M».Gt. Nor. RaiU 
through Peterborough cmd Stamford to Manton 
station, thence 2 miles : from Derby, through Systou 



to Man ton, &c., 61 mile8.-««o- Money orders issaed 
at Uppingham : London letters deliv*^ 10} a.m. : 
post closes 1 p.m.-o»«=^The living (St. Martin), a 
rectory in the arcbd)"- of Northampton, and diocese 
of Peterhorough, is valned at £6. 17s. Id.: pres. net 
income, £180: patron, Rev. £. Brown: pres. incum- 
bent, T. K. Arnold, 1830: contains 860 acres: 21 
houses: pop"- in 1841, 100: ass**- prop^- £1,300: 
poor rates in 1838, £33. 98.-*Mc>-The Rev. £. Brown, 
of Lyndon Hall, as proprietor or lessee of the 
dean and chapter of Lincoln, is the only landowner 
except the rector. The Hall was built by Sir 
Abel Barker. William Whiston is buried in the 
churchyard. 

LYNEHAM, Oxford, a chapelry in the parish 
of Shipton-under- Which wood — (which see for ac- 
cess, &c.) : 75 miles from London, 6 from Bnrford, 
5 from Chipping-Norton.-o»c.-Mouey orders issued 
atBurford: London letters deliy^ 10} a.m. : post 
doses 3} p.m. ■^•o^ Contains 1,650 acres : 44 
houses: pop» in 1841, 248: ass**- prop^- £3,221 : 
poor rates in 1837, £180. 68» Tithes commuted 
in 1787. 

LYNEHAM (or Lineram) , Wilts, a parish in 
the hun^- of Kingsbridge, union of Cricklade and 
Wootton- Basset : 101 miles from London (coach 
road 93), 8 from Chippenham, 4 from Wootton- 
Bas8et.-o«o^t. West. Rail, to Chippenham, thence 
8 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham, Stone- 
house, Swindon, &c., 161 miles."o*e»Money orders 
issued at Chippenham: London letters deliT^- 9 
a.m. : post closes 8 p.m. -o*»- The living (St. 
Michael) is a perpetual curacy in the archd^^- of 
Wilts, and diocese of Sarum : pres. net income, 
£58 : patron, G. H. W. Hcneage, Esq. : pres. io- 
cumbent, E. H. Tompson, 1844 : contains 3,500 
acres: 195 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 1,317: prob- 
able pop"- in 1849. 1,514: ass^ prop^- £6,627: 
poor rates in 1838, £1,029. 3s. 

LYNEMOUTH (or Linmouth), Northumbbe- 
LAND, in the parish of Woodhom : ^0 miUs from 
London, 7 from Morpeth, 21 from Slnwick.^«Ma. 
Money orders issued at Morpeth : London letters 
deliv*^* 1 p.m. : post closes 12} p.m.-o««>^Contains 
4 houses : pop*^ in 1841, 31. 

LYNESACK and SOFTLEY, Durham, a town- 
ship in the parish of St. Andrew- Auckland — 
(which see for access, &c.) : 254 miles from Lon- 
don, 8 from Bishop's- Auckland, 18 from Durham. 
->»w»^Money orders issued at Bishop's- Auckland : 
London letters deliv*^* 11} a.m. : post closes 1 p.m. 
«>p This township, which comprises a hilly and 
barren track of country of great extent, commonly 
called South Side, does not contain any village, 
properly so called, but there are several detached 
clusters of dwellings. It is bounded on the south 
by the river Gaunless, or Wanless, and on the 
north by the Lyne burn. There are several col- 
lieries in the township.^o^s^The living is a per- 
petual curacy in the diocese of Durham : pres. in- 
cumbent, J. E. Jones, 1848 : contains 5,320 acres : 
160 houses: pop"- in 1841, 910: ass** prop^- 
£2,996 : poor rates in 1838, £215. 178. 

LYNFORD. See Linfoed. 

LYNG. See Liko. 

LYNN (North), Norfolk, a parish and rectory 
in the Marshland division of the bun*- of Free- 
bridge, union of King's-Lynn, on the western 



bank of the Ouse, near its mouth, and has sniFered 
frequently from inundations in that' river, one of 
which swept away the church: 97 miles from 
London, 1 from Lynn-Beg^s, 16 from Swaffham. 
-o*5i-(For access, &c., see LnfH.)-o*»-Money orders 
issued at Lynn: London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : 
post closes 5 p.m.-oM»The living is a rectory in 
the archd'* of Norfolk, and diocese of Norwich, 
with the perpetual curacies of St Margaret and St. 
Nicholas : patron, Dean and Chapter of Norwich : 
pres. incumbent, R. E. Hankinson, 1847 : contains 
1,080 acres: 8 houses: pop"- in 1841, 38: poor 
rates m 1838, £27. Tithes commuted in 1837. 

LYNN-REGIS (or Kiira*B-LYNH), Norfolk, a 
borough, seaport, and market town, having exclu- 
sive jurisdiction, though locally situated in the 
hun^ of Freebridge-Lynn, union of King's-Lynn, 
at the mouth of the Great Ouse river, on its eastern 
bank: 96 miles from London, 42 f^m Norwich. 
•«w:^Nor. and East. Co*- Rail, to Lynn station, 
115 miles: from Derby, through Syston and 
Peterborough to Lynn, 121 miles. -eM». Money 
orders issued here : London letters deliv^ 7^ a.m. 
and 4j^ p.m. : post closes 6 p.m. and 8 a.m.-<Mc>- 
This place, in Camden's opinion, was an ancient 
British town, and derived its name from the old 
term Ltfn, which was used to indicate a wide ex- 
panse of water, which is very significant of its real 
situation ; but Spelman, whose opinion is always 
of value, conceived that its name is of Saxon ori- 
gin, being derived from tlie word Lecm, meaning a 
tenure in fee or farm ; and it is certain that it was 
anciently called Len EpUcopi, or Bishop^s Lynn, 
from having been under ^e jurisdiction, both 
temporal and spiritual, of the Bishops of Norwich, 
who had a palace where Gaywood Hall now stands. 
During the reign, however, of Henry YIII., the 
ecclesiastics surrendered tlieir authority to the 
king, and it has ever since been called Lenne- 
Begis, or " King's-Lynn." During the contest 
between John and the barons, Lynn remained 
faithful to the king, who, on the petition of John 
Grey, bishop of Norwich, made it a free borough, 
and presented to the inhabitants a silver cup, 
richly gilt and beautifully enamelled, weighing 
seventy-three ounces, which is still preserveii by 
the corporation. In the sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries, the corporate authorities were re- 
markably active in persecuting and burning the 
poor old unhappy creatures who were stigmatized 
as witches ; and Hopkins, the brute of in&mous 
notoriety, who was for some time the main agent 
in this diabolical cruelty, found in Lynn and its 
neighbourhood abundant work for himself, espe- 
cially as very little proof was necessary of the 
g^ilt of those accused after his denunciation. 
During the civil war, Lynn was garrisoned for 
Charles I., and suffered a siege of three weeks by 
the parliamentary forces before it capitulated to 
the Earl of Manchester, by whom a capitation 
assessment of ten shilling^ per head was levied, 
amounting to £3,2(X), before it could be preserved 
from plunder. The river, on which the town is 
pleasantly situated, is here of great breadth, Lynn 
standing about ten miles from the North Sea : it 
extends about a mile and a quarter in length, 
and about a mile in breadth, and is intersected 
by four rivulets, locally called fleets, over which 




I 



I ' 



I 



there are nnmerotis bridges, some of them being 
wide enough for the passage of carriages. The 
town consists of three principal streets, nearly 
parallel with each other, from which several 
smaller streets divergre ; it is well paved, lighted 
with gas, and well sapplied with water, conveyed 
throagh iron pipes, laid down from the reservoir 
at Kettle Mills, in the north-eastern saburb. The 
booses have mostly an old and antique aspect, but 
still there are several modem erections inter- 
spersed, and in some parts handsome ranges of 
dwellings built, within these last few years, more 
in aocoidance with our present notions of taste 
sad comfort. This borough contains the parishes 
of South Lynn All Saints, and Lynn St. Mar- 
gazef s, the latter of which includes the wards of 
Chequer, Jew's-lane, Kettlewell, New-conduit, 
North-end, Paradise, Sedgeford-lane, Stone-gate, 
and Trinity-hall. The living of St. Margaret's is 
a perpetual curacy, with that of St. Nicholas, in 
the archdeaconry of Norfolk, and diocese of Nor- 
wich: gross income, £138: in the patronnge of 
the dean and chapter of Norwich. The church 
was founded about the beginning of the 12th cen- 
tury, and, though curtailed of its original dimen- 
sions, is still a noble pile. It is chiefly built of 
freestone, and has a nave, chancel, aisles, transept, 
and two fine towers, 86 feet in height, at the west 
end. The chapel of St. Nicholas, one of the hand- 
somest and 'most spacious in the kingdom, is a 
chapel-of-ease to St. Margaret's, erected in the 
14th century: it is in the Gothic style. The 
church of All Saints is an ancient cruciform 
structure: the living is a vicarage in the arch- 
deaconry of Norfolk, and diocese of Norwich: 
rated at £18. 6s. 8d.: gross income, £136: in 
tiie patronage of the Bishop of Ely. Numerous 
religious houses formerly existed here, but few 
remains of them are now visible. The Lady's 
chapel is an octangular tower, standing on a coni- 
cal mount, east of the town, called the Bed Mount, 
probably a corruption of the Rood Mount, and 
formcriy used for military as well as ecclesiasti- 
cal purposes. Here are Baptist, Independent, and 
Wesleyan Methodist chapels; Uie Unitarians, the 
Society of Friends, and the Roman Catholics, have 
also places of worship in the town. Lynn was 
early celebrated for its trading importance, which, 
indeed, was such, that in the 13th century the 
revenue paid to the Crown from the castoms dues, 
was more than two-thirds of that received from Lon- 
don. The limits of the port extend, in a northerly 
direction, from the promontory on which Hunstan- 
ton lighthouse stands, in a supposed right line 
north-north-west, to 14 fathoms of water; and like- 
wise from this line towards the east, until it falls 
in 14 fathoms of water at a point northward from 
the eastern end of the sand-hills, commonly called 
Burnham Meales; southerly, to a place in the 
channel of the harbour of Lyme, called White 
Friars Fleet, and to Gibbon's Point, opposite to it; 
thence down the river on the western side, and 
round the coast of Marshland to a point called 
Sutton Comer. The harbour is deep, and sufficient 
to accommodate 300 sail of vessels at a time ; but 
the entrance is somewhat dangerous, from the 
frequent shifting of the channel, and the nume- 
rous sand-banks ; and the anchorage is rendered 



difficult from the nature of the soil and the ra- 
pidity of the tide, which rises to the height of 
twenty feet. Of late years, many improvements 
have been made in the river and in the har- 
bour, by the formation of quays, jetties, and 
other necessary conveniences, for the shipping 
and landing of merchandise. To remedy the in- 
convenience which had been sustained by the silt- 
ing of the harbour, through the formation of the 
Bedford Level, a new cut was made from the river 
Ouse, called the Ewbrink Cut, with a view to 
divert the stream from the eastern, or harbour side; 
and near the north end of it, a handsome wooden 
bridge has been built, which leads into Marshland. 
In addition to this, a bridge over the river Nene, 
and an embankment at Cross Keys Wash, afford- 
ing a direct road from Norfolk and Suffolk through 
Lynn into Lincolnshire, was completed in 1831. 
The Purfleet, and common Staith quays, are the 
principal places for landing merchandise. On the 
former, where all foreign wines are landed, stands 
the Custom-house and Exchange, occupying the 
site of the ancient guild of the Holy Trinity. 
The Excise-office stands in High Street. Lynn, 
from its situation near the North Sea, and from 
the enjoyment of an extensive inland communica- 
tion by road, railway, and canal, has obtained an 
extensive foreign and coasting trade. Its princi- 
pal imports from abroad are — wine from Spain and 
Portugal; timber, deals, hemp, and tallow from 
the Baltic; com from Dantzic, Riga, and other 
localities on that part of the continent ; oil-cake 
from Holland ; and timber, of various kinds, from 
America. The coasting trade is more consider- 
able even than that with foreign countries, and 
consists chiefly in the importations from abroad, 
and agricultural produce, with which the surround- 
ing district is supplied. Shipbuilding to some ex- 
tent is still carried on in Lynn. The only other 
branches of manufactures hero are those necessary 
for the supply of sea stores, such as sailcloth, rope, 
and similar materials. A new market-house has 
lately been erected, with a range of six Doric col- 
umns forming an entmnce, above which there is a 
handsome Ionic colonnade supporting a pediment. 
The upper part of the building contains a spacious 
room for exhibitions, public meetings, and other 
similar purposes ; beneath there is an area, which 
leads to a space where the fish-market is held. 
The town, which, under the bishops, was governed 
by a provost appointed by thero, was first incor- 
porated by John. Under the new general muni- 
cipal act, a commission of the peace has been grant- 
ed, and six justices have been appointed ; the court 
of quarter sessions has also been established. The 
borough is now divided into three wards, governed 
by six aldermen and eighteen common councillors, 
under the usual corporate style ; the income of the 
borough is about £8,900 a year. The free gram- 
mar-school of Lynn was founded in the reign of 
Edward IV. or Henry VII., for the instroction of 
the sons of freemen in the Latin and Greek classics, 
but there are seldom more than one or two free 
scholars. There are several university exhibitions 
for the pupils of this school, but most of them are 
of minor value. To enumerate the several chari- 
ties would be beyond our limits, and it may there- 
fore suffice to state, that Gay wood's Charity, an bos- 




pitnl founded before the Reforroation, ha« an income 
of £357. lOs. per annum ; Framingham's Hospital 
has £332 per annum ; and St. James' Hospital 
has £274 per annum, all of them being under the 
trusteeship of the corporation. Lynn retumB two 
members to parliament. Lynn poor-law union 
comprises four parishes, with a population of about 
18,000 persons, spread over an area of nine square 
miles. Nicholas of Lynn, a celebrated mathe- 
matician, astrologer, and navigator, waa bom 
here, and became one of the Grey friars ; he also 
died, and was buried here, in 1639. William 
Browne, M.D., afterwards Sir William Browne, 
resided here ; he was President of the Ciollege of 
Physicians, and author of several works, chiefly on 
medical subjects. The custom of ushering in 
May-day by the blowing of horns, is still observed 
at Lynn.-««>The living (All Saints), a vicarage 
in the archd^* of Norfolk, and diocese of Norwich, 
is valued at £18. 6s. 8u. : pres. net income, £134 : 
patron. Bishop of £ly: pres. incumbent, T. B. 
Greaves, 1811: contains 2,620 acres: 2,707 
houses: pop*^ in 1841, 16,039: prob<able pop"* in 
1849, 18,445: ass^' prop)'- £26,180: poor rates in 
1838, £5,978. 14s.^»«>Market days, Tuesday and 
Saturday. Fairs: Feb. 14, for cheese, and Oct 
17.-«*<»-Banker8 : East of England Bank — draw 
on London and Westminster Bank; Everard & 
(3o. — draw on Bamett, Hoares, & Co.; Lynn- 
Regis and Norfolk Bank — draw on Prescott, Grote, 
& Co.; Gumey & Co.— draw on Barclay, Bevan, 

6 Co.-<Me^lnn8 : Crown, Globe, and Duke's Head. 
LYNN (West), Norfolk, a parish in the Marsh- 
land division of the hmi*** of Freebridge, union of 
King's-Lynn : 97 miles from London, 1 from Lynn- 
Regis, 16 from Swaffham. o» b (For access and 
postal arrangements, see above.)-<9«o-The living (St. 
Peter), a rectory in the archd^- and diocese of Nor- 
wich, is valued at £9 : pres. net income, £493 : 
patron, Rev. C. H. Townsend : pres. incumbent, 
J. Bowen, 1830: contains 1,710 acres: 15 /houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 477: ass*^* prop^^- £4,504: poor rates 
in 1838, £163. 88. 

LYNT, Wilts, a tithing in the parish of Coles- 
hill: 75 miles from London, 2 from Highworth, 

7 from Cricklade.-o«c^(Pop"- returned with the 
parish.) 

LYNTON, Devon, a parish in the hun<*- of Shir> 
well, union of Barnstaple, at the mouth of the 
"Lynn : the parish comprises the villages of Lynton 
and Lynmouth: 222 miles from London (coach 
road 185), 18 from Minehead, 18 from Barnstaple. 
-oM»-Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol to Tiverton, 
theqce 38 miles: from Derby, through Birmingham 
and Bristol, &c., 228 miles. <e«»> Money orders 
issued here: London letters deliv^- llj a.m. . 
post closes 1 p.m.-«*»-This place is much fre- 
quented during the summer season for sea-bathing, 
and many excellent houses have been erected for 
the accommodation of visitors. The view from the 
churchyard is singularly beautiful. There is an 
Independent chapel here. A pier has been erected 
for the accommodation of vessels engaged in the 
coasting trade, and fur the fishermen, whose takes 
are chiefly shipped for Bristol and other places. 
The lord of the manor holds an annual court-leet, 
when a portreeve, a tithing-man, and an ale-taster, 
are appointed. The views in the parish are ex- 



ceedingly picturesque, comprising the rocky coasts 
of the Bristol Channel, and the farroff shoses of 
Wales. About a mile west of "LynUm there is 
an extraordinary tract of scenery, called the Val- 
ley of Rocks. It is about half a mile in length, 
but not above a hundred yards in width, and is 
bounded by great fragments of rocks, piled one 
upon another; the elevations on each side 
being of mountainous height, and the masses 
of stone upon the summit forming rude natural 
oolumns fontastically arranged, so that they re- 
aemble the ruins of ancient hoildings; and 
vast fragments of rock overspread the valley 
in every direction. •«•»- The living, a perpetual 
curacy, with the parish of Countesbury, in the 
archd'- of Barnstaple, and diocese of Exeter, not 
in charge: pres. net income, £120: patron, Aroh- 
deac<m of Barnstaple : pres. incumbent. Matt 
Mundy, 1832: contains 7,160 acres: 153 houses: 
pop"- in 1841, 1,027: ass^- prop^* £1,987: poor 
rates in 1838, £281. 7a. Tithes commuted in 
1839. -<Mo- The following gentlemen have resi- 
dences at Lynton: — Edward AyahSard Sanford, 
Esq., of Nynehead Court, Somerset; CotonelJohn 
Dawson Rawdon, M.P.; Major^General Sir William 
L. Hennes; and the Rev. Henry Horace Hayes; — 
and in the parish of Countesbury, the Rev. Walter 
S. Halliday, at Gleuthome and Watersmeet; and 
the Bev. Thomas Roe, at Lynmouth. These are 
all beautifully situated; and Mr. Sanford, Sir 
William Herries, and Mr. Halliday, kindly allow 
their grounds to be shown to visitors. 

LYONSHALL (or Leohhalbs), Hbbefobd, a 
parish in the hun*^ of Stretford, union of Kington: 
153 miles from London (coach road 149), 3 fram 
Kington, 7 from Weobley.-o.oGt. West. BaiL 
through Oxford to Worcester, thenoe 35 miles: 
frx>m Derby, through Birmin^iam and Woreester, 
&c., 106 mUe8.'«>«9-Money oiSders issued at King- 
ton : London letters deliv^ 10 a.m.: post closes 2 
p.m.-o«o-This parish is bounded on the north by the 
river Avon. There are the remains here of an old 
moated castle, which, in the early part of the reign 
of Henry III., belonged to Sir Stephen de Ebroicis, 
then lord of the manor and castle, and on the site 
of which a curious antique ring was fennd.-«M>* 
The living, a di^ch^- vicarage in the archd^* and 
diocese of Hereford, is valued at £6. lOs. 7}d.: 
pres. net income, £350: patron. Bishop of Here- 
ford: pres. incumbent, John Randall, 1826: con- 
tains 4,650 acres': 165 houses: pop*- in 1841, 
912: ass**- prop}"- £6,355: poor rates in 1838, 
£296. 16s. 

LYSS-TURNEY, Hants, a chapelry in the 
parish of Odiham — (which see for access, &o.): 
50 miles from London, 4 from Peterafield, 12 from 
Famham.'-Mo-Money orders issued at Petersfield: 
London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post closes 7jt ?•»»• 
« a «c . The charities amount to about £7 a year.-a*e»- 
The living (St. Peter) is a perpetual curacy in the 
archd^^' and diocese of Winchester: pres. net in- 
come, £96: patron. Chancellor of Sarum: pres. 
incumbent, Wm. Bridges, 1847: contains 3,380 
acres: 107 houses: pop*^ in 1841, 656: 
prop}"- £2,586: poor rates in 1837, £292. 
Fair: May 6, for homed cattle and horses. 

LYTCHETT. See LiCBkT-MATBJiVBBS. 

LYTCHETT. See Lxchst-Mimbibb. 




LYTHAM, Lahcasteb, a parish and village in 
the hnn^ of Amoandemess, union of Fylde, on the 
northern bank of the estuaiy of the Ribble : 237 
miles from London (coach road 230), 13 from 
Preston, 5 from Kirkham.«>«>-Nor. West. Bail, 
thnragh Crewe and Preston to Lytham station: 
from Derby, through Crewe, &c., 137 miles.-o«G>- 
Money orders isBaed at Preston: London letters 
ddh^ lOjt a.m.: poet doses 6^ p.nL-c>«e-lliis 
pnish, which is situated on the northern shore of 
die estuary of the Ribble, is much frequented for 
sea-bathing, and of late years many improvements 
hsTB been made in the plaoe, to meet the more 
rsihied requirements of the visitors. Handsome 
hiotds have been opened ; a hiDiard-room has been 
erected ; and part of the heaoh has been levelled 
to form a jMomenade, which is exceedingly j^eas- 
ingt and commanda many delightful views of the 
eoimtiy on the eonthem side of the estuary. 
Within the last few years the church has been 
reboot in the later style of English architecture, 
tad is now a very beantiftil object. About a mile 
eastward of tiie town is Lytham Pool, a large nsr 
tnnl basin, where vessels bringing com, or other 
eommoditiea, to the port of Preston, discharge their 
cargoes into smaller craft; at its northern extre- 
mity there is a graving dock for the building and 
repairing of Teasels. Some few of the inhabi- 
tants of Lytham are engaged in fishing. A fVee 
•ehool here is endowed, fnlm various benefoctions, 
with an income of about £104 a year.-«Mc»-The 
living (St Cnthbert), a perpetual curacy in the 
diocese of Manchester, is Valued at £22 : pros, net 
income, £131 1 patron, T. Clifton, Esq. : pres. in- 
cumbent, R. ~B, Robinson, 1834: contains 5,240 
acres: 268 houses: pop^ in 1841, 2,082: probable 
pop^ in 1849, 2,394: ass'- pra^- £6,944: poor 
rates in 1838, £352. 5s. Tithes commuted in 
1839. -<Mo. Fairs: July 8, for wool.-eM>-Lytham 
EhO, the seftt of Thomas Clifton, Esq., a large 
benefactor to the new church, comprises, in its 
kitdien and out-offices, a portion of the bnildings 
of a Benedietlne priory, founded as a cell to the 
memistery oC Durham, by Richard Fitz-Roger, in 
the hitter part of the reign of Richard I.: it 
was dissolved with the smaller monasteries, by 
Henry Vlll. 

LYTHAN'A (St.), Gt.AiiOBOAX, a parish in the 
him^ of Dinaa-Powifl, union of Cardiff: 175 miles 



from London (coach road 166), 6 from Cardiff, 6 
from Llandaff.^oM»>Gt. West. Rail, through Stone- 
house, Gloucester, and Chepstow, to Cardiff, thence 
6 miles : from Derby, through Birmingham, Glou- 
cester, &C., 166 miles.-oM>- Money orders issued at 
Cardiff: London letters deliv^ 10} a.m. : post 
closes 1} p.m.-e«s>-The living, a discM* vicarage 
in the archd^' and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at 
£6. Is. 3d. : pres. net income, £199 : patron, Arch- 
deacon of Llandaff: pres. incumbent, Wm. Bruce: 
contains 17 houses: pop**- in 1841, 110: asa^ 
props'- £1,180: poor rates in 1838, £76. 2s.-«»». 
The pleasure grounds of John Bruce Pryce, Esq., 
of Duffryn Place, are in this parish, as also the 
village of Du£&yn. One of the largest cromleohs 
(Druidical temples) is on the Maei^elin fhrm, also 
in this parish. 

LYTHE, NoRTB RiDiKG, ToBK, a parish and 
township in the east dividon of the liberty of 
Langbaurgh, union of Whitby: the parish includes 
the townships of Bamby, Borrowby, Eilerbyv 
Hutton-Mulgrave, Mickleby, Mulgrave, Newton, 
and Cgthorpe : 281 miles fi!x>m London (coach 
road 240), 4 tnm Whitby, 47 from York.^o«a. 
Nor. West. Rail, through Rngby, Derby, and 
York, to Whitby, thence 4 miles: firom Derby, 
through York, &o., 149 miles. -^to- Money orders 
issued at Whitby : London lettera doliv^* at noon : 
post doses at 1} p.m. -ewe- The church, although 
of modem appearance, is an ancient structure. 
Peter de Manley, in the reigpo of Henry III., ob- 
tained a weekly market to be held here, and a 
fair on the festival of St. Oswald, but both have 
long been disused. The Wesleyan Methodists have 
a chapel here. -«m»- Jhe living (St. Oswald), a 
disch*^ vicarage in the archd^^* of Cleaveland, and 
diocese of York, is valued at £10. 12s. 6d. : pres. 
net income, £150: patrcm, Archbishop of York: 
pres. incumbent, William Long, 1826: contains 
13,250 acres: 446 houses: pop*"- m 1841, 2,080: 
probable pop"- in 1849, 2^392: ass*- propJ^- 
£14,693 : poor rates in 1838, £682. 88. Tithes 
commuted in 1776. 

LYTHE, North Rinnia, Yobk, a township in the 
above parish. -o«o. (For access and postal arrange- 
ments, see above.) --oMa- Contains 3,620 acres: 245 
houses: pop** in 1841, 1,283: ass"^ prop^- £5,010: 
poor rates in 1838, £337. 16s. 

LYVYNGSBOURNE. See BaAKESBOUfiBB. 



MAB 



144 



MAB 



M. 



MABE (or Layabe), Coriiwall, a parish in the 
east division of the hun*^- of Kerrier, union of Fal- 
mouth: 292 miles from London (coach road 268), 
5 from Falmouth, 3 from Penryn. o ^ o Qt, West. 
Rail, through Bristol and Exeter to Flymouthf 
thence 48 miles : from Derhy, through Birming- 
ham, Bristol, &c., 306 miles. -qm^ Money orders 
issued at Falmouth: London letters deliy^ 4} 
p.m.: post closes 9 p.m.-e^o-The church has a 
lofty handsome tower, crowned with pinnacles. 
There is a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in the vil- 
lage. The parish abounds with excellent granite, 
part of which was used in building Waterloo 
Bridge over the riyer Thames. Large quantities 
of this stone are shipped at Penryn for different 
parts of the country .^om>* The liying (8t. Mabe) is 
a vicarage, annexed to that of Myler: contains 
2,410 acres: 78 houses: pop"- in 1841, 594: ass*- 
prop7 £2,383: poor rates in 1838, £321. 17s. 

MABLETHORPE (St. Maby), Lincolh, a par- 
ish in the Marsh division of the hun**- of Calce- 
worth, parts of Lindsey, union of Louth : 138 miles 
from London (coach road 147), 7 from Alford, 13 
from Louth. -e*e^ 6t. Nor. Rail, through Peter- 
borough and Boston to Alford, thence 7 miles: 
from Derby, through Nottingham, Grantham, Bos- 
ton, &c., 99 miles.-o*o-Monqy orders issued at Al- 
ford: London letters deUv*^ 11 a.m. : post closes 
3 p.m.-o«c-The living, a rectory, with that of 
Stane, in the archd''- and diocese of Lincoln, is 
valued at £17. Os. 2^.: pros, net income, £700: 
patron. Rev. Lovick Cooper : pres. incumbent, Lo- 
vick Cooper, 1831 : contains 2,800 acres : 59 
houses: pop"* in 1841, 261: ass**- prop^- £4,162: 
poor rates in 1838, £280. 6s. 

MABLETHORPE (&r. Petbb), Lincolh, a par- 
ish in the Marsh division of the hun^ of Csdoe- 
worth, parts of Lindsey, union of Louth, on the 
coast of the North Sea: 148 miles from London, 8 
from Alford, 6 from Saltfleet.-o*e» (For access and 
postal arrangements, see above. )'e*»-The living is 
a disch^- rectory, annexed to that of Theddlethorpe 
St. Helen : pop"* in 1841, 62.— (Other returns 
with Mablethobpe St. Mabt.) 

MABYN (St.), Cobnwall, a parish in the hun*** 
of Trigg, union of Bodmin: 271 miles from Lon- 
don (coach road 237), 5 from Bodmin, 9 from 
Camelford. -«•»- Gt. West. Rail, through Bristol 
and Exeter to Plymouth, thence 27 miles : from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Bristol, &c., 285 
miles. >««»- Money orders issued at Bodmin: Lon- 
don letters deliv'* IJ p.m.: post closes 11 a.m* 
The church is a handsome structure, with a lofty 
square embattled tower, crowned with pinnacles. 
It was repaired, and entirely repewed, at the sole 
expense of the late rector, the Rev. G. L. Gk>wer. 
There is a Wesleyan chapel in the village. An 
almshouse, for seven poor families, was erected 
here at an expense of £200, the accumulated be- 
quest of £100 from William Parker, Esq. The 



Rev. C. Peters, author of a volume of Sermons, and 
of a Dissertation on the Book of Job, was for some 
time rector of this parish.^oMxThe living, a rectory 
in the archd^^- of Cornwall, and diocese of Exeter, 
is valued at £36 : pres. net income, £712 : patron, 
Earl of Falmouth : pres. incumbent, G. H. Somer- 
set, 1842: contains 3,570 acres: 149 houses: 
po^- in 1841, 870: ass^- prop^- £6,061: poor 
rates in 1838, £411. 12s.^»«:^Fair, Feb. 14. 

MACCLESFIELD (or Maxfibld), Chbsteb, a 
parochial chapelry, borough, and market town, in 
the bun*** and union of Macclesfield, on the river 
BoUin, near its source: 178 miles from Lo9don 
(coach road 167), 12 from Stockport. -o«e* Nor. 
West. Bail, through Rugby, Leicester, Burton, and 
Leek, to Macclesfield station : from Derby, through 
Burton, Leek, &c., 56 miles. -aM>> Money orders 
issued at Macclesfield: London letters deliv'* 8 
a.m. : post closes 7} p.m. o<o Previously to the 
Norman Conquest, this place constituted a portion 
of the demesne of the Earls of Mercia, who held a 
court here for the ancient hundred of Hameston ; 
and hence, in the Doo josday Book, it is represented 
as having been one of the seats of Earl Edwin. 
When that survey of William was made, it was 
comprised within the earldom of Chester, of which 
it continued to form a part until that jurisdiction 
was abolished, wheo the hundred, manor, and 
forest of Macclesfield lapsed to the Crown, and the 
sovereign is now consequently lord of the hundred; 
about one-third of which, including the township 
of Macclesfield, and sixteen other townships, con- 
stitute the manor and forest of Macclesfield. The 
forest was anciently entitled to the same rights, 
and protected by the same laws, as the other royal 
forests ; but some of the laws have expired with 
the disafibrestment of the tract to which they ap- 
plied, but a few of the old officers are still retained, 
although, since the abolition of the feudal system, 
their services have not been required. When this 
territory lapsed to the Crown, parcels of the forest 
were granted away, and the whole of it has for 
some years past been brought under cultivation. 
During the great civil war, Macclesfield was held for 
the king, but was taken, after an obstinate defence, 
by the parliamentarians under Sir William Brere- 
ton, who was the commander of the county, by 
whom it was retained, notwithstanding a very gal- 
lant attempt made by Sir Thomas Acton to dnve 
him out. On a hill eastward of the town, there 
are the vestiges of the parliamentarian encamp- 
ment. On Charles II. 's attempt to regain the 
British crown, the men of Macclesfield entered 
into his cause with enthusiasm, and it was deter- 
mined to raise four regiments, of 700 men each, 
for his service. Macclesfield is situated on the 
acclivity of a steep hill, near the borders of the dis- 
trict still called Macclesfield Forest. The little 
river Bollin, running through " the Water*' in the 
lowest part of the town, is crossed by several 




bridges, wbich unite the habitations on both banks. 
The town consists chiefly- of four principal streets, 
which contain many houses of a very superior 
order. The streets are well paved and lighted 
with gas, and the town is well supplied with water, 
eonyeyed through pipes from a neighbouring com- 
mon. The road from London by Leek to Stock- 
port, passes through one of the principal streets. 
There is an open market-place in the northern part 
of the town, where the church stands. There is 
hardly a section of the dissenting community which 
has not one or more chapels here. A free grammar- 
school was founded here in the time of Edward YI., 
by Sir John Fercyval, who became lord mayor of 
London ; its endowment exceeds £800 per annum, 
but what is done with the amount does not very 
clearly appear. An almsfaonse was endowed in 
1703, by Mra. Stanley, with £6 per annum, and 
there are scTeial other minor charities for clothing 
and apprenticing children. Macclesfield was for- 
merly the centre of an extensive trade in buttons, 
wRmght of silk, mohair, and twist, at one time 
curiously worked with a needle, and used to trim 
full-dress suits for parties or the court; and, in 
order to protect the trade, an act of parliament 
was passed, inflicting a penalty on the wearing of 
buttons formed of moulds, covered with the stuff 
of which the garment was made. An attempt was 
made, in 1778, to enforce this act, but the skill of 
the operative soon produced buttons of horn and 
metal, which evaded both the spirit and the letter 
of the act, so that the very means used to preserve 
the then business of the town, proved to be its 
^>eedj and certain destruction. The weaving of 
silk was introduced into Macclesfield about the year 
1787. The trade was for a long time confined to the 
manufacture of grey bandanas, a few romales, and 
coloured handkerchiefs, but it now comprises every 
variety of piece goods^ its products in this brandi 
being adapted to all circumstances. In addition 
to the weaving works, there are also bleaching, 
printing, colouring, and other establishments, ne- 
cessary to complete the manufacture; and fh)m 
the town having every means of communication, 
both fi>r inland and foreign trade, there is lit- 
tle doubt but the prosperity of the place will in 
future years largely increase. The first extant 
charter of Macclesfield was granted in the 45th 
year of Henry III. to Prince Edward, Earl of 
Chester, and afterwards Edward I., but various 
other charters were also granted up to the time of 
Ciharles II. Under the recent municipal act, the 
borough is included in schedule A, amongst those 
to have a commission of the peace, which has ac- 
cordingly been granted. Under the municipal act, 
Macclesfield is divided into six wards, the govern- 
ment being vested in twelve aldermen, and thirty- 
ox councillors, under the usual corporate style; 
their public income amounts to about £6,000 per 
aannm. Macclesfield was enfranchised by the 
Reform Act, and now sends two members to parlia- 
ment. It is also one of the polling-places for the 
northern division of the county. The Macclesfield 
poor-law union comprises 41 parishes, with a popu- 
lation of about 55,000, spread over an area of 102 
square miles.-ew^-The living (St. Michael) is a per- 
petual curacy in the archd^^* and diocese of Chester : 
pros, net income, £214 - patron, Simeon's Trustees : 
voL.tn. 



pres. incumbent, C. A. J. Smith, 1847 : contains 
2,410 acres : 4,543 houses : pop"- in 1841, 24,137 : 
ass^ propy- £30,305: poor rates in 1837, £5,423. 
19s. ^o«e^ Market days, Tuesday and Saturday. 
Fairs: May 6, June 22, July 11, Oct. 4, and Nov. 
11, for cattle and wool. -o«o- Bankers : W. J. & T. 
Brockleburst & Co. — draw on Jones, Lloyd, & Co. ; 
Branch of Manchester and Liverpool District Bank- 
ing Co. — draw on Smith, Payne, & Co. -©•o- Inns: 
Angel, Bull's Head, and Macclesfield Arms. 

MACCLESFIELD FOREST, Chester, a cha- 
pelry in the parish of Prestbury : 169 miles from 
London, 4 from Macclesfield, 7 from Buxton.^o«c» 
(For access and postal arrangements, see above.) 
-©•o-The living is a pe^etual curacy in the archd^^- 
and diocese of Chester : pres. net income, £60 : 
patron, Earl of Derby : pres. incumbent, G-. Moun- 
sey, 1798 : contains 4,000 acres : 45 houses : popl- 
in 1841,256: ass*- prop^- £1,768 : poor rates in 
1838, £116. 2s. 

MACEFEN, Chester, a township in the parish 
of Malpas — (which see for access, &c.) : 2 miles 
from Malpas.-o*o»Money orders issued at Malpas : 
London letters deliv^ 8 a.m. : post closes 4} p.m. 
-<o«o- Contains 380 acres: 10 houses: pop°* in 
1841, 68: ass*- prop^- £515: poor rates in 1838, 
£35. Is. 

MACHEN (Lower ahd Upper), Mowsiocth, a 
parish in the bun** of Wentloog, union of Newport, 
on the river Rumney: 162 miles from London 
(coach road 154), 6 from Newport, 9 from Cardiff. 
-o«>-6t West. Rail, through Stonehouse, Glou- 
cester, and Chepstow, to Newport thence 6 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 
153 miles.-o«c»-Money orders issued at Newport : 
London letters deliv^ 9) a.m. : post closes 3 p.m. 
-o*=»-The living (St. Michael), a rectory in the 
archd^^- and diocese of Llandaff, is valued at £16. 
16s. 5^ : pres. net income, £351 : patron, Sir C. 
Morgan, Bart. : pres. incumbent, A. Morgan, 1829: 
contains 3,940 acres: 262 houses: pop'- in 1841, 
1,577 : probable pop**- in 1849, 1,813: ass**- prop^- 
£2,702 : poor rates in 1838, £423. 15b. Tithes 
commuted 4ii 1839. 

MACHYNLLETH, MoifrooMERv, a parish, bo- 
rough, and market town, in the bun**- and union of 
Machynlleth, North Wales, on the river Dyfi, or 
Dovey : the parish is very extensive, and includes, 
besides the town and liberties of Machynlleth, the 
townships of Isygarrey and Uchygarrey : 212 
miles from London (coach road 206), 25 from New- 
town.-o«o-Nor. West. Rail, through Wolverhamp- 
ton and Shrewsbury to Newtown, thence 25 miles : 
fh)m Derby, through Stafford, &c., 127 miIes.-o«ci. 
Money orders issued here : Lendon letters deliv^* 
2.40 p.m. : post closes 10 a.m.-o«c^It was at this 
place that Owen Glendower exercised his first acts 
of sovereignty, and where, in 1402, having as- 
sembled his parliament, he formally assumed the 
crown of Wales. The ancient building in which 
that parliament assembled is still standing. The 
unfortunate David Gktm — the Captain Flvelin of 
Shakspeare — was imprisoned hereby Owen, whose 
life he intended to take by assassination, but who 
generously liberated him, on his engaging never 
again to make a similar attempt, or take up ai-ms 
against him. To Gam is ascribed the celebrated 
reply to Henry V., who had sent him to recon- 



MAC 



146 



MAD 



noitre the French forces preyioos to the battle of 
Aginconrt — ** Please jour Highnese, theie are 
enough to be killed, enough to be taken prisonera, 
and enough to run away." He himself, poor 
fellow, was killed during the fight, and lived 
not to see the victory which his valour had helped 
to gain. The town of Machynlleth consists 
chiefly of two spacious stxeets, which contain 
many neat and respectable houses; the town- 
hall and market-house, a neat edifice, occupy- 
ing a central position. The principal trade of 
the place consists in the manufapture of coarse 
webs, woollen cloths, and flannels, which, after the 
old fashion, are gcnecally made at the workmen's 
houses, and forwarded to Newtown from the seigh* 
bourhood, as to a common depot. Tanning is also 
carried on to some extent, and in the vieinity there 
are slate quarries and some lead mines. . This 
place formerly possessed an excell^t shipping 
trade, the river Dovey being navigable as &r as 
within two miles of the town ; but since the canal 
was opened to Newtown, and facilities were amply 
provided between this part of Wales and the com- 
mercial districts, this business has altogether de- 
clined, and the -carrying trade is chiefly dona by 
barges. Oak-bark and timber form the imports, 
while com, coal, and other exports are sent out. 
Courts leet and baron are convened twice a year, 
and petty sessions are held on the first Wednesday- 
in every month. Machynlleth, after having,boen 
disfranchised for upwanls of a century, was. re- 
stored to its privileges by the Keform Act, aad is 
now a contributory borough with Montgomery. It 
is also one of the polling-places for the county* 
The Independents, Baptists, and Wesleyaa and 
Calvinistic Methodists, all have chapels here. One 
of the schools hero is endowed with the interest of 
£900 per annum . Mr. Humphrey Morris left seven ' 
town-houses, which are inhabited by the poor, rent 
free ; the other charities produce about £12. 10s. . 
per annum. The Machynlleth poor-law union 
comprises 11 parishes, with a population of about 
12,000 pcrson8.-o»o-The living (St Peter), a rec- 
tory in the diocese of St. Asaph, is valued at £11. 
lOs. 7^d. : pres. net income, £230 : patron, Bishojp- 
of St. Asaph : pros, incumbent, G. Yenables, 1805: 
contains 499 houses: pop^* in 1841, 2,482 : prol>- 
able pop**- in 1849, 2,854: ass*^ 
poor rates in 1838, £1,057. 8s 
Wednesday. Fairs: first Wednesday in March, 
May 16, June 26, July 9, August 7, Sept. 18, 
Oct. 21, and Nov. 26.«>«c^Bankers: Sub-Branchof 
the National Provincial Bank of England— ^draw; 
on London Joint Sitock Bank.^oM»*Hotels: Herbert 
Arms, and Wynnstay Arms. 

MACKWORTH, Debby, a parish in the hun<** 
of Morleston and Litchurch, union of Belper : 135 
miles from London (coach road 129) , 3 from Derby, 
7 from Belper.-<»«ci-Nor. West. Rail, through Rugby 
to Derby, thence 3 miles : irom Derby, by road, 3 
miles. -o«e*-Money orders issued at Derby : London 
letters deliv^* 9 a.m.: post closes 8j p.m.-«9*oThe 
charities produce about £18 a year.-<Me>.The living 
(All Saints), a disch**- vicarage, with the perpetual 
curacy of AUestree, in the archd^* of Derby, and 
diocese of Lichfield, is valued at £9. 3s. : pres. net 
income, £161 . patron, F. Mundy, Esq.: pres. in- 
cumbent, G. Pickering, 1802: contains 3,400 



'^' propy- £6,243: 
>Ma):ket day,. 



acres: 108 houses; pop"* in 1841, 561: ass*- 
prop^- £6,596 : poor rates in 1838, £159- 14s. 

MACUNIS. See Baoh-Ymys. 

MADDINGTON, Wilto, a parish and village 
in the hun^ of Branch and Dole, union of Ames- 
bury : 107 miles fipom London (opaoh road 83), 12 
from Devices, 1 1 from Sali^ury»-«M-Sou. West. 
RaiL through Bishftpstpke to Salisbury, thence 11 
miles : from Derby, through Rugby, Oxford, Bead- 
ing, Bishopstoke, &o., J200 qiile8«-i4«»-Money orders 
iswied at Devises : London letters deUv^* 10 a.m. : 
post doses 5^ p.m. >c»p A violent inundation oc- 
curred heire, January 16, 1841,' .which destsoyed 
seven tenements* ^«»«^ The livipg (the Virgin 
Mary), a peq;»etual curacy in the a«ohd7- an4 dio- 
cese of SaruflD, is valu^ at £60 : pres. net income, 
£54; patron, Jamed Matpn, Esq. t pres. incnm- 
beut, Edward Wilton, 1835; contains 4,180 acres.: 
75 houses : pop"* m 1841, 445 : ass"* prop''- £2,942 : 
poor rates in 1838, £249. ,15a.roM^The Manor 
Hqusc was former^ * residence of the .f^Ia of 
Xlehester.-^Maddington Housed now the property 
of J. S> W. Erie Drax, Esq., through the heiresses 
of Erule and Tooker. 

MADEHUBST, Sussszi a parish in tha hun^ of 
Avisford, rape of Arundel, union -of West Hamp- 
nett: 74 miles from London (ooaoh road, 53), 4 
from Arundel, 9 ftom Chichester* -««>- Brighton 
and Sou. Coa^t Rail, to Arundel, thence 4. miles: 
from Derby, through London, &c., 206.nules.-e«o«'' 
Money orders issued at Arundel : London letter^ 
deliv^* 8 a^m. : post closes ^ p.m.'<9«»-The living (St. 
Mary Magdalene), a diseh^- vicarage in the arohd^' 
and diocese of Chichester, i/i yalued at £6. Ss.^ lOd. :. 
pres. net income, £$0 : patron, JQJshop of Chic^e^ 
ter: pres. incumbent,. W. Lai^leyi 184$: contains 
1,900 acQBs: 27 houses: pop""* in 1841, 150: ass'* 
propy- £1,027, r.. 

MADELEY, Stafford, a parish in thenq^ 
division of the.hun*^- of Pixehillf union of New- 
castle-under^Lyne : the parish iaoludes the town- 
ship of Onnel^y : 150 miles firom. London (coach 
road 155), 6£rom Newcastle-under-Lyne, 11 £roia 
Drayton. -^ae- Nor, West. Rail, throug)! -Rugby, 
Tamworth, and Stafford, to Madeley station: fiom 
Derby, throngh Burton, .^taffocd, &c., 60 miles. 
-«M»»Money orders issued at Newcastle; London 
letters deliv^ 8i a.m,; po^t doses 7 p.m.-«w»>Thers 
is a Wesleyan chapel her^. ^ii John .Qffley en- 
dowed two schools here wit)i a rentrcharge of.£60 
per annum; and also ondowed almshouses for ten 
poor persons, each of whopi receives Is. 9d. yrwidj^ 
-<>M>-The living (All Saints), a disch*^ vicarage in 
the archd'- of Stafford, and diocese of Lichfield, is. 
valned at £4. 16s. : pres. ^et income, £266 : pa* 
tron, Lord Crewe : pros, incumbent, J, W. Daltry,- 
1833 : contains 6,010 acres; 229 houses : popl- 
in 1841, 1,492: prohabW pop»- in 1849, 1,716: 
ass^ prop''- £7,273 : poor rates in 1837, £446. 
Tithes commuted ix^ 1839.-«K>»Hay House. 

MADELEY, Salop, a parish and masket town 
in the hun^- of Wenlock, union. of Madeley, on th9 
banks of jfche Severn, and intersected by the Shrews- 
bury Canal : 146 mil^ from London (coach road 
139) , 4 from Shiffnall, 6 firom Wellington.-c»o-Nor. 
West. Rail^ through Birmingham and WcHvet- 
hampton to ShifinaU, thence 4 miles ; from J>erby| 
through Birmingham, &c-, 75 miles. -3m»- Money 



orders' Issued at ghiffnall: L<)nd<m letters deliv*'- 8 
a.TO. : poet closes 6 p.m.^a»o-Thecharch is a hand- 
acme modem straotnre. The parish of Madeley 
extends as far aa Coalbrook, so noted for the lofty 
fiills and extensiye hanging woods by which it is 
environed, as well as for the immense iron-works 
which are there carried on« The iron bridge erected 
here over the Seyem in 1779, which is 100 feet 
span and 100 feet in height, was the first of the 
Idnd cast in England; it forms a beaatiiiil feature 
in. the landscape. At Coalport there is a large 
mann&ctory of porceUun or china, and in the par- 
iMi theno are several coal mines, besides springs 
of petroleum, which were at one time very produc- 
tive. Near to the entrance to the bridge stands 
the market-house. The Wesleyan Methodists, 
Society of Friends, and Roman Catholics, have 
places of worship here The Madeley poor-law 
tmion comprises 12 parishes, with a population .of 
abont 22,000, spread over 43 square miles. The 
Rer. John William Fletcher, a Swiss, so celebrated 
for his earnest and unaffected piety, tras for some 
time vicar of this parish, died, and was interred 
here in 1785. ^3*e^ The Kvihg (6t. Michael), a 
disch^ Ticarage in the archd^^- of Salop, and diocese 
of Hereford, is valued at £4. ITs.-lOd. : pres. net 
income, £241: patron, Rev. J. H. A. Gwyther: 
pres. incumbent, J. H. A. Gwyther : contiuns' 2,750 
acres : 1 ,205 houses : pop"* in 1841, 7,368 : prob- 
able pop*- in 1849, 8,473: ass*- prop^- £10,927: 
poor rates in 1838, £1,619. 9s.-o*oMarket day, 
Friday. Fairs : last Tuesday in January,' May 
29, and second Tuesday in October. 

MADELEY-HOLME, STAFFORn, a liberty in 
the parish of Checkley and Tean — (which see for 
access, &c.) — on the river Tean : 141 miles from 
London, 5 from Uttoxeter, 11 from 8tafrord.^Q«e^ 
BConey orders issued at Uttoxeter : London letters 
deliv*' 10} a.m. : post closes 5 p.m.-o»e^There are 
excellent quarries of freestone in the liberty, from 
which blocks of any size can be obtained.-c«e.Oon- 
tain8ie4 houses: pop^-in 1841, 624.— (Other re- 
turns with' the parish.) 

MADIlfGLEY, Caubbidoe, a parish in the hun**- 
of North Stow, union of Chesterton i 60 miles from 
London (coach road 50], 3 from Cambridge, 12 
from Roy8ton.-«3«©-Nor. and East. Co^ Rail, to Cam- 
bridge, thence 3 miles : from Derby, through Sys- 
ton and Peterborough to Ounbridge, &c., 129 miles. 
>0«s> Money orders issued at Cambridge: London 
letters deliv^ 8 J a.m : post closes 9 p.m.-o«e-The 
Hving (the Virgin Mary), a disch** vicarage in the 
ar^hd'^ and diocese of Ely, is valued at £6. 9s. 7d. : 
pres. net income, £78: patrori, Bishop of Ely: 
pres. incumbent, James Atlay, 1847: containr' 
1,500 acres: 51 houses : pop"- in 1841, 282 : ass'*- 
prop^- £1,173: poor rates in 1838, £179. 4s.-3«c>- 
Madingley Hdl is the seat of Sir St Vincent Cot- 
ton, Biot., whose ancestor inherited it by marriage 
with the daughter and heiress of Mr. Sergeant 
EBiide, in the reign of Henry VIII. ; and, sinco 
that event, this fitmily has generally been distin- 
guished from the other families named Cotton, by 
the prefix of Hinde. The manor-house is an an- 
cient brick building of the time of Queen' Mary or 
Elizabeth, like Holland House at Kensington. It 
is nearly surrounded by woods and pleasure- 
grounds, and from the road has a very picturesque 



appearance. The house is most handsomely fur- 
nished, and is embellished by a number of fine 
woiks of art, among which are several histori- 
cal paintings, and a few portraits, the best of 
which are those of Sir John Hinde Cotton, Bart., 
by Sir (Godfrey Kneller, and of William Stukeley, 
Esq., by Walter. The park and pleasure-grounds 
were very much Improved by the late Sir John 
Hinde Cotton, and the village church, which stands 
near the mansion, was repaired and ornamented at 
his expense. Some monuments of the Hinde and 
Cotton families are contained in the building. Sir 
St. Vincent Cotton derives- his descent from Sir 
Henry Cotton, Knt, lord of the manor of Cotton 
Hall, in the county of Cambridge, in the thirteenth 
century, whose descendant, Sir Thomas Cotton, 
Knt., married Alice, daughter and heir of John de 
Hastings of Landwade, in the county of Cambridge, 
and thus acquired the estate from which the title 
is derived. The great-grandson of that gentleman, 
Sir Thomas Cotton, was high sheriff of Cambridge- 
shire in the sixteenth year of Edward IV. Sir John 
Cotton, Knt., was high sheriff of the county at the 
breaking out of the civil war between Charles I. 
and his parliament, and proclaimed the Earl oi 
Essex a traitor in every maricet town in the county. 
He immediately took up arms for his sovereign, 
and was employed to carry the university plate of 
Cambridge to the king, then lying at Oxford; a 
trust which he safely frilfiUed. He was created a 
baronet in 1641, and from him, in a direct line of 
distinguished ancestry, the present baronet, who 
was formerly an officer of the 10th Hussars, is 
descended. 

MADLEY, Hereford, a parish in the hnn^ of 
Webtree, union of Dore': 147 miles ftt)m London 
(coach toad 144), 7 from Hereford, 10 from 
Weobley.-owMJt. West. Rail, through Stonehouse 
and Gloucester to Ross, thence 15 miles: from 
Derby, through Birmingham, Gloucester, &c., 138 
mile8.-si*e.-Money orders issued at Hereford : Lon- 
don letters deliV** 9 a.m. : post closes 3 p.m.-o»o- 
The charities produce about £27 a year.-o«o-The 
living, a vicarage, with the curacy of Tibcrton,- in 
the cUoccse of Hereford, is valued at £16. Is. 8d.: 
pres. net income, £608 : patron, Dean and Chap- 
ter of Hereford : pres. incumbent, J. Merewether, 
1844: contains 5,440 acres: 190 houses: pop»- in 
1841, 923: ass*- propy- £5,930: poor rates in 
1838, £389, 7s. 

MADRESFIELD, Worcester, a parish in the 
lower division of the hun** of Pershore, union of 
Upton-upon-Severn, north-east of the Malvern 
hilla: 125 miles from London (coach road 117), 
7 from Worcester, 2 from Malvern, -awe . Gt. West. 
Rail, through Oxford- to Worcester, thence 7 miles : 
from Derby, through Birmingham, Worcester, &c., 
78 mile8.-o«>-Money orders issued at Worcester : 
London letters deliv^ 9 a.m.: post closes 5^ p.m. 
-o»o*-There is a school here endowed with £3 per 
annum.-o«<»-The living, a rectory in the archd''- 
and diocese of Worcester, is valued at £3. ISs. 
lljd. : pres. net income, £230: patron. Earl 
Beauchamp : pres. incumbent, Charles Hill, 1832 : 
contains 920 acres: 41 houses: pop"- in 1841, 
180: ass*- prop^- £1,495: poor rates in 1838, 
£58.^a«c:^Madre8iiGld Court is the seat of the Right 
Hon. Earl Beauchamp. The mansion is a mag- 



MAD 



148 



MAE 



nificent alteration of the old baronial castle, and 
partakes partly of its ancient character of a feudal 
domain, and partly of a style of modem elegance. 
Yet, though the alterations have been extensive, 
its various features carry back the mind to olden 
times ; and its moat, sleeping like a g^rdian mon- 
ster around the walls, from the waters of which 
their foundations spring — its antique bridge and 
gateway, with its flat Gothic arch, and grated doors, 
and spandriUed roof, and deep still silence, conjure 
up the bygone ages, when these footways were 
trod by belted knights and boddiccd ladies fair, 
and all the panoply of a Norman lord threw an 
air of chivalry over everything he ruled. The in- 
terior of this fine mansion is appropriately assorted, 
and very magnificently furnished